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The Best Looks From New York Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2024

luar rtw fall 2024 ambiance
The Best Looks From New York Fashion Week FW24Nina Westervelt - Getty Images

Alejandra Alonso Rojas

Guests were welcomed into Casa Cipriani with the sound of chirping birds for Alejandra Alonso Rojas’ latest collection. Known for her fine-tuned tailoring and knits, this season brought her signature style to the forest, with camouflage and leafy prints. The Madrid-born designer proved she knows what cool girl fall looks like, and that even as the seasons change, it’s always time to embrace the outdoors. (And health, too: All attendees were gifted a bag of by dria wellness essentials, including under-eye patches, face oil, and magnesium for sleep, curated by Dria Murphy.)—Samuel Maude, associate editor

alejandra alonso rojas
Courtesy of Alejandra Alonso Rojas

Alejandra Alonso Rojas

alejandra alonso rojas
Courtesy of Alejandra Alonso Rojas

Alejandra Alonso Rojas

alejandra alonso rojas
Courtesy of Alejandra Alonso Rojas

Luar

What started out as rumblings and rumors came true last night: Beyoncé herself descended upon a Bushwick warehouse for the Luar show. Her, along with Tina and Solange Knowles, were there to support Julez Smith, Solange’s son, who made his runway debut. And what a show to debut at: creative director Raul Lopez examined the metrosexual this season, and how men show up in the world who also happen to care about fashion. This meant exaggerated, spliced and diced Coogi sweaters-cum-dresses, leather and wool suiting that was exaggeratedly large (turtle shoulders are a brand signature) or super-small, plus the introducing of Luar Basics and a collaboration with Moose Knuckles Canada. Don’t worry, there was plenty for the girls too: feathered boot-leggings, ostrich-skin ballgown skirts, and oxblood gowns with napkin-ring accents. If you’re overwhelmed with goodness, you know it was the show of the season. The Knowles family stamp of approval was just an extra cherry on top of the visual buffet. —Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

luar, fall 2024, new york city, february 13, 2024
Jonas Gustavsson

Luar

luar, fall 2024, new york city, february 13, 2024
Jonas Gustavsson

Luar

luar, fall 2024, new york city, february 13, 2024
Jonas Gustavsson

Batsheva

When one goes to a Batsheva show, they can expect a full production. The show, which began with an interpretive dance, was graced with live, orchestral music and had Ella Emhoff and Zac Posen in the front row. Batsheva Hay made a clear statement, too: Batsheva is unapologetically Jewish and made for women of every age. Hay toyed with the concept of modesty, presenting transparent, exposed looks while also showing fully covered garments on models who were all over 40. Many walked the runway for the first time with tears in their eyes. Guests were treated to emotional vulnerability, and a vibrant excitement radiated throughout the room, bringing life to this late night show.—Samuel Maude, associate editor

batsheva
Courtesy of Batsheva

Batsheva

batsheva
Courtesy of Batsheva

Batsheva

batsheva
Courtesy of Batsheva

Wiederhoeft

Jackson Wiederhoeft flexed his technical prowess in a stunning show on Tuesday, with his typical ragtag bunch of wild creatures emerging through a smoke-filled room in his signature corsetry (the best in New York), this time updated in tweed and embellished with hand-sewn glass cut beads. Elsewhere, highlights included a pink “bow-bondage” look, dotted with crystals and tied up (literally) with horizontal bows. It was the best thing we’ve seen all week, both from a technical and aesthetic viewpoint. Read Sabrina Brier’s front row review here. —Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a person wearing a long dress
Courtesy of Wiederhoeft

Wiederhoeft

a person in a dress
Courtesy of Wiederhoeft

Wiederhoeft

a person wearing a dress
Courtesy of Wiederhoeft

LaQuan Smith

There’s workwear, and then there’s LaQuan Smith’s workwear, according to the designer’s latest collection. Inspired by the “unapologetic strength and glamour of female power brokers,” there are sultry, hot suiting and fluffy fur coats and jackets. Complete with rich hues of navy, caramel, brown, and red, LaQuan Smith is providing a new definition for the day-to-night look.—Dale Arden Chong, senior fashion commerce editor

laquan smith fall winter 2024
Don Ashby/FirstVIEW

LaQuan Smith

laquan smith fall winter 2024
Don Ashby/FirstVIEW

LaQuan Smith

laquan smith fall winter 2024
Don Ashby/FirstVIEW

Sergio Hudson

Sergio Hudson threw it back to the 70s. For this collection, Hudson built upon last season and continued to find inspiration through the likes of Bianca Jagger, Diahann Carroll, and Cher, making garments for “women that put on clothes that make statements.” The collection featured a Crayola box of color, including red velvet, shimmering gold, and transparent yellow, however the most successful looks came from more layered and muted palette. The denim, plaids, and brown leather felt more relaxed and forward thinking for this upcoming fall.—Samuel Maude, associate editor

