Andy Cohen Opens Up About Coronavirus Symptoms and Reuniting with Son Benjamin After Quarantine

Dave Quinn
Andy Cohen Opens Up About Coronavirus Symptoms and Reuniting with Son Benjamin After Quarantine

Andy Cohen is on the other side of his battle with coronavirus (COVID-19).

On Monday’s episode of his SiriusXM show Andy Cohen Live, the Bravo host revealed that he’s feeling better and on the mend after testing positive for the virus back on March 20.

“It took 10 or 11 days to work through my system,” Cohen said. “You know, it takes a bit to get your energy back. There’s a thing where you feel mentally like, ‘Oh, I’m okay.’ And then you realize, you go downstairs and make a piece of toast and you come upstairs and you’re like, ‘Now I need to relax.’ ”

He went on to detail his symptoms, which included a fever, tightness in his chest, a cough, aches and pains in the body, exhaustion, and some chills, as well as a total loss of smell and appetite.

To treat it, Cohen said he turned to “a lot of Tylenol, a lot of Vitamin C and liquids.”

While getting better, Cohen said he was quarantined in his New York City apartment from his son Benjamin Allen, who turned 1 last month. The father-son duo were reuniting later on Monday, said Cohen, after doctors gave him the all-clear.

“Today is a huge day for me,” Cohen said. “I have been quarantined from Ben for the last 12 days or so and I’m going to get to see him right after the show.”

“Two doctors said it would be safe to see him yesterday and I freaked out on Saturday night, worried,” the Bravo star continued. “So I was like, ‘You know what, let me just add a day to that.’ ”

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Andy Cohen/Instagram Andy Cohen and his son Benjamin

RELATED: Andy Cohen Returning to Host WWHL from Home Over a Week After Testing Positive for Coronavirus

Earlier on Friday, it was announced that Cohen would be returning to host his late night show Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen this week for a series of new shows.

Shot from his house, WWHL @ Home (as the show has been dubbed) will have Cohen interviewing a string of celebrity guests via video chat. The action kicks off on Monday wit Real Housewives of Atlanta star Nene Leakes, Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star Lisa Rinna and Real Housewives superfan Jerry O’Connell.

Cohen was originally meant to bring WWHL back last week, but had to cancel after learning of his coronavirus diagnosis.

“After a few days of self-quarantine, and not feeling great, I have tested positive for coronavirus,” he wrote on Instagram on March 20. “As much as I felt like I could push through whatever I was feeling to do #WWHL from home, we’re putting a pin in that for now so I can focus on getting better.”

“I want to thank all the medical professionals who are working tirelessly for all of us, and urge everybody to stay home and take care of themselves,” Cohen continued.

Charles Sykes/Bravo/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images Andy Cohen

RELATED: Andy Cohen Says Being Separated from Son Benjamin Is ‘Very Worst Part’ of Coronavirus Quarantine

Since then, Cohen has kept fans updated on his health, calling into Jeff Lewis Live on March 24 to say that he was going through bouts of “horrible” symptoms while the virus was “working its way through my body.”

The hardest part for Cohen, he said, was being apart from Ben. “I’ll tell you what I know from the nanny cam and from video, because I can’t see him, which is the very worst part,” he said when asked about his 13-month-old. “But he’s great and his nanny [tested] negative.”

As of Monday morning, at least 141,995 people have been diagnosed with coronavirus in the United States, according to a New York Times database. More than 2,400 have died.

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE ON THE FRONT LINES OF COVID-19!” Cohen wrote on Instagram Monday morning.

As information about the coronavirus pandemic rapidly changes, PEOPLE is committed to providing the most recent data in our coverage. Some of the information in this story may have changed after publication. For the latest on COVID-19, readers are encouraged to use online resources from CDC, WHO, and local public health departments and visit our coronavirus hub.