Bank of England’s top economist Andy Haldane to step down and take new job

Joanna Bourke
·1-min read
<p>Andy Haldane, chief economist and member of the Monetary Policy Committee, is leaving the Bank of England</p> (Matt Writtle)

Andy Haldane, chief economist and member of the Monetary Policy Committee, is leaving the Bank of England

(Matt Writtle)

Andy Haldane, chief economist of the Bank of England, is leaving the Bank later this year to lead the royal society for arts, manufactures and commerce (RSA).

Haldane has worked at the Bank for over thirty years and is also a member of the Bank’s Monetary Policy Committee (MPC).

He will step down from the MPC after its June meeting and take up the role of RSA chief executive in September.

The RSA is a charity, founded in 1754, which is focused on social change in different industries and government.

Andrew Bailey, Governor, said: “Andy has been an exemplary public servant over his more than three decades at the Bank, making major contributions to the Bank’s work in financial stability and monetary policymaking.”

Bailey added: “He has also been an imaginative and creative thinker on the wide range of issues the UK economy faces, as well as helping create and drive forward new ways for the Bank to engage with the public.”

Haldane, who last month said he wanted Londoners who had built up savings during the Covid lockdowns to spend them to help power the economic recovery, called the Bank a “fantastic institution”.

Regarding his new job, Haldane said: “I am thrilled to have the opportunity to lead another great British institution, the RSA. For 250 years, it too has served society with distinction, combining the very best of public service, commercial innovation and civic participation. I am delighted to be helping write the next chapter in the RSA’s illustrious history.”

The Bank will advertise for a successor to Haldane in due course.

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