How That '90s Show connects to the original

·2-min read
Photo credit: Fox/The Carsey-Werner Company - Fox
Photo credit: Fox/The Carsey-Werner Company - Fox

From The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air to Game of Thrones, The Walking Dead to Worzel Gummidge, taking a popular title and spinning it into something fresh isn't new, but it's certainly never been more prevalent. And popular US sitcom That '70s Show, which already has one spin-off (That '80s Show) and a British remake (Days Like These) to its name, has inspired yet another offshoot.

That '90s Show will kick off in 1995 and, like the first series, will be set in Wisconsin, with Debra Jo Rupp and Kurtwood Smith reprising their roles as Kitty and Red Forman.

Had the married couple decided to move to Florida – a decision they were mulling over in '70s' final season – it could have changed the direction of the series, but we're heading back to where it all began, which is music to our ears.

Photo credit: FOX - Getty Images
Photo credit: FOX - Getty Images

The narrative will revolve around a female protagonist called Leia, who is the daughter of Eric Forman (Topher Grace) and Donna Pinciotti (Laura Prepon). She is staying with her grandparents for the summer in the fictional town of Point Place.

"Sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll never dies, it just changes clothes," reads the official synopsis.

Photo credit: FOX
Photo credit: FOX

No other cast members have been announced, but many of the following are expected to feature, either in guest roles or full-time: Mila Kunis (Jackie Burkhart), Ashton Kutcher (Michael Kelso), Wilmer Valderrama (Fez), Josh Meyers (Randy Pearson), Don Stark (Bob Pinciotti) and Tommy Chong (Leo).

Sadly, Lisa Robin Kelly, who played Laurie, and Tanya Roberts, who starred as Midge Pinciotti, have both since died.

Danny Masterson, who appeared as Steven Hyde, has been charged with three counts of rape – accusations which he has denied – and is awaiting trial.

Photo credit: FOX
Photo credit: FOX

The popularity of That '70s Show saw it rack up eight seasons and a whopping 200 episodes whereas the followup and its Luton-based redo only managed one outing apiece – so there's no guarantee this spinoff will catch fire.

Bonnie Turner and Terry Turner, who created the original, are heading up the series, alongside their daughter Lindsay Turner and Gregg Metler, who worked on That '70s Show. Rupp and Smith are also exec-producing.

There's no air date currently on the table, but the ten shiny new episodes are set to air on Netflix. All eight seasons of the original were previously available to stream on the platform, but they were removed in September last year.

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