• David Tennant and wife Georgia Moffett welcome fifth child
    News
    Evening Standard

    David Tennant and wife Georgia Moffett welcome fifth child

    David Tennant and Georgia Moffett have announced the arrival of their fifth child.The actress, 34, posted a photograph of Tennant, 48, holding the new born in a car seat while leaving the hospital.

  • The five clearest reasons why Boris Johnson’s so-called Brexit deal must be rejected this week
    News
    The Independent

    The five clearest reasons why Boris Johnson’s so-called Brexit deal must be rejected this week

    By this time next week, we should know whether the UK will leave the European Union on 31 October or whether an extension to the Article 50 process has been granted so we do not crash out without a deal in the short term.This will all depend on whether the prime minister can win agreement for his proposals, first from the EU at the European Council meeting on Thursday and Friday, and then from the UK parliament on Saturday.

  • Vinnie Jones calls Coleen Rooney and Rebekah Vardy 'an embarrassment' in tearful TV interview
    News
    Yahoo Celebrity UK

    Vinnie Jones calls Coleen Rooney and Rebekah Vardy 'an embarrassment' in tearful TV interview

    The ex-footballer couldn't imagine his late wife having been involved in a public row.

  • Joe Sugg says girlfriend Dianne Buswell is 'not ok' after shock 'Strictly' exit
    News
    Yahoo Celebrity UK

    Joe Sugg says girlfriend Dianne Buswell is 'not ok' after shock 'Strictly' exit

    The pro dancer looked heartbroken as she sobbed her way through her final dance with Dev Griffin.

  • Sir Elton John brands Michael Jackson 'a disturbing person to be around' in tell-all memoir
    News
    Yahoo Celebrity UK

    Sir Elton John brands Michael Jackson 'a disturbing person to be around' in tell-all memoir

    The Rocketman star's autobiography continues to lift the lid on his inside experiences of the world's most famous people.

  • No Fleetwood Mac or Led Zep at Glastonbury for 50th anniversary, says organiser
    News
    PA Media: UK News

    No Fleetwood Mac or Led Zep at Glastonbury for 50th anniversary, says organiser

    Emily Eavis said neither of the veteran bands would be performing at the festival in 2020.

  • Millions unaware you'll need this to drive abroad if there's no deal
    News
    motor1

    Millions unaware you'll need this to drive abroad if there's no deal

    If we leave the EU without a deal, you'll be needing one of these to drive on the continent.

  • Black woman killed by white officer in her own home while babysitting nephew
    News
    Sky News

    Black woman killed by white officer in her own home while babysitting nephew

    The family of a black woman killed in her own home by a white police officer have accused the officer of murder. Atatiana Jefferson, 28, was killed in her home in Fort Worth, Texas, while looking after her eight-year-old nephew. Fort Worth Police said officers saw someone near a window and one of them drew his duty weapon after "perceiving a threat".

  • Scores of highly venomous Portuguese man-of-war 'jellyfish' wash up on beaches in Cornwall
    News
    The Independent

    Scores of highly venomous Portuguese man-of-war 'jellyfish' wash up on beaches in Cornwall

    Bad things are happening in Cornwall. A plague of venomous Portuguese man-of-war creatures – often mistaken for jellyfish – are sprawling across beaches in unusual numbers, presenting a toxic hazard to local people and their pets.The man-of-wars have been sighted on beaches all over the county, including at Penzance, Widemouth Bay near Bude and Praa Sands.

  • Thousands sign petition to keep Piers Morgan on TV
    News
    PA Media: Entertainment

    Thousands sign petition to keep Piers Morgan on TV

    Almost 9,000 people signed a rival petition called for the controversial presenter to be sacked for 'dehumanising' transgender people.

  • Finsbury Park terrorist Darren Osborne attacked with boiling water by fellow prison inmate
    News
    The Independent

    Finsbury Park terrorist Darren Osborne attacked with boiling water by fellow prison inmate

    The far-right extremist who launched the Finsbury Park terror attack has been assaulted by a fellow prison inmate.Darren Osborne had boiling water thrown over his head in HMP Wakefield and had to be treated for burns and blisters.

  • Boy, 14, dies after crashing stolen car in police chase
    News
    Yahoo News UK

    Boy, 14, dies after crashing stolen car in police chase

    Three teenage boys were involved in the car chase, which ended near Wigan on Friday afternoon.

  • UK’s Lightning fighter jets head to US for advanced military trials
    News
    PA Media: UK News

    UK’s Lightning fighter jets head to US for advanced military trials

    It follows successful trials last year with US military Lightning jets.

  • Was the Strictly Come Dancing result fixed?
    Entertainment news

    Was the Strictly Come Dancing result fixed?

    Dev Griffin and Dianne Buswell were unfairly axed, according to fans

  • Stephen Moore obituary
    News
    The Guardian

    Stephen Moore obituary

    Actor whose versatility and experience shone through his many stage, screen and radio roles. It is perhaps ironic that the vastly experienced, smooth as silk, inherently funny stage actor Stephen Moore, who has died aged 81, should be remembered mostly for voicing a robot, the paranoid android Marvin in the original radio series of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Douglas Adams’s hilarious science-fiction adventure began in 1978 and Moore stayed with it through four more series, the television show (still just the voice), the records and the audio books. In a general sense, he was the voice of the show, as he picked off other roles when something different was needed – these included a mouse, a whale, and the ruler of the universe – and recorded the entire run of Hitchhiker books, on his own, for EMI. But even just vocally his range was considerable, as demonstrated in his regular appearances on BBC Radio 4’s Poetry Please, or his leading roles in radio versions of Madame Bovary (with Nicola Pagett and Roger Allam), Dostoevsky’s The Idiot and Marlowe’s Dr Faustus. Then again, on television, where he was first noted in a 1962 version of Jean Anouilh’s Dinner With the Family – “and introducing Stephen Moore” read the cast list headed by Jeremy Brett and Renée Houston – he was as adept in comedy as he was in classic serials. In the 1980s, he was Felicity Kendal’s live-in boyfriend in the first series of Solo written by Carla Lane (his character was thrown out for sleeping with Kendal’s best friend), Adrian Mole’s dad in two series of Sue Townsend’s saga and David Lodge’s flustered academic Philip Swallow in Small World. Later, he appealed to wider audiences as Kevin’s dad in Harry Enfield and Chums (1997-98) and as Eldane, the scaly-skinned leader of the Silurians in Doctor Who (2010). To many of these roles he brought the same brand of casual insouciance that became his trademark over three decades at both the National Theatre and the Royal Shakespeare Company. For Moore, the quietest and least lauded of all leading actors, was a star by stealth, an actor’s actor admired equally by peers and critics. He was tall, rangy, and curiously similar to a walking question mark. His remarkable career embraced the last efflorescence of the Old Vic (1959-61) before the Olivier National supplanted it, the RSC and Royal Court heydays in the 1970s and then the reviving influx of the fringe; he was as much at home, and as charmingly revelatory, in the plays of Alan Ayckbourn as he was in those of Sam Shepard, David Hare and Howard Brenton. At the National he featured significantly in Hare’s brilliant Plenty (1978) and Brenton’s controversial The Romans in Britain (1980), as well as in Ayckbourn’s epic comedies Bedroom Farce (1977) and A Small Family Business (1987). Moore’s grounding was at the Bristol Old Vic and the Central School of Speech and Drama, where he trained and won the Laurence Olivier medal. He was born in Brixton, south London, to the solicitor Stanley Moore and his wife, Mary (nee Bruce-Anderson), and was educated at the Archbishop Tenison’s grammar school in Kennington. After Central (1956-59), he went straight into the Old Vic, where he played William in As You Like It, Slender in The Merry Wives of Windsor, Flute in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Andrew Aguecheek in Twelfth Night. His comic, slightly gauche and tender stage personality was thus established, and he developed further in Jacobean comedy, Dostoevsky’s The Possessed and The Trojan Wars (as Achilles and Polymestor) at Bernard Miles’s Mermaid in Puddle Dock. He then went into regional rep at Windsor and Colchester before returning to Bristol where, under the directorship of Val May, he achieved prominence in The Iceman Cometh and Hedda Gabler, and as Petruchio in The Taming of the Shrew. He appeared with Ralph Richardson and Jill Bennett in John Osborne’s West of Suez at the Royal Court in 1971 and formed a tingling love triangle with Jane Asher and James Bolam in Christopher Hampton’s underrated Treats, which transferred from the Court to the Mayfair in 1976. His television profile sharpened, too, in this decade, with stand-out performances in Tom Stoppard’s 1975 adaptation of Three Men in a Boat (alongside Tim Curry and Michael Palin in Stephen Frears’s film) and as the morose leftwing teacher married to Julie Covington in the first 1976 series of Rock Follies. At the National in the 1980s he was a notable Cassio to Paul Scofield’s magisterial Othello; an insinuating Grand Inquisitor to Michael Gambon’s breakthrough triumph as Brecht’s Galileo; a villainous lank-haired magistrate in Howard Davies’s glorious revival of Dion Boucicault’s The Shaughraun (in which the theatre’s great revolve was properly used for the first time, conjuring the landscapes of County Sligo); and a grinning booby in Richard Eyre’s large-hearted version of Ben Jonson’s Bartholomew Fair, enunciated with relish. In the same period he did not forget the RSC, supporting Judi Dench’s shock-haired Mother Courage as the sardonic chaplain, winning an Olivier best actor award as Torvald in Adrian Noble’s staging of A Doll’s House, succeeding John Thaw as Cardinal Wolsey in Henry VIII (with the title role played by Richard Griffiths) when Davies’s production moved from Stratford-upon-Avon to the Barbican and playing to stylish perfection the worldly-wise cynic Hallam Matthews in a brave revival of John Whiting’s A Penny for a Song. One of Moore’s great abilities was to create a performance of subtlety and nuance and expand into a large arena like the Olivier at the NT without any sign of strain or loss of ease; and this he did as the older Peer Gynt in 1990, though on reflection he felt that he could equally have been entrusted with the younger Peer, whom David Morrissey projected as a Scouse tearaway in Declan Donnellan’s production. In between his last NT appearances – as the Mayor in Ibsen’s An Enemy of the People (with Ian McKellen and Penny Downie) in 1998 and the savagely exasperated Roote in Harold Pinter’s The Hothouse in 2007 – he toured as Colonel Pickering in My Fair Lady and as the inspirational teacher Hector in Alan Bennett’s The History Boys. He was always a reassuring presence on film, even as a military bigwig in Richard Attenborough’s blockbuster war movie A Bridge Too Far (1977) with Dirk Bogarde and Michael Caine, but he was a better fit in a handful of quirky, even eccentric British movies ranging from Lindsay Anderson’s The White Bus (1967) to Christopher Morahan’s Clockwise (1986) and Richard Curtis’s The Boat That Rocked (2009), in which he led a right-wing government trying to close down a pirate radio station run by Bill Nighy and his tempestuous, mid-Atlantic deejay, Philip Seymour Hoffman, channelling Emperor Rosko. Moore was married four times, thrice divorced. He had three children – Robyn, Guy and Hedda – with his first wife, Barbara Mognaz; one, Charlotte, with his second, Celestine Randall; and another, Sophie, with his fourth wife, Noelyn George, who died in 2010. His children survive him. . Stephen Vincent Moore, actor, born 11 December 1937; died 4 October 2019

