• Snow in London: Capital blanketed after cold snap takes hold as Londoners share their best pictures
    News
    Evening Standard

    Snow in London: Capital blanketed after cold snap takes hold as Londoners share their best pictures

    Londoners have been sharing their best wintry weather pictures after parts of the capital experienced flurries of snow as a cold snap took hold across the country. Excited Londoners shared pictures and video as snow began to fall across the capital, with snowflakes being reported first in Ruislip in the early afternoon before hitting the rest of London. Londoners joked that the capital was likely to grind to a halt after the snow appeared.

  • Speed cameras spotted at the site of Duke of Edinburgh's car crash
    News
    Yahoo News UK

    Speed cameras spotted at the site of Duke of Edinburgh's car crash

    The stretch of the A149 is set to be subject to speed restrictions.

  • Settled status for EU citizens – Q&A with law expert on what it does and doesn't guarantee
    News
    The Conversation

    Settled status for EU citizens – Q&A with law expert on what it does and doesn't guarantee

    The government has abandoned its plan to charge £65 for EU citizens applying for 'settled status' after Brexit – but what does it secure.

  • Haggis out? Scots fear Brexit means going veggie
    News
    Reuters

    Haggis out? Scots fear Brexit means going veggie

    BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Scots with a taste for traditional meat pies or haggis face "enforced vegetarianism" after Brexit, a Scottish government minister warned on Tuesday, as it may starve abattoirs of a vital European workforce.

  • Bad Boys for Life cast, plot and release date: Everything we know about long-awaited action sequel
    News
    The Independent

    Bad Boys for Life cast, plot and release date: Everything we know about long-awaited action sequel

    Not only is there a spin-off TV show titled LA’s Finest – starring Jessica Alba, no less – coming later this year, but next year sees the highly anticipated sequel to 2003’s Bad Boys II, named Bad Boys for Life, finally reach cinemas. While Bad Boys for Life’s release date has moved around a few times, the film looks set to land in cinemas on 17 January, 2020. Will Smith and Martin Lawrence have previously confirmed they are both returning to reprise their roles as detectives Mike Lowrey and Marcus Burnett, respectively.

  • Learning from the past can help us plan a better future
    News
    Evening Standard

    Learning from the past can help us plan a better future

    People have compared what’s happening now to the Suez Crisis, the Second World War and even the Norman Conquest. As chief executive of the British Academy — which promotes the humanities and the social sciences — I believe history can help our politicians make better policies and avoid the potential pitfalls of the past. As a former civil servant I have seen first-hand how knowledge of what has gone before can prepare us for the challenges of the future.

  • Holly Willoughby, Neil & Katya Jones and more celebrities on the red carpet at the NTAs 2019
    Digital Spy

    Holly Willoughby, Neil & Katya Jones and more celebrities on the red carpet at the NTAs 2019

    Check out all of the fashion LIVE from the red carpet. From Digital Spy

  • Rough times for NYC federal workers on 32nd day of shutdown
    AFP UK

    Rough times for NYC federal workers on 32nd day of shutdown

    On the 32nd day of the partial government shutdown, federal workers in New York admit "times are getting rough," while picking up supplies from a pop up food bank organised to help them.

  • UK's courts system 'on its knees' following major IT failure, lawyers' association says
    News
    The Independent

    UK's courts system 'on its knees' following major IT failure, lawyers' association says

    The UK’s courts system is “on its knees” following a major computer outage that has lasted several days, a leading lawyers’ union has said. Legal practitioners have been unable to access court wifi or the secure email service and cases have been adjourned due to a failure of the Ministry of Justice’s (MoJ) IT infrastructure, the Criminal Bar Association (CBA) said. The group’s chairman, Chris Henley QC, blamed “savage cuts to the MoJ budget” for the collapse affecting Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunal Service (HMCTS), while the Bar Council called for “investment in the basics” to prevent the system “shuddering to a halt”.

  • Van drivers in Londonderry were hijacked at gunpoint, police confirm
    News
    PA Ready News UK

    Van drivers in Londonderry were hijacked at gunpoint, police confirm

    Derry's top police officer Gordon McCalmont has condemned those involved, describing the hijacks as 'madness'.

  • Four House of Fraser stores to be saved from closure
    News
    PA Ready News UK

    Four House of Fraser stores to be saved from closure

    An interim deal has been reached with landlord Intu for stores in shopping centres Chapelfield, Lakeside, Metrocentre and Victoria Centre.

