• Erdogan’s ethnic cleansing of the Kurds is still happening now – and we have Trump to thank
    News
    The Independent

    Erdogan’s ethnic cleansing of the Kurds is still happening now – and we have Trump to thank

    Mass expulsion or the physical extermination of an entire ethnic or religious community – ethnic cleansing – is usually treated by the media in one of two different ways: either it receives maximum publicity as a horror story about which the world should care and do something about, or it is ignored and never reaches the news agenda.It appeared at first that the ethnic cleansing of the Kurds by Turkey after its invasion of northern Syria on 9 October would belong to the first category. There was angry condemnation of the forced displacement of 190,000 Kurds living close to the Syrian-Turkish border as Turkish soldiers, preceded by the Syrian National Army (SNA), in reality ill-disciplined anti-Kurdish Islamist militiamen, advanced into Kurdish-held areas. Videos showed fleeing Kurdish civilians being dragged from their cars and shot by the side of the road and reporters visiting hospitals saw children dying from the effects of white phosphorus that eats into the flesh and had allegedly been delivered in bombs or shells dropped or fired by the advancing Turkish forces.

  • Nigel Farage’s one-man alliance has already fallen apart
    News
    The Independent

    Nigel Farage’s one-man alliance has already fallen apart

    Your regular reminder that, in just a few weeks time, somebody really will win this election.Will it be Boris Johnson, who was today unable to visit a bakery because too many protestors had gathered outside to tell him to go away?

  • 'Last of the Summer Wine' actress Jean Fergusson dies aged 74
    News
    Yahoo Celebrity UK

    'Last of the Summer Wine' actress Jean Fergusson dies aged 74

    The actor, who died on Thursday morning, starred as Marina on the popular show for 25 years.

  • Yorkshire flood victims caught escaping in van filled with wet cannabis plants
    News
    Yahoo News UK

    Yorkshire flood victims caught escaping in van filled with wet cannabis plants

    Police intercepted a van while it was transporting the wet plants from a factory which had been flooded in Worksop, Nottingham.

  • Tamzin Outhwaite responds to 'EastEnders' exit after Mel Owen is killed off: 'I could not feel more proud'
    News
    Yahoo Celebrity UK

    Tamzin Outhwaite responds to 'EastEnders' exit after Mel Owen is killed off: 'I could not feel more proud'

    She first joined the soap in 1998 but her character has now met a grisly end.

  • Anthony Joshua vs Andy Ruiz 2: LIVE stream, UK start time, undercard, fight prediction and betting odds
    News
    Evening Standard

    Anthony Joshua vs Andy Ruiz 2: LIVE stream, UK start time, undercard, fight prediction and betting odds

    Anthony Joshua is out to reclaim his world heavyweight titles when he and Andy Ruiz Jr meet in the most eagerly anticipated rematch of the year.After taking the fight on four weeks’ notice, Ruiz stunned the boxing world last June as he knocked down Joshua four times en route to claiming the IBF, WBO and WBA (Super) titles on another famous night at New York’s famed Madison Square Garden.

  • VW ID.3 electric motor is so compact it fits in a sports bag
    News
    motor1

    VW ID.3 electric motor is so compact it fits in a sports bag

    From 2023 on, Volkswagen intends to produce 1.4 million of similar electric drive units annually.

  • Mars attacks! Big night for Sunday TV as War of the Worlds hits screens
    News
    The Guardian

    Mars attacks! Big night for Sunday TV as War of the Worlds hits screens

    Mars attacks! Big night for Sunday TV as War of the Worlds hits screens. BBC series up against the return of Netflix drama The Crown and ITV’s I’m a Celebrity

  • One dead and 19 injured in serious crash between minibus and car in Cambridgeshire
    News
    Yahoo News UK

    One dead and 19 injured in serious crash between minibus and car in Cambridgeshire

    More than 20 firefighters were sent to the scene.

