Ancient bluebell wood tucked away near Norwich to open for one weekend

Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park in Hainford is being opened to the public over the first May bank holiday weekend <i>(Image: Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park)</i>
Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park in Hainford is being opened to the public over the first May bank holiday weekend (Image: Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park)

An ancient bluebell wood will be open for public viewing over the upcoming bank holiday weekend.

Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park, in Hainford, is an 18-acre natural space filled with a diverse range of wildlife and plant species.

The five-acre sea of bluebells at its centre was originally part of the Stratton Strawless estate which was home to the renowned naturalist Robert Marsham in the 18th century.

Eastern Daily Press: The bluebell wood was originally part of the Stratton Strawless estate
Eastern Daily Press: The bluebell wood was originally part of the Stratton Strawless estate

The bluebell wood was originally part of the Stratton Strawless estate (Image: Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park)

It was mostly unnoticed for generations until it was purchased by Andrew and Caroline Morton 16 years ago.

The new owners added another 13 acres of land around the focal point of the wood to create a tranquil location for people to lay their loved ones to rest.

Eastern Daily Press: It has since been developed into a tranquil burial park
Eastern Daily Press: It has since been developed into a tranquil burial park

It has since been developed into a tranquil burial park (Image: Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park)

Mr Morton said: “In the early days local schoolchildren helped us plant 4,800 trees to form the Diamond Jubilee Wood.

"Now, the park is increasingly a magnet for all kinds of wildlife – songbirds, ducks, deer and foxes – while clouds of butterflies and insects are attracted to our wildflower meadows."

Eastern Daily Press: Caring for the site is a labour of love for owner Andrew Morton
Eastern Daily Press: Caring for the site is a labour of love for owner Andrew Morton

Caring for the site is a labour of love for owner Andrew Morton (Image: Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park)

From Saturday, May 4 until Monday, May 6, the owners will open the gates to the public for an open weekend so visitors can explore the carefully nurtured site themselves.

READ MORE: 7 of the best places in Norfolk to see bluebells in 2024

There is no set fee for entry but voluntary donations will be collected on behalf of Norfolk and Waveney Mind.

Last year's open weekend attracted 1,200 visitors.

Eastern Daily Press: There is no set fee for entry but charity donations are appreciated
Eastern Daily Press: There is no set fee for entry but charity donations are appreciated

There is no set fee for entry but charity donations are appreciated (Image: Norfolk Bluebell Wood Burial Park)

The park's 2024 guests will notice even more plants and wildlife as well as new solar panels covering Cedar Hall.

“Installation of the panels means we will have realised our dream of making the entire enterprise carbon neutral," Mr Morton added.

"I can’t stress how much that pleases us."

READ MORE: Norfolk Tulips fields near Sandringham shown from above

The park will be open between 10am and 4pm across the open weekend.

The mown grass and level woodland pathways are wheelchair accessible and a mobility buggy is available on site.

Dogs are welcome on leads.