Astonishing moment street cleaner cheats death by inches when block of ice 'falls from plane' in Kew

Barney Davis

This is the incredible moment a block of ice falling from the sky narrowly misses a street cleaner in leafy Kew Gardens.

CCTV footage captured the moment council worker Serhiy Myeshkov is startled by the loud “explosion” of sound as the 20kg sheet of ice crashed to the ground “like a meteorite”.

He was working under a busy flight path to Heathrow in North Road, yards from Kew Gardens station, leading to speculation from onlookers that it fell from a plane.

Amir Khan, 39, of taxi firm International Chauffeurs, captured the moment on the taxi firm’s security camera at just after 9am on Wednesday.

The large chunk of ice smashes to the ground in front of the shocked street cleaner

He said: “It was like the start of a disaster movie like The Day After Tomorrow.

“It made such a loud noise like a meteorite crashing down. The street cleaner was so confused and scared. Everyone came running out to look at the sky. It was crazy.”

The chunk of ice, roughly the size of a football, narrowly missed hitting pedestrians beneath

His boss Mos Sayid added: “I walk my kids round that corner all the time it has me worried for them. I live close by so I’m constantly under the flight path - there is no escape.

"It’s a miracle no one was hit. It was a really big block of ice - bigger than your head. I hope something changes so it doesn’t happen again.”

Vipin Chopra, 50, was inside the off-licence when he heard what sounded like a “huge explosion” from outside.

He said: “The airline is at fault, its under a flightpath. I keep looking up thinking it could happen again.

Near miss: The shattered ice on the tarmac in Kew (@huldatheprophet)

“It’s such a popular area school kids always walk along there. “Anything falling from that height could have killed.

“The airlines need to do something to ensure it doesn’t happen again.”

In comparison to the 2.5 million flights a year in UK airspace, approximately 30 ice falls per year are reported to the UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).

They say they can be caused by leaks from planes or when ice which has naturally formed on an aircraft at higher altitudes breaks off as it descends into warmer air.

A spokesman for CAA said: “Although ice does very occasionally fall from aircraft, it can also be the result of meteorological phenomena.

“We receive around 30 reported ice falls every year, although we are not certain how many of these incidents are the result of ice falling from an aircraft.”

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