  • I'm a Celebrity 2019 line-up: Two more stars 'to enter' jungle alongside Adele Roberts and Caitlyn Jenner
    News
    The Independent

    I'm a Celebrity 2019 line-up: Two more stars 'to enter' jungle alongside Adele Roberts and Caitlyn Jenner

    Two additional celebrities will reportedly join this year’s series of I’m a Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here! days after it begins.Earlier this week, the 2019 line-up of ITV's successful reality series was unveiled, featuring American television personality Caitlyn Jenner, Good Morning Britain presenter Kate Garraway, Girls Aloud singer Nadine Coyle and retired footballer Ian Wright.

  • Khamenei: Iran not calling for elimination of Jews, wants non-sectarian Israel
    News
    Reuters

    Khamenei: Iran not calling for elimination of Jews, wants non-sectarian Israel

    Iran is not calling for the elimination of the Jewish people, but believes people of all religions should decide Israel's future, Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said on Friday. Since its Islamic Revolution in 1979, Iran has refused to recognise Israel and has backed militant Palestinian groups. Israel has long accused Iran of seeking its destruction and regards Tehran as its main enemy in the Middle East.

  • Hamilton moved by Alonso, Dennis text messages
    News
    motor1

    Hamilton moved by Alonso, Dennis text messages

    Lewis Hamilton says it was "pretty amazing" that he got congratulatory text messages from former teammate Fernando Alonso and old McLaren boss Ron Dennis after winning his sixth Formula 1 world title.

  • Putin: Russia welcomes troop disengagement in Ukraine
    News
    Reuters

    Putin: Russia welcomes troop disengagement in Ukraine

    Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Thursday that Moscow welcomed the disengagement of Ukrainian forces and pro-Russian separatists at two flash points in eastern Ukraine. Speaking to reporters at a BRICS summit in Brazil, Putin said he did not currently have plans to meet Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy before a four-way international summit on Ukraine.

  • Paul Hollywood defends his decisions amid criticism from Bake Off fans
    News
    PA Media: Entertainment

    Paul Hollywood defends his decisions amid criticism from Bake Off fans

    The TV star and baker said that viewers at home are unaware of taste and smell when it comes to judging bakes.

  • Hollyoaks' Ste Hay has surprise kiss with Azim Desai
    News
    Digital Spy

    Hollyoaks' Ste Hay has surprise kiss with Azim Desai

    He's facing serious trouble going into the double bill.

  • Boris Johnson: The Tories must do better on the NHS
    PA Media: Video

    Boris Johnson: The Tories must do better on the NHS

    Boris Johnson has said the Tories “have got to do better” on the NHS after key figures showed the service was performing at the worst level on record. Speaking on BBC Breakfast, the Prime Minister – who has made the NHS a key battleground in the election – said they had to do more. Must Credit BBC Breakfast

  • Spacewatch: Boeing proposes direct flights to moon in 2024
    News
    The Guardian

    Spacewatch: Boeing proposes direct flights to moon in 2024

    US corporation says its lunar lander concept would reduce ‘complexity and risk’ of Nasa mission. The American aerospace corporation Boeing has proposed a lunar lander to Nasa that it claims would reduce the “complexity and risk” of returning astronauts to the surface of the moon in 2024. Nasa’s original plan was that astronauts would launch from Earth and dock with a space station in lunar orbit before transferring to a lander. It even awarded the first contracts to build the Lunar Gateway in May. Boeing’s lander concept would bypass the Lunar Gateway station, allowing astronauts arriving from Earth direct access to the moon’s surface. The concept is similar to the Apollo lunar landing missions of the 1960s. Boeing says its lander would still be capable of docking with the Lunar Gateway if needed. The lander includes technologies developed for Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft, which will make its first orbital flight test to the International Space Station next month. Nasa has received a number of other lunar lander proposals, and will award contracts to two teams once the proposals have been fully evaluated. The space agency has yet to say how much the 2024 landings will cost. As a result, the Artemis lunar landing programme is not yet fully funded.