  • Super Bowl 2019: New Orleans Saints owner to 'aggressively pursue' rule changes after Los Angeles Rams loss
    News
    The Independent

    Super Bowl 2019: New Orleans Saints owner to 'aggressively pursue' rule changes after Los Angeles Rams loss

    The Saints owner is referring to the decision not to call a penalty on Los Angeles Rams defensive back Nickell Robey-Coleman for his early and high hit on Saints receiver Tommylee Lewis while quarterback Drew Brees' third-down pass was still in the air. A pass interference penalty would have given the Saints a first down inside the Rams 10-yard line with about 1:45 left and allowed New Orleans to run out most of the remaining time left before trying a go-ahead field goal.

  • Barclays weighs 280 redundancies, relocations at Leeds call centre
    News
    Reuters

    Barclays weighs 280 redundancies, relocations at Leeds call centre

    British bank Barclays has warned nearly 300 staff they could face redundancy or relocation from its Millshaw Court call centre in Leeds, northern England, following unspecified "changes to its business". The FTSE 100 lender said it had informed 280 staff at the office that their roles were at risk, with around 115 of the roles possibly relocating to Manchester or Liverpool in northwestern England, and the northeastern English city of Sunderland. Barclays declined to give further reasons for the possible layoffs but British banks have broadly been pursuing deep cost-cutting initiatives in recent years in the face of intensifying competition in UK lending and tighter profit margins.

  • Dar es Salaam's new rapid bus system won international acclaim – but it excludes the poor
    News
    The Conversation

    Dar es Salaam's new rapid bus system won international acclaim – but it excludes the poor

    Bus Rapid Transit has powerful supporters around the world – but shouldn't public transport be designed in the public interest?

  • The world's first completely vegan hotel suite has come to London
    News
    Evening Standard

    The world's first completely vegan hotel suite has come to London

    Swanky food and design studio Bompas & Parr has just unveiled London's first ever 'vegan' hotel suite. Exclusivley decked out in plant-based materials, the studio's creation is a bid to show that veganism goes beyond a simple dining trend and can help 'influence a wider lifestyle choice'. Located inside the 5-star Hilton Bankside Hotel, guests will not find a single trace of leather, wool or feather throughout the suite's stylish interior.

  • Youth football coach was on straight road when he crashed into tree on morning of his sex abuse trial
    News
    The Telegraph

    Youth football coach was on straight road when he crashed into tree on morning of his sex abuse trial

    A former youth football coach and scout whose car crashed into a tree on a straight road the day he was due to go on trial on historical sex abuse charges died of a traumatic brain injury, an inquest has heard.

  • DNA study debunks Rudolf Hess impostor theory
    News
    The Guardian

    DNA study debunks Rudolf Hess impostor theory

    A longstanding conspiracy theory that the Nazi war criminal Rudolf Hess was replaced by a doppelganger in prison has been debunked. For years, there were rumours that the prisoner known as Spandau #7 at the Berlin jail was an impostor substituted in to take the place of the deputy Führer of the Third Reich. The inmate was Hess after all.

