Alex Goy tells the tale of his Morgan 3 Wheeler in new film

feedback@motor1.com (Dominik Wilde)
Alex Goy tells the tale of his Morgan 3 Wheeler in new film

One of Britain's best-known enthusiasts tells the tale of one of Britain's best enthusiast cars.

For some cars are tools used for getting from A to B. For others, they're much much more than that. They're a love, a passion, and they're much more than metal, plastic, and rubber.

That brings us to the Morgan 3 Wheeler. It's no good for a weekly shop, and a commute to the office in the middle of winter might not be the most enjoyable experience either, but it's a car that offers a driving experience unlike any other – it's a real enthusiast's machine.

More on the Morgan 3 Wheeler

In a new film, motoring journalist and presenter Alex Goy has shared his Morgan 3 Wheeler journey, from concept stage right to the present day where he drives, and enjoys it regularly.

"The 3 Wheeler is a bit of an odd one because, when you look at it on paper, there's no sensible reason for buying one," Goy says in the film. "A couple of years ago I drove the 3 Wheeler for work and I sort of fell in love with it.

"It was hilarious fun. The looks you get are amazing, the look of it is just wicked."

The 3 Wheeler can trace its roots right back to the very beginning of the Morgan Motor Company. The Malvern-based firm originally produced three-wheeled vehicles for a variety of applications, but as the world changed and the car became more a part of every day life, the car fell out of fashion, eventually being canned in the 1950s.

In 2011 Morgan, which continued to make sports cars that sympathetically infused modern technology and building techniques with old-school craftsmanship, re-launched the 3 wheeler is a quirky toy, much like the Caterham 7 and other lightweight hand-made sports cars which have undergone something of a resurgence in recent years.

"I love the fact that it exists now, because it itself played an important part in getting Britain motoring at the turn of the 20th century" Goy says.

"It went the way of the horse. In the '50s they stopped making them because they were more expensive to produce and people simply weren't buying them, Morgan had moved onto four-wheeled cars."

"Then in 2011 the new one came out and, much like the horse, it wasn't an essential any more ... it's not a tool, it's a thing for fun."

Goy's distinctive 3 wheeler was finished in a smart metallic purple, with World War 2 fighter-esque shark face decals – because of course. He enjoys the car regularly, too, and even drive it all the way from London to Portugal, and back, last year!