  • Nadine Coyle: I haven't spoken to the rest of Girls Aloud for six years
    News
    Yahoo Celebrity UK

    Nadine Coyle: I haven't spoken to the rest of Girls Aloud for six years

    The singer hasn't talked to most of her bandmates since Girls Aloud split.

  • Former 'I'm A Celebrity' contestant Iain Lee says show's aftercare is 'inadequate'
    News
    Yahoo Celebrity UK

    Former 'I'm A Celebrity' contestant Iain Lee says show's aftercare is 'inadequate'

    The presenter said he "went a little nuts" after appearing on the ITV competition, but not as a "direct result" of the show.

  • 'CVs at bottom of pile': Britons in EU say Brexit is taking its toll
    News
    The Guardian

    'CVs at bottom of pile': Britons in EU say Brexit is taking its toll

    British citizens in countries including Spain, Germany and Luxembourg say employers have been reluctant to employ them because of a lack of clarity on Brexit. Photograph: Bombaert Patrick/AlamyPast 40, and nearly five years after he arrived in Madrid, John Halliday is moving back to the UK and in with his parents. He had “nowhere else to go”, he says: Brexit had cost him his job and made other Spanish employers reluctant to hire Britons.“Frankly, I don’t blame them,” says Halliday. “The Spanish government has moved to protect UK citizens’ rights. But businesses are way too busy to follow all this. They worry: will this person need a permit, how long will that take, what will it cost?”The 137 companies in Madrid to which Halliday has applied since he was let go earlier this year “with real regret” by the global finance firm he was working for plainly decided “they’d rather not take the risk. And I understand them. I’d do the same.”Across the EU, British citizens are starting to face similar difficulties. Not all: many have signed new contracts without a hitch. But others say that three years of confusion and doubt among EU employers about the rights of British workers after Brexit are taking their toll. ‘Nothing can fully replicate free movement’“Brexit hasn’t happened yet and British citizens living and working in the EU are already suffering the consequences,” says Laura Shields, the spokeswoman for the British in Europe lobby group, for whom Halliday’s experience is “no surprise at all”.For employers, “no candidate is so special that you look at a pile of CVs and say: ‘Hey, let’s take a big risk with that one,’” Shields says. “This is what ending free movement into Britain means: barriers going up for Britons wanting to work in that enormous great market on our doorsteps.”The risk of no deal, which would leave 1.3 million British nationals in the EU – 80% of them of working age or younger – facing a postcode lottery of 27 unilateral solutions for residency rights, social security, healthcare and recognition of qualifications, has now receded until 31 January, although it will return.Boris Johnson’s renegotiated withdrawal deal, if it is ratified, does secure basic residency and social security rights, guaranteeing the freedom to move and live within the EU during the transition period plus the right to stay when it ends, and to apply for permanent residence after five years.But the freedom of British citizens living in one EU country to move at will within the bloc, as they can now, and the right of all those who leave the UK after Brexit to live and work in the EU at all, are subject to any future agreement – and will depend on the rules Britain applies to EU citizens coming to the UK.“We have absolutely no idea what the regime will be like unless and until the future relationship is actually agreed,” says Shields. “Will there be visa-free working? No one knows. There’ll certainly have to be some kind of permit system. And nothing can fully replicate free movement.”In the meantime, anecdotal evidence suggests that continuing uncertainty about the exact status of British nationals on the continent after Brexit is already prompting some European employers to steer clear. “People are being turned down because they may soon not be EU citizens,” Shields says. ‘If you have 10 CVs from around Europe, why look at a Brit?’In Germany, Megan Thornton, who has held a succession of jobs in sales, customer service and travel consultancy since moving to Berlin in 2013, suddenly found her CV was being “completely ignored” when she started looking for a new post last year.“Either they didn’t respond at all, or it was an instant no,” she says. “I’d never had trouble finding work in Berlin; quite the reverse. I had the right skills and experience. One company finally explained it couldn’t accept candidates who needed a work permit. I said I didn’t: I was still an EU citizen. I never heard back.”Thornton has since applied for, and been granted, permanent residence in Germany. Straightaway, she secured a string of interviews and, last week, a new job.A similar experience greeted a British IT expert who moved to Luxembourg in 2017 with his wife, after she was recruited to a new job there from the UK. The couple, who asked not to be named, had planned for him to spend a year at home with their young children before he started looking for work, he said.