Adil Ray asks minister if he would send Jesus to Rwanda in GMB clash

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Adil Ray asks minister if he would send Jesus to Rwanda in GMB clash
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Good Morning Britain presenter Adil Ray has clashed with a government minister over plans to send asylum seekers to Rwanda.

The broadcaster, 47, launched into a full scale attack when quizzing Greg Hands about the new scheme asking: “Would you send Jesus to Rwanda?”

During the interview, he said: “Mr Hands, here we are celebrating Easter this weekend, the life and times of Jesus Christ, who was himself a refugee.

“Under this scheme, your government’s scheme, if he arrived in the UK today, Jesus will be sent to Rwanda. Is that right? Would you send Jesus to Rwanda?”

In the clash, the business minister responded by saying it was a “ludicrous question”.

He said: “We’re 2000 years later and over 28,000 people have made an illegal journey from France to the UK, between two entirely safe countries, 27 people have died. It’s 2000 years after the Easter story.”

The altercation led some viewers to criticise Mr Ray as they branded the line of questioning as “stupid” and “ridiculous”.

Under the new scheme, launched by Home Secretary Priti Patel last week, migrants will be transported to Rwanda where they can apply to settle.

Those who are rejected by the Rwandan government will be deported.

The first migrants could be sent to Rwanda on a chartered flight as early as May but there may be delays with the government anticipating legal challenges against the partnership.

Over the weekend, the Archbishop of Canterbury became the latest figure to denounce the scheme as he said it raised “serious ethical questions” during his Easter Sunday sermon.

Justin Welby said the government was “subcontracting our responsibilities” and he said the plans cannot “stand the judgment of God”.

This led Jacob Rees-Mogg to say that Archbishop of Canterbury was “mistaken” about the new policy.

Speaking on Radio 4’s The World This Weekend programme, he said: “I think he misunderstands what the policy is trying to achieve, and that it isn’t an abandonment of responsibility, it is in fact a taking on of a very difficult responsibility.”

More than 160 charities and campaign groups have denounced the plans, calling them “shamefully cruel” and urging for them to be axed.

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