Alex Jones pleads for ‘prayers’ on Infowars as his texts set to be handed over to Jan 6 committee

·2-min read
Alex Jones pleads for ‘prayers’ on Infowars as his texts set to be handed over to Jan 6 committee

Alex Jones pleaded for the prayers of his Infowars audience as he lashed out at his “damn” lawyers for mistakenly handing over a copy of his cellphone data.

The right-wing conspiracy theorist was left stunned as the lawyers for a Sandy Hook family suing him for $150m revealed his own legal team had accidentally sent them the copy during trial earlier this week.

Now, it appears that the January 6 committee will be getting a copy of his text messages and emails as well.

Attorney for the plaintiffs, Mark Bankston, told the court in Texas that he has already been contacted by “several law enforcement agencies” to turn over the data and said he intends to do so.

When asked by a judge which agencies wanted the data, Mr Bankston confirmed the January 6 committee, which is investigating the pro-Trump riot.

“I need your hope, your prayers,” said Jones on his show the day after the court bombshell and as he waited for a jury to return its verdict.

He also said that the situation was “all part of my persecution” and that it was “a test” from God. He added, dramatically, that his “destruction will be spectacular.”

Jones went on to call the cellphone situation “incredibly sick” as he complained about what happened to him during his cross-examination on Thursday.

“It’s just so incredibly sick that I sit there and give the damn lawyers all the text messages... my lawyers give them the raw text messages of six months,” he said.

He insisted, falsely, that he had complied with discovery, which the judge ruled he had not.

Jones told the court that he did not have any Sandy Hook text messages on his phone and that he does not use email.

“I did search one of my phones and it didn’t have Sandy Hook stuff in it,” he insisted.”I just said, here, go search it and give it to the damn lawyers.”

Neil Heslin and Scarlett Lewis, whose six-year-old son Jesse was among the 20 students and six adults killed in the mass shooting, have sued Jones and his media company for the claims he has made that the massacre was a “false flag” operation and that the victims did not actually exist.

Now, Jones denies having an interest in Sandy Hook: “I don’t care about Sandy Hook. I don’t cover it unless they force us to.”

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