“Quite soon after that, I was offered a great job with Euratom, the European atomic energy agency – we got to choosing the company car,” he says. “Then, overnight, they changed their mind. The recruiter told me afterwards they couldn’t get anyone to sign off on me because of the uncertainty over my future status.”Since then, he says, things had got to the point where “we nearly gave up and went home. We’d budgeted for two salaries. I must have sent 100 CVs and got maybe five responses. I’ve now spoken to a lot of people, a lot of agencies, and the general perception is: if you have 10 CVs from around Europe, why look at a Brit?”This simply reflects “a wish to avoid a hassle and a risk you don’t need”, he says. “Firms here are used to hiring Japanese employees. They know the rules. But Brits are now an unknown. If you’re an Italian hiring here, you read a headline, hear something on the radio … You don’t have the time or the inclination. You play safe.” ‘British contractors are at the bottom of the pile’Daniel Hibbs-Woodings has encountered the same difficulty. A highly qualified and experienced social housing professional who had previously studied and lived in Germany, he followed his German partner to Cologne in February.“Property management jobs are plentiful here,” Hibbs-Woodings says. “I sent off 50 applications and got no replies. One filed online was rejected within 29 minutes. I knew I was instantly employable for all these jobs. I was stumped.”Then he asked a recruitment agency to put him forward. Stripped of personal details such as name and nationality, his anonymised candidacy attracted instant interest from a number of employers. Once they had seen his full CV, however, none subsequently followed through.Chris Williams, a technical contractor based in Spain, was told that no UK contractors would be considered ‘until Brexit has been finalised’. Photograph: Supplied“The harsh reality is that if employers have a choice, most will not go for someone with an entirely uncertain visa status,” says Hibbs-Woodings, who finally found a job outside his field for which he is substantially overqualified. “It could be a problem for many – you can only apply for permanent residence in Germany after five years.”The difficulties for contractors working across several European countries are even more complex. Chris Williams, a senior independent technical contractor based in Spain, is currently working for Airbus on a major international project to install new military communications equipment in Nato bases across Europe.He accepted the work after being told flatly by Galileo, the European global satellite navigation system, that no UK contractors would be considered “until Brexit has been finalised and we know exactly what the new rules are. And that applies to some extent all over: British contractors are at the bottom of the pile.”Williams has already had to complete different formalities in Spain, the Netherlands and Belgium to be granted a temporary right to continue functioning as a provider of cross-border services. Next year, when he will be working in many more counties, he has no idea what the situation will be.“My contract is with Airbus France, and under French contract law it is my responsibility to be aware of and comply with all the rules and regulations for third-country nationals working in EU countries,” he says. “It’s very hard indeed to work out exactly what I’m going to have to do.” ‘No one knows whether Brexit will be a problem’‘French employers are asking whether Brexit will be a problem,’ says Lily Hall, a seasonal ski school worker. Photograph: SuppliedIn France, Lily Hall, an office manager for a ski school, is increasingly concerned about work after Brexit. She moved to France with her parents in 1997, aged four, and for the past six years has been a seasonal employee with French companies contracted by British tour operators to look after their clients in Val d’Isère.“French employers are now seriously asking about whether Brexit will be a problem, and asking for papers,” she says. “I tell them no, but the truth is no one knows. My application for citizenship has been turned down once already because as a seasonal worker, I don’t have a permanent address in Savoie, where I work.”Back in Madrid, Halliday said he and five other British nationals working for the same multinational were let go “because it was a highly time-sensitive project, running to a very tight schedule, and we represented a potential issue they could not afford”.Hoping some Brexit clarity would emerge, he and his Spanish partner paid three months’ rent upfront to extend the lease on their flat to mid-October. “Of course, it didn’t,” he says. “And paying the rent in advance pretty much cleared us out. We’re going back to our parents’ to sit out the next few months.”Some names have been changed or abbreviated

