'Battle of the Brits' confirmed with Andy Murray to compete in six-day event to raise funds for NHS charities

MATT MAJENDIE
Getty Images

A tennis battle of the Brits will take place in London next month between the country's leading players, including Andy Murray.

The six-day event, which begins on June 23 and was officially announced on Friday morning, is the brainchild of Jamie Murray and will be contested behind closed doors at the National Tennis Centre in Roehampton.

It will see the likes of the Murray brothers, British no1 Dan Evans and Kyle Edmund battle it out to be crowned singles and doubles champions.

The competition is to be screened on Amazon Prime in the UK and Ireland, as well as Eurosport and the Tennis Channel in the US. The event, named Schroders Battle of the Brits, also aims to raise at least £100,0000 for NHS Charities Together.

Jamie Murray said: “The last few months have been incredibly challenging times for everyone, and we see this event as our way of giving back.

"A lot of work has gone in to make sure this could happen and we are very excited to be able to bring an action-packed week of tennis while raising valuable funds for NHS heroes to say thank you for the amazing work they have done.

“I’m really excited to be putting on Schroders Battle of the Brits and for the first time bringing together the current generation of British male players to compete against one another while raising significant funds for charity.”

Battle of the brothers: Andy and Jamie Murray will both compete at the six-day event in Roehampton next month (Getty Images)

Following the event’s launch, LTA chief executive Scott Lloyd said: “The LTA is looking forward to bringing tennis back into people’s lives this summer and are excited about events like this inspiring fans to get involved in our sport and pick up a racket.”

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