  • News
    RFI

    Eye on France: The king is dead. Long live the king

    The Count of Paris, Henri d’Orléans, died yesterday at the age of 85. The French national press is stunned and saddened. If the course of destiny had not been dramatically altered by the original gilets jaunes back in 1789, the year they had the Revolution and France still had a king, then the recently-deceased Henri d'Orléans would, probably, have been that man. I realize that there are a lot of “ifs” and “would bes” and one "probably" in that last sentence, but that’s politics folks, especially in the cloak and dagger world where game of thrones was not a television series. Back then, they played for keeps. It's tough at the top, especially for kinglets Even in royalist circles, Henri was not the inevitable choice for the top job. His claim to the no-longer-existent French throne was based on the fact that he was the direct descendant of Louis XIV’s brother, Phillipe. The recently-departed Henri was also descended from the last king of France, the restoration monarch Louis-Philippe who was nominally in charge between 1830 and 1848. In one of those ironies which keep historians and conspiracy theorists in business, Henri d’Orléans died on the anniversary of the death of Louis XVI, decapitated on 21 January, 1793, with another of our Henri’s relatives, Philippe-Egalité, among those having voted in favour of separating the monarch from his head. Henri, mercifully, escaped the scaffold and died with his silk socks on. He leaves a son, Jean de France, who will, should the need arise, live up to his name and become the next French king. A thoroughly modern monach-in-the-making In a sign of the times, Jean de France announced his father’s death on Twitter, rather than by royal proclamation to be read by town criers. Let no one accuse the House of Burbon of failing to keep up with the times. Jean is obviously sad to see Papa depart, and we offer our sincere condolences. The movement Action Française, which would like to see a return to the old days of royalty, has also expressed its distress. Certain ultra-conservative Catholic groups have reminded us that Count Henri’s last public utterance was a call (also on Twitter) for peaceful protest by the gilets jaunes. The hard-right Catholics have described that speech as “a moving public testament,” though they don’t mention the fact that Henri’s tweet cites Ghandi, hardly the most Catholic of pacifists. An honourable servant of the Republic Born in exile in Belgium, Henri d’Orléans was the second of a gang of eleven children, and had a bit of trouble with his father, who didn’t approve of his son’s divorce, before Henri got his starter’s orders in 1996. France didn’t have an opening in his line of work, but Henri was eminently qualified, just in case. The royal family was not welcome on French soil in the early twentieth century, but they made an exception for Prince Henri so that he could come and study at Sciences Po, Paris. He showed a certain nobility in joining the French army and going to Algeria at the height of the war of independence. Henri d’Orléans had a distinguished military career, as an officer, chief-of-staff, and leader of the first cavalry regiment on the French island of Corsica. He hung up his spurs in 1967 and became a highly successful merchant banker. If you can’t trust the man-who-would-be-king with your sponduliks, then who can you trust? A colourful personal past Henri’s wives sound like they were baptized for the job. His first missus was Marie-Thérèse de Wurtemberg, and she was followed by the no-less resonant Micaela Cousino Quinones de Leon. Blood hardly gets bluer than that. Just to sort out the succession question. Henri’s son, Jean d’Orléans is the new man in line for only one group of royalists. The other nostalgics for kingdom gone support the claims of the surviving first-born in the Capetian line, Louis of Anjou, who was born in Spain and has double nationality. He also has embarrassing links to Franco, who was his grand-uncle, and Louis has publicly regretted the way in which contemporary Spain is gradually erasing the memory of the general-dictator. That’s bad for Louis' image. The Spaniards do, though, have a king. That’s promising.

  • It takes an East German spy to follow the plot twists in Brexit endgame
    News
    Evening Standard

    It takes an East German spy to follow the plot twists in Brexit endgame

    The Brexit endgame is both very complicated and extremely simple. One is that Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement, tweaked, amended, fudged, stretched and yet recognisable as a process that allows Britain to leave the EU and yet stay close to it, finally gets through the Commons. The third is that we rip it up and start again — either via a second referendum or a general election.

  • Sniffer dog Scamp has £25k bounty placed on his head by criminals after detecting £6m of illegal tobacco in five years, claims owner
    News
    The Telegraph

    Sniffer dog Scamp has £25k bounty placed on his head by criminals after detecting £6m of illegal tobacco in five years, claims owner

    A sniffer dog has had a £25,000 bounty placed on its head by criminals because it is so good at its job, its owner has claimed.

  • P&O to change flag of UK ships to Cyprus ahead of Brexit
    News
    Reuters

    P&O to change flag of UK ships to Cyprus ahead of Brexit

    British ferry and shipping freight operator P&O will shift the registration of its UK vessels to Cyprus ahead of Britain's departure from the European Union, in part to keep its tax arrangements in the bloc, the company said on Tuesday. P&O currently has six UK-registered ships operating on the English Channel route to France, although it announced last month it was moving two of those to the Cyprus registry and one has already been transferred. All commercial ships have to be registered, or flagged, with a country partly to comply with safety and environmental regulations.

  • A new generation takes up the hunt for Dead Sea Scrolls
    News
    Reuters

    A new generation takes up the hunt for Dead Sea Scrolls

    In the cliffs high above the Dead Sea archaeologists chip away with pick axes, hoping to repeat one of the most sensational discoveries of the last hundred years - the finding of the Dead Sea Scrolls. The scrolls, a collection of manuscripts, some more than 2,000 years old, were first found in 1947 by local Bedouin in the area of Qumran, about 20 km east of Jerusalem. Recent finds have stirred fresh excitement however, and archaeologists are probing higher and deeper than before.

  • Drake UK tour 2019: How to get tickets for Assassination Vacation arena shows
    News
    The Independent

    Drake UK tour 2019: How to get tickets for Assassination Vacation arena shows

    Drake has announced details of his UK tour Assassination Vacation.

  • Gemma Collins thanks Piers Morgan for support following feud with Jason Gardiner
    News
    Yahoo Celebrity UK

    Gemma Collins thanks Piers Morgan for support following feud with Jason Gardiner

    The Only Way Is Essex star has divided opinion over her public feud with Jason Gardiner.