  • Sydney university students urged to leave Hong Kong
    News
    The Guardian

    Sydney university students urged to leave Hong Kong

    University writes to students on exchange in Hong Kong as campuses become focus of battles between police and protesters. The University of Sydney has urged Australian students on exchange in Hong Kong to return home as pro-democracy protests intensify on university campuses, the ABC is reporting. The university has written to students after Hong Kong University and other institutions suspended classes for the last few weeks of semester. The ABC obtained an email that said the safety of students was of “utmost concern and based on all the information available to us, and in light that HKU has now suspended/cancelled the semester, the University of Sydney requires you to depart HK immediately and make your way back to Australia”. “If you have already left HK, please let me know where you are now,” it says. “If you need assistance and advice on how to depart HK, please let me know and USYD will assist you.” Universities have this week become a focus of battles between riot police and anti-government demonstrators demanding greater democracy. On Tuesday police raided the Chinese University of Hong Kong, setting off violent clashes and a swell of criticism. Police have fired tear gas and rubber bullets at protesters in recent days. Protesters have brought supplies including petrol bombs and bows and arrows, international media has reported. On Thursday students from Europe as well as mainland China and Taiwan were leaving the city after a night of clashes that resulted in several serious injuries, including a fractured skull to a 15-year-old boy and an elderly worker who was struck by an object during a clash between protesters and residents. Australia expressed its concern over the escalating violence this week, with the foreign minister, Marise Payne, calling for restraint from all sides. “We reiterate our view that it is crucial for all sides – police and protesters – to exercise restraint and take genuine steps to de-escalate tensions,” she said in a statement. University students have been permitted to complete their courses and exams online. The University of Sydney said in a statement: “The safety of our students is paramount. “This morning, following announcements by certain universities in Hong Kong that they are suspending classes for second semester, we wrote to our affected students advising them to return home.”

  • Aaron Carter taken to hospital in Florida, mother confirms
    News
    The Independent

    Aaron Carter taken to hospital in Florida, mother confirms

    Aaron Carter has been taken to hospital in Florida, his mother has confirmed.The former teen idol and brother of Backstreet Boys singer Nick Carter is seen with his eyes closed and wrapped in a blanket in a hospital bed, in a photograph published to his Instagram account.

  • Emma Barton opens up about getting Anton Du Beke past Blackpool on Strictly
    News
    PA Media: Entertainment

    Emma Barton opens up about getting Anton Du Beke past Blackpool on Strictly

    The EastEnders star said that getting to Blackpool in the show was her ultimate goal, but that she would like to progress even more for her partner.

  • Children in Need 2019: 7 things you need to know, from the presenters to special guests
    News
    The Independent

    Children in Need 2019: 7 things you need to know, from the presenters to special guests

    Children in Need is back for its 39th year, bringing a whole new host of celebrities together to help raise money for disadvantaged children and young people across the UK.The 2018 programme raised a record-breaking £50,168,562, meaning Children in Need has brought in over £1bn since it began the annual fundraiser in 1980.

  • Girl, 2, misdiagnosed with 'viral infection' actually has extremely rare form of cancer
    News
    Yahoo News UK

    Girl, 2, misdiagnosed with 'viral infection' actually has extremely rare form of cancer

    The parents of two-year-old Isla Chapman were told that she had a virus - but later discovered she had acute myeloid leukaemia.