Allison Mack: Documentary about alleged sex cult involving Smallville star being produced

Jack Shepherd
Mack leaves US District Court after a bail hearing in Brooklyn yesterday: Getty Images

Thanks to the arrest of Smallsville actor Alison Mack, the organisation NXIVM has been making headlines all over the world.

Founded by Keith Raniere – who has also been arrested – the group offered people self-help but was allegedly a sex cult that kept women as “slaves”.

TV producers have since announced that a documentary series about NXIM will soon reach screens around the world.

According to Deadline, the series will follow former member Sarah Edmondson, who spoke out against NXIVM last year and alleged she was branded with Raniere’s initials.

The Canadian actor, along with husband Anthony Ames, have been working to help others allegedly trapped within NXIVM, the duo now joined by renowned cult expert and deprogrammer Rick Alan Ross.

No network has been announced as the producers – including Edmonson who will executive produce – are shopping the series around.

Meanwhile, Smallsville’s Mack reportedly attempted to recruit Emma Watson and Kelly Clarkson to the group. Best known for her role in comic book series, the 35-year-old has been charged with sex trafficking and conspiracy.

Prosecutors say Mack helped recruit “vulnerable” women to the group. They allege that upon joining, the women were forced to have sex with Raniere, branded with his initials and made to eat low-calorie diets to satisfy the leader’s alleged preference for thin women.

The prosecutors claim that the women were also made to give nude photographs, other personal information or rights to assets as collateral that could be used to threaten them with at a later date.

Sean Buckley, a lawyer for Mack, said a hearing: ”The allegations contained in the indictment are only that, allegations”.

Marc Agnifilo, a lawyer for Raniere, said earlier this month that he was “confident these allegations will be soundly disproven.”

NXVIM released a statement on its website which said: “In response to the allegations against our founder, Keith Raniere, we are currently working with the authorities to demonstrate his innocence and true character. We strongly believe the justice system will prevail in bringing the truth to light.“

It said it was “saddened” by reports, adding: “It is during the times of greatest adversity that integrity, humanity and compassion are hardest, and needed most.”

The group, which claims to be “working to build a better world” claims it is “a community guided by humanitarian principles that seek to empower people and answer important questions about what it means to be human”.

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