sergio hudson
Courtesy of Sergio Hudson

Sergio Hudson

sergio hudson
Courtesy of Sergio Hudson

Sergio Hudson

sergio hudson
Courtesy of Sergio Hudson

Puppets and Puppets

In what was to be Puppets and Puppets' last showing at NYFW, creative director Carly Mark found sophistication. With a color palette of mostly black, white, rust and caramel, the collection was perhaps one of the more elevated showings for the brand. Furs and florals were met with distressed hoodies and unexpected draping. There was an emphasis on tights, particularly in the way Mark seamed them to be excessive in some looks, stirruped in others. There were none of the brand’s infamous cookie bags, not even a single banana handle. Instead, square croc-embossed totes, distorted shoulder bags, and curve-handled mini bags accessorized the runway. The collection as a whole felt more grown-up, albeit a bit somber given the news that the cult-favorite brand will no longer make clothes or put on runway shows, and that Mark in fact is leaving the city completely to focus on the more lucrative handbag-side of the business in London. Maybe it’s just a sign of the times or maybe, it’s a reminder that eventually, we all have to get serious.—Madison Rexroat, fashion & accessories assistant

puppets and puppets, fall 2024, new york city, february 12 2024
Don Ashby

Puppets and Puppets

puppets and puppets, fall 2024, new york city, february 12 2024
Don Ashby

Puppets and Puppets

puppets and puppets, fall 2024, new york city, february 12 2024
Don Ashby

Retrofête

On Monday evening, influencers and industry heavyweights alike gathered at the Plaza for Retrofête’s boss-bitch inspired show. Caroline Trentini opened in a three piece skirt suit that demanded attention with its massive shoulders. The parade of looks that followed were a study in mobwifery and 80s power dressing, with opulent furs, leather skirts, and downright hot black party dresses, sure to wow on any occasion. —Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a woman in a dress
Courtesy of Retrofete

Retrofête

a person in a garment
Courtesy of Retrofete

Retrofête

a person wearing a purple garment
Courtesy of Retrofete

Markarian

Sitting at the Markarian fall/winter 2024 presentation, I felt like I was experiencing a private salon appointment with the designer—which was only in part due to the intimate setting of the Markarian showroom. Drawing inspiration from the immaculate and sacred hearts seen in Venetian churches, Alexandra O’Neill creates a collection that feels reminiscent of Old Hollywood’s red carpet glamour—with standouts including a silk chiffon dress and the drop-waist gown. For the daytime, there were coordinated sets featuring prints inspired by church interiors.—Dale Arden Chong, senior fashion commerce editor

markarian fall winter 2024
Courtesy of Markarian

Markarian

markarian fall winter 2024
Courtesy of Markarian

Markarian

markarian fall winter 2024
Courtesy of Markarian

Diotima

Rachel Leigh Scott of Diotima is fresh off a runner-up win from the CVFF/Vogue Fashion Fund, and expanded her worldview with a refreshing collection of bold, directional macrame dresses in deep mustards and invigorating pinks, balanced by delicate crochet pieces—a cornerstone of the brand— and suiting in dark burgundy and navy. Her commitment to building a wardrobe for both day and evening shows she’s doubling down and ready for the business to grow. —Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a woman taking a selfie
Courtesy of Diotima

Diotima

a person in a dress
Courtesy of Diotima

Diotima

a person wearing a red coat
Courtesy of Diotima

Coach

Coach's fall collection was an ode to New York, both its past and present, with a highlight reel of downtown and uptown must-have pieces, from taffeta bowed skirts, to cardigan jackets, to leather and suede fringed coats. The real stars were the accessories, with a new bag debuting, and styling with NYC tourist tchotchkes driving home the celebration of fashion's rebel child city. Read my full review here. —Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a person wearing a coat and gloves
Isidore Montag / Courtesy of COACH

Coach

a man wearing a jacket
Photo: Isidore Montag / Gorunway.com

Coach

a woman in a dress
Photo: Isidore Montag / Gorunway.com

Zankov

Henry Zankov’s latest presentation was named “Hold Me Closer,” with the idea of a collection so cozy, it’s a warm embrace amidst the chaos of living in a city. Zankov’s sensibility has always leaned Euro-chic, with unexpected muted colors playing together like a mustard-yellow knit paired with purple or shocking orange, or the Milanese color combo of mint green and Burgundy. This season saw him expand on what knitwear looks like today, with perforated knits embracing the body and swishing knit pants shying away and adding space. The styling, plus jewelry made by Presley Oldham, gave the collection an old world feeling that was entirely contemporary, and entirely singular, a rarity in the New York fashion landscape.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a person in a black and white dress
Jimi Franklin, Courtesy of ZANKOV

Zankov

a mannequin wearing a red and blue and white striped coat
Jimi Franklin, Courtesy of ZANKOV

Zankov

a mannequin wearing a sweater
Jimi Franklin, Courtesy of ZANKOV

Kallmeyer

Daniella Kallmeyer is on a roll with her namesake label, creating an energetic label for the downtown working set that matches quality with daily doses of chic. Her starting point this season was vintage ski style pics, inspiring the knits seen throughout, and giving way to the layering that is bound to trend for Fall. Standout pieces include an A-line shift dress in leather buttoned up the front, and a draped dress in a red surely inