• Seann Walsh jokes about being in bed with Katya Jones following her split from Neil
    News
    Yahoo Celebrity UK

    Seann Walsh jokes about being in bed with Katya Jones following her split from Neil

    Seann Walsh addressed his infamous kiss with the Strictly Come Dancing pro during a stand-up comedy performance at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe.

  • Nigel Farage and the Brexit party savage Boris Johnson's EU negotiations
    News
    Yahoo News UK

    Nigel Farage and the Brexit party savage Boris Johnson's EU negotiations

    The party vowed to fight 'tooth and nail' against any deal that largely retains the Withdrawal Agreement.

  • Emmerdale star on big Robert scenes as he tells Aaron everything
    News
    Digital Spy

    Emmerdale star on big Robert scenes as he tells Aaron everything

    Aaron discovers everything next week.

  • Trump tweets photo of Trump Tower dwarfing tiny houses on Greenland coast
    News
    Yahoo News UK

    Trump tweets photo of Trump Tower dwarfing tiny houses on Greenland coast

    Mr Trump joked on Twitter: “I promise not to do this to Greenland!” The president acknowledged on Sunday that he was “strategically” interested in such a deal, but said it was not a priority of his administration.

  • Parents hold anti-vaping protest outside of Juul headquarters in New York City
    Newsflare

    Parents hold anti-vaping protest outside of Juul headquarters in New York City

    Dozens of parents and anti-vaping advocates held a protest Tuesday (August 20) outside the JUUL offices in Manhattan. Critics want the City Council to restrict the e-cigarette company from selling flavored products, which they say attract kids. Last year, Altria, the parent company of Marlboro-maker Philip Morris USA, bought a 35% stake in Juul. “Kids start with flavored pods,” said 16-year-old Phillip Fuhrman, who is now vape-free after taking his first puff of a JUUL two years ago. “When my mom took my first one away from me and I started to feel the withdrawal symptoms, that was the first time I realized I was addicted.” Stanford University Professor Robert Jackler, an expert in tobacco advertising, testified before Congress earlier this year that Juul’s early promotions — including youthful models, colorful advertising and launch parties across the U.S. — mimicked tactics pioneered by cigarette makers. The group is backing a bill sponsored by City Councilman Mark Levine. Last November, JUUL announced it was pulling its flavored pods from more than 90,000 stores nationwide. Vaping advocates also attended today’s rally to share their perspective.

  • El Salvador Rape Victim Accused Of Stillbirth Murder Is Acquitted
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    HuffPost UK

    El Salvador Rape Victim Accused Of Stillbirth Murder Is Acquitted

    A young rape victim who was suspected of having an abortion and charged withhomicide has been acquitted by a judge at a retrial

  • Tory MPs face a crisis of career, conscience and credibility over no deal
    News
    The Guardian

    Tory MPs face a crisis of career, conscience and credibility over no deal

    ‘If you think leaving without a deal is a disaster, can you really have a clear conscience about staying in the cabinet?’ Nicky Morgan, front, and Amber Rudd. Photograph: Silverhub/Silverhub/REX/ShutterstockPrivileging career prospects over the call of one’s conscience can terminally damage political credibility. That is the message those Conservative MPs working to prevent a no-deal Brexit will want their colleagues to hear when they go back to work in September.Soon our elected representatives will have left the poolside and returned to the faded grandeur of Whitehall. Meanwhile those who stayed in Westminster this August, including the vast majority of ministerial special advisers, have been bracing themselves for the great Brexit battle 2.0. (Actually, it’s more like 10.0 – even giving Windows a run for its money. But never mind.) It’s time to campaign until it is clear to this government that parliament won’t impose this risk on its peopleSo, will the first week of September usher in the mother of all parliamentary showdowns? That will depend in part on the decisions and priorities of those who have spent the summer attempting to reconcile their consciences with the prospect of no deal becoming a reality. Health secretary Matt Hancock managed it. So did cabinet ministers Amber Rudd and Nicky Morgan.The consequences of no deal are now in the public domain, and they are grave. The leaked government dossier on Operation Yellowhammer suggests disruption to supplies of fresh food, fuel and medicine and the possibility of civil unrest. Just “bumps in the road” to Brexit says Michael Gove, the man in charge of no-deal planning.I believe that Boris Johnson’s government is actively working to avoid a deal with the EU. I hope I am wrong. We will soon find out. What is undeniable is that this administration has done a brilliant job of branding and broadcasting its approach. The efficiency and potency with which the “do or die” message has been hammered home is bamboozling even the brave few who have thus far been vocal in their objection to leaving without a deal.So what are the anti-no-dealers actually doing to prevent their nightmare coming true? There is much debate about how the legal requirement to leave on the 31 October can be upended. I’ll leave that to one side. That’s a practical question with a practical answer, and the various options will be played out soon enough. But this is also a question of principles and sticking to them. Or not.Last week there was another leak. The former chancellor and my former boss, Philip Hammond, along with 19 other MPs, wrote to Johnson to remind him of his promise that no deal was an unlikely outcome – “a million to one” in the prime minister’s own words. The letter encouraged him to make good on these odds.All well and good. But we have only two months before a hard Brexit becomes reality. So enough with the epistolary efforts. It’s time for senior Conservatives who know that no deal would be a disaster to get their hands dirty. It’s time to shout the message from the rooftops; to campaign and cajole until it is clear to this government that parliament won’t impose this risk on its people.Last April, parliament successfully forced through an emergency bill to see off the threat of no deal under Theresa May.But I am worried that, when the House of Commons returns in a fortnight, fewer and fewer MPs will muster the courage to speak in favour of blocking no deal and then to organise to prevent it. A majority in the Commons remains opposed to a hard Brexit. But I fear that, on the Tory side, too many may see blocking it as career suicide in the Johnson era.How would we ever be able to trust these senior politicians again, when it would appear that a short summer break was all it took to convert them to the ruthless rhetoric of the prime minister’s approach?Hammond has always said what he thinks. He’s authentically committed to the things he says he believes. As his communications director, my job was hair-raising at times. But it makes his job this September a straightforward one. What about former ministers Rory Stewart, Greg Clark, and David Gauke? Or Scottish Conservatives leader Ruth Davidson? They need now to step into the glare of the spotlight to lend the campaign against no deal some serious firepower.Stewart, Clark and Gauke signed the Hammond letter. I expect they’ll continue to speak out against a hard exit. But they’ll not turn the worm.Davidson may be the key to all this. Less than a week after Johnson was elected leader she made a public commitment that she wouldn’t support no deal. She says she also told Johnson this to his face in their first meeting following his win. Will she be as vociferous and vocal this autumn? I hope so.But the most difficult questions are reserved for those who have chosen to remain inside the bunker. If you think leaving without a deal is a disaster, can you really have a clear conscience about staying in the cabinet?Rudd has told colleagues she’s better able to influence Johnson’s hard Brexit instincts from inside government. But was the prospect of losing a second secretary of state job in such short order also a factor?Rudd has sent mixed signals of late. First she declared that “I will play my part in … arguing strongly for respecting parliamentary sovereignty.” The next morning she doubled down on the no-deal message, writing in the Telegraph: “We will deliver Brexit by the end of October whatever the circumstances.”Morgan’s website states she had concerns about “the uncertainty surrounding a no-deal Brexit,” and has made her views heard on the backbenches. But now, after three years of the UK stuck in a “holding pattern”, she says she “believe[s] we need to get the withdrawal phase concluded”. Careers, consciences and credibility: in the Conservative party this autumn all three will be tested as never before.• Poppy Trowbridge was special adviser to Philip Hammond from September 2016 to July 2019

  • Top grammar schools in the UK according to GCSE league tables
    News
    The Telegraph

    Top grammar schools in the UK according to GCSE league tables

    Two schools are tied neck and neck at the top of the tree when it comes to GCSE performance among grammar schools in the latest school league tables.

  • Once Upon a Time in Hollywood: Charles Manson actor claims Quentin Tarantino cut 'quite a lot' from new movie
    News
    The Independent

    Once Upon a Time in Hollywood: Charles Manson actor claims Quentin Tarantino cut 'quite a lot' from new movie

    The actor who stars as Charles Manson in Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood has claimed the director “cut quite a lot” of “fun” scenes out of the new film.Damon Herriman, who also played the cult leader in Netflix’s Mindhunter, told Entertainment Weekly: “He did cut quite a lot out of the film. The stuff I got to do in that was lighter and more of a fun tone, whereas in Mindhunter, Manson is in jail and he’s bitter and he’s angry at the world.”Herriman was reluctant to elaborate on what else was shot and then cut by Tarantino.“With Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” he said, “it’s hard to talk about in too much detail without referencing another scene that we shot, which I probably shouldn’t talk about.“That may make an appearance at some point and I don’t want to spoil it for people.”He added: “Certainly, with what I shot in total, the direction was more in line with the tone of the particular scene, which is a more humorous scene than anything I did in Mindhunter.”On being cast as Manson twice, Herriman commented: “I’m not complaining because, obviously, it was an opportunity to work with two of the greatest filmmakers of their generation. So, I’m way happier than I am weirded out.”However, Herriman admitted he did have “mixed feelings” about his double casting at first. “I can’t say no to auditioning for Quentin Tarantino, but I also know that it’s highly unlikely that he’s going to cast the same guy who’s already playing this character,” he said. “As it turns out, he didn’t mind.”On whether he would play Manson a third time, he said: “Never say never, but I think that would be highly unlikely and probably very stupid of me… I’ve had my fair share of Manson.”Once Upon a Time in Hollywood has received mixed to positive reviews from critics. Reviewing for The Independent, Clarisse Loughrey gave the film three stars and called it an "unharmonious clash of ideas", while praising the performances of Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Margot Robbie.However, she criticised Tarantino for making Sharon Tate's story "about Rick and Cliff, and everything they represent".

  • Meteor showers to watch out for in 2019, including the Perseids
    News
    The Telegraph

    Meteor showers to watch out for in 2019, including the Perseids

    Get your telescopes and cameras ready as space fans are in for another celestial treat this month. The Perseids, one of the brightest meteor showers of the year, is set to grace our skies, with the chance to see up to 50-100 meteors per hour.

