10 nostalgic childhood sweets that Scots love but dentists hate

Scotland has long had a love affair with sweet treats
-Credit: (Image: Reach PLC)


Scots have a legendary fondness for sugary treats, with many childhood memories involving gorging on our best-loved sweeties.

While some classic confectionery is, tragically, no longer available - many of these old favourites can still be picked up in stores across the country.

If you've spent any part of your life in Scotland or have relatives who are Scottish, these sweet tr will surely trigger some delicious nostalgia.

Soor Plooms
Soor plooms have long been hated by dentists
Soor plooms have long been hated by dentists -Credit:Flickr

Small, spherical, and bright green, these boiled sweets were always packed with sweet and sour flavours strong enough to have you gurning as you sucked them.

These 'sour plums' were reportedly first made in the 14th century to commemorate a battle near Galashiels.

Irn-Bru bars
Irn-Bru Bars are, sadly, no longer available
Irn-Bru Bars are, sadly, no longer available -Credit:Daily Record

Merging two Scottish favourites - Irn-Bru and sweeties - was always destined to be a success. These tangy, chewy bars were bursting with flavour - and colour.

Despite the name, they were not produced by Barr's - with the soft drink firm licensing out the flavour and name to the company behind Wham bars.

Tragically, that business has since folded and Barr's do not have the recipe - so the bars are no more.

Tablet
Tablet is packed with sugary goodness
Tablet is packed with sugary goodness -Credit:Reach PLC

This crumbly piece of heaven was one of the biggest highlights of visits to granny's house. Its high sugar content and tricky preparation meant it was treated like gold-dust - and good recipes were always handed down the generations.

Tablet can still be found in many shops, at lots of bake sales, and even some traditional pubs - and it is one of Scotland's best-loved sweet treats, for children and adults alike.

Tea cakes
Tunnock's Tea Cakes have been a favourite for decades
Tunnock's Tea Cakes have been a favourite for decades -Credit:Daily Record

No conversation about Scottish sweets could be complete without mentioning Tunnock's. The family firm has been producing some of Scotland's best-loved snacks for generations.

The tea cakes have a fluffy marshmallow filling coated in a chocolate shell and displayed vibrantly in their red and silver foil wrapping.

The delicious round morsels just pip caramel wafers and caramel logs for us thanks to their starring role in the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games opening ceremony.

Creamola Foam
Creamola Foam was a science experiment crossed with a soft drink
Creamola Foam was a science experiment crossed with a soft drink -Credit:Daily Record

Creamola Foam was a colourful tin filled with flavoured crystals that, when mixed with water, produced a fizzy and foaming soft drink in raspberry, orange, lemon or cola flavours.

Originating from Glasgow in the 1950s, it combined the excitement of a science experiment with a tasty beverage, making it a hit with children. Although the plug was pulled on the drink in the 1990s, imitations like Krakatoa Foam are still available.

Edinburgh Rock

Unlike its better known cousin from Brighton, Edinburgh Rock boasts a softer, more crumbly consistency - which we, obviously, think is far superior.

Named for the dormant volcano on which the capital's castle is perched, the colourful sweet treats - often packaged in a neat, tartan box - was reportedly created in the 19th Century by the acclaimed 'Sweetie Sandy'.

Empire biscuits
A change of name didn't halt the popularity of the empire buscuit
Edinburgh Rock is different from its seaside namesake

Known as the German biscuit until the First World War, this rebranded treat has been a Scottish favourite for generations.

Unlike tablet, empire biscuits are fairly simple to make - and the ingredients are pretty cheap too - so you have a good chance of making a tasty batch at home. Alternatively, most supermarkets, cafes, or corner shops will have plenty in stock.

Highland Toffee
Highland Toffee bars were once shipped worldwide
A change of name didn't halt the popularity of the empire buscuit -Credit:Joy Skipper/Getty

Made by the company behind Irn-Bru Bars, the famous 'Coo Candy' easily stands out as one of Scotland's most iconic candies.

Distinguishable by its Hielan' Coo logo and tartan-trimmed packaging, this delightful toffee slab was distributed worldwide at the peak of its popularity.

Macaroon
Macaroon bars pack much more of a punch than French macarons
Highland Toffee bars were once shipped worldwide -Credit:Daily Record

Not to be mixed up with the posh French macarons, a Scottish macaroon is a much more down-to-earth treat.

Crafted using mashed potato, icing sugar, chocolate and toasted coconut, they were reportedly invented by Lee's founder John J Lees and are a delightful burst of coconuty sweetness.

Lucky Tatties
Tobermory Tatties boasted a 'treasure' inside each pack
Macaroon bars pack much more of a punch than French macarons -Credit:Daily Record

Tobermory Tatties got their nickname because some original versions contained a charm or toy inside them. However, they are more fondly remembered for their delicious cinnamon flavour.

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