  • Mass migration from Africa likely as government invests in satellite monitoring of vulnerable countries
    News
    The Telegraph

    Mass migration from Africa likely as government invests in satellite monitoring of vulnerable countries

    Climate change could bring mass migration from Africa and diseases, the UK Space Agency’s Chief Scientist has warned, as he said foreign aid was now being used to fund satellites which monitor vulnerable countries.

  • Domestic rabbits often lead miserable, disease-ridden lives because owners wrongly believe they need minimal care
    News
    The Telegraph

    Domestic rabbits often lead miserable, disease-ridden lives because owners wrongly believe they need minimal care

    Domestic rabbits often lead miserable, disease-ridden lives because their owners wrongly believe they need minimal care and handling, a new study has shown.

  • Neighbours' Shane struggles with more guilt in Mackenzie plot
    News
    Digital Spy

    Neighbours' Shane struggles with more guilt in Mackenzie plot

    He blames himself for Grant's bad behaviour.

  • Former Islamist and far-right extremists unite forces to fight rising hate
    News
    The Independent

    Former Islamist and far-right extremists unite forces to fight rising hate

    In June 2009, Anjem Choudary acolyte Jesse Morton was working with al-Qaeda supporters to spread the call to jihad across America.More than 3,500 miles away, in the British seaside town of Lowestoft, single father Ivan Humble was helping form the English Defence League (EDL).

  • News
    PA Media: Entertainment

    EastEnders star Dean Gaffney axed from Walford

    The actor - Robbie Jackson in Albert Square - had only a few weeks left on his contract.

  • What is the latest customs plan?
    Sky video

    What is the latest customs plan?

    Sky's Sam Coates explores the plan for Northern Ireland as the EU and the UK government head into intense talks.

  • Assad troops enter northeast Syria after Russia-backed deal with Kurds
    News
    The Telegraph

    Assad troops enter northeast Syria after Russia-backed deal with Kurds

    Bashar al-Assad’s forces began entering northeast Syria in large numbers for the first time in years on Monday after the West’s Kurdish allies agreed to a Russian-brokered deal to try to hold off a Turkish onslaught.

  • Did Charles de Gaulle foresee Brexit?
    News
    France 24

    Did Charles de Gaulle foresee Brexit?

