Afternoon Briefing: Affordable housing towers proposed in Edgewater and Logan Square

Good afternoon, Chicago.

The Illinois Supreme Court has agreed to hear an appeal from Jussie Smollett, the former “Empire” actor whose convictions for staging a hate crime caused fevered international media attention.

This means that the case, which has continued as Smollett fights his convictions, will carry on a little longer.

Here’s what else is happening today. And remember, for the latest breaking news in Chicago, visit chicagotribune.com/latest-headlines and sign up to get our alerts on all your devices.

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Measles outbreak in Chicago: What to know about the virus

Though most vaccinated people have close to zero chance of contracting the virus, here’s what to know about the disease. Read more here.

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Edgewater and Logan Square could see new affordable housing towers as nonprofit developer spreads its wings

Bickerdike Redevelopment Corp. wants to launch the construction of an 11-story, 90-unit building at 5853 N. Broadway in Edgewater one block south of the Thorndale stop on the CTA’s Red Line. Read more here.

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Brad Underwood’s intense ways invite fan scrutiny, but his Illinois players see a method in the madness

The Brad Underwood you see looking like a mad man on your flat-screen TV isn’t necessarily the guy the Illinois men’s basketball players know. Read more here.

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Hidden glass Easter eggs add to the beauty of Oregon’s Wallowa County, a muse for artists and outdoor enthusiasts

Stirling Webb is a 47-year-old glass artist whose creations include hand-blown vases, drinking vessels, ornaments — and eggs. Whimsical, colorful glass eggs. Read more here.

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Texas’ migrant arrest law is on hold for now under latest court ruling

The 2-1 ruling late Tuesday from a three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will likely prevent enforcement of the law until a final decision on its merits, either by the 5th Circuit or the U.S. Supreme Court. Read more here.

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