  • Kit Harington discusses Jon Snow’s Game Of Thrones ending
    News
    PA Media: Entertainment

    Kit Harington discusses Jon Snow’s Game Of Thrones ending

    The British actor played the character for eight seasons.

  • As Britain seeks new trade deals, can we learn a lesson from Poldark?
    News
    The Independent

    As Britain seeks new trade deals, can we learn a lesson from Poldark?

    “There has never been such scarcity, could more be done?” asks Demelza in the current series of Poldark. Thankfully for the people of Cornwall, the answer for Ross and Demelza Poldark is, of course, yes.This fifth and final season of the Cornish saga is perhaps the most dramatic and ambitious to date. Rarely have so many huge themes – slavery, racism, poverty, health, education, charity, child labour, decent jobs, mental illness and trauma – been broached. All on top of the usual mine disasters and thwarted love affairs.

  • The world's best stopover cities, from Atlanta to Singapore
    News
    The Independent

    The world's best stopover cities, from Atlanta to Singapore

    Can’t bear the thought of a marathon plane journey? Then breaking the trip into two sections with a stopover might just be the way forward.Pick the right airline, and you can get a city break tagged on to the main trip – and these are 10 of the best options.

  • Jeffrey Epstein signed $577m will two days before death, court documents reveal
    News
    The Independent

    Jeffrey Epstein signed $577m will two days before death, court documents reveal

    Jeffrey Epstein signed a will two days before he killed himself in jail, court records show.Court papers filed in the US Virgin Islands, where Epstein owned two isles, list no details of beneficiaries but valued his estate at more than $577m (£477m), including more than $56m (£46m) in cash.

  • Indian spacecraft now orbiting moon in search for water
    News
    PA Media: Science

    Indian spacecraft now orbiting moon in search for water

    The craft, named Chandrayaan, will later send a lander towards the far side of the moon.

  • Fate of Brexit deal in hands of the EU: Conservative chairman
    News
    Reuters

    Fate of Brexit deal in hands of the EU: Conservative chairman

    The European Union needs to show flexibility over the Irish border "backstop" because the issue of whether Britain leaves the bloc with or without a deal is now mainly up to Brussels, Conservative party chairman James Cleverly said on Tuesday. "The decision as to whether we leave with or without a deal is largely now in the hands of European Union negotiators," Cleverly told Sky News, adding that the EU's insistence on the so-called backstop was the main sticking point in reaching a deal.

  • Emmerdale funeral drama and more in 13 spoiler pictures
    Digital Spy

    Emmerdale funeral drama and more in 13 spoiler pictures

    Megan makes a scene during the service.From Digital Spy

  • Britain now has more electric car charging points than petrol stations
    News
    motor1

    Britain now has more electric car charging points than petrol stations

    Nissan research finds there are now 9,300 "charging locations" across the UK.

  • iPhone users alerted to major security problem with latest iOS update
    News
    The Independent

    iPhone users alerted to major security problem with latest iOS update

    Apple accidentally opened back up a security bug that it had previously fixed, according to security researchers.The issue means that the latest version of the iPhone software, iOS 12.4, is insecure and hackers could find their way into people's phones, experts claim.

  • Claire Ptak and Henry Dimbleby's Leon Happy Baking cookbook review: 'A godsend for amateur bakers'
    News
    The Telegraph

    Claire Ptak and Henry Dimbleby's Leon Happy Baking cookbook review: 'A godsend for amateur bakers'

    Henry Dimbleby, the man behind Leon Restaurants, and Claire Ptak, the baker who created the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s wedding cake, collaborated to write Leon Happy Baking (Hachette UK, £16.99, out now). The book focuses on comfort food – sweet and savoury – with many recipes free of wheat, dairy, and refined sugar. There are even vegan options peppered throughout. The recipes are simple, aimed at beginners and pros alike.

  • Katherine Ryan reckons gossiping runs in her family after finding out about her ancestor
    Entertainment news

    Katherine Ryan reckons gossiping runs in her family after finding out about her ancestor

    She's the latest celebrity to star in Who Do You Think You Are?

  • Scientists work towards swine fever vaccine as virus sweeps China
    News
    PA Media: Science

    Scientists work towards swine fever vaccine as virus sweeps China

    The disease has killed millions of pigs in China and other countries such as Vietnam and Taiwan.

  • News
    Reuters

    Syrian jihadist group says still has fighters in Khan Sheikhoun

    A Syrian jihadist group said on Tuesday rebel fighters had redeployed in the southern part of the town of Khan Sheikhoun and still controlled towns in adjoining area of Hama province, after a war monitor said insurgents had withdrawn from the area.

  • Tory plan to increase pension age to 75 ‘chilling and immoral’
    News
    The Independent

    Tory plan to increase pension age to 75 ‘chilling and immoral’

    Proposals to increase the state pension age to 75 have been branded “chilling and immoral” by former pensions minister Ros Altmann.Baroness Altmann condemned the idea put forward by Tory think-tank the Centre for Social Justice (CSJ) this week to raise the current pension age of 65 to 70 by 2028 and 75 by 2035.