    With no end to the Brexit drama in sight, FRANCE 24 goes back to the past to elucidate the present. In 1963, France’s revered President Charles de Gaulle famously said “non” to the UK joining what was then the EEC. For some observers, his arguments for keeping Britain out were prophetic.In November 1962, de Gaulle hosted then British prime minister Harold Macmillan, an Old Etonian with a famously Edwardian style, at the French presidential summer retreat of Rambouillet – an exquisite Renaissance chateau just outside of Paris. Macmillan was desperate to gain de Gaulle’s approval for British entry into the European Economic Community (EEC).De Gaulle convened a shooting party for the very posh prime minister. The French president didn’t himself partake in blood sport, but loudly informed Macmillan every time he missed. “The General”, as de Gaulle is affectionately known for his role as head of the Free French during the Second World War, told his British counterpart that the UK would have to ditch its “special relationship” with the US if it was serious about joining Europe.At one point, the General’s tough stance provoked Macmillan to burst into tears. “This poor man, to whom I had nothing to give, seemed so sad, so beaten,” de Gaulle told his cabinet. “I wanted to put my hand on his shoulder and say to him, as in the Édith Piaf song, ‘ne pleurez pas, milord’ (don’t cry, my lord)”.De Gaulle kept Macmillan in the lurch for a while. Then he announced at a press conference in January 1963 his opposition to British entry into the EEC. He argued that the UK would want to “impose its own conditions” on what were then the bloc’s six countries. The “insular” character of the island nation across the Channel had created a politico-economic “structure” which differed “profoundly” from “that of continental Europeans”, the General postulated.The UK “is maritime; it is bound by trade, by its markets, to the most diverse array of countries – and often the most far-flung”, he went on. “It has a lot of industry and commerce but very little agriculture – and its habits and traditions are very different.”Upon hearing the news Macmillan wrote in his diary: “The French always betray you in the end.”‘A typical de Gaulle statement’In his speech at the press conference, the General made a “typical de Gaulle statement – leaving no room for compromise”, noted Jonathan Fenby, a British historian and author of “The General: Charles De Gaulle and the France He Saved”, in an interview with FRANCE 24.But the French president didn’t just see Britain as culturally, economically and politically distinct from continental Europe, he also feared that the UK’s presence in the EEC would weaken France’s influence. “De Gaulle was determined that France should have the leading role in the European project,” Fenby said. “It must be remembered that his government was carrying out an extensive programme of economic reform and – linked to this – he had forged a partnership with West Germany in which he envisaged France playing the leading role. De Gaulle didn’t want this prospect to be kyboshed by Britain’s entry into the EEC.”De Gaulle also opposed British accession because he feared that the UK’s close relationship with the US would make it a Trojan horse for American influence, Fenby pointed out: “For him, keeping Europe independent from the US was paramount, and he never forgot the strong links between London and Washington – which he saw as acting against France’s interests during the Second World War – and the nuclear accords Macmillan signed with the US in the early ’60s reinforced his suspicions.”A ‘chie-en-lit’In 1967, de Gaulle said “non” again, justifying his veto with the declaration that “to allow England [meaning the UK] in would mean assenting to a lot of pretence, which would be there to hide the destruction of a structure that was built at the cost of so much pain and in the midst of so much hope”.More than half a century later, some see de Gaulle’s views on British distinctness from continental Europe – and ergo the inappropriateness of the UK’s membership in what was then the EEC – as clairvoyance. The view would chime with that of Brexiteers, a fair few of whom see the European project as ill-suited to their country because of what they see as fundamental cultural and political differences with the continent.But Fenby suggested that the context is now very different: “The European Union has evolved a lot since the 1960s and it would be wrong to impose the General’s views on the current community of 27. It should also be noted that the pro-Brexit camp has always refused to recognise the opportunities the EU’s evolution has opened up for the UK.”That didn’t stop the British historian from amusing himself by imagining what de Gaulle would have thought of Brexit: “to use a term he famously deployed a few years later, he would have called the conversation a 'chie-en-lit'” – a phrase indelibly associated with the General, which he used to denounce the 1968 student protests; strictly speaking it means “masquerade” but it also unmistakably sounds like “s*** in bed”.  “De Gaulle would have told the EU to just get on with it and not worry about Britain’s obstinacy and – as he would see it – non-European nature,” Fenby concluded.This article was adapated from the original in French.

  • Sanditon viewers furious with "not very Jane Austen" series finale
    News
    Digital Spy

    Sanditon viewers furious with "not very Jane Austen" series finale

    "Jane Austen would never have written that ending."

  • Game of Thrones director admits final season was ‘really rushed’
    News
    The Independent

    Game of Thrones director admits final season was ‘really rushed’

    Game of Thrones director Neil Marshall has revealed that he agrees with fans who felt the series finale was “really rushed”.The director, who worked on key episodes including “Blackwater” and “The Watchers on the Wall” in the final season of the hit fantasy drama, said he would have taken a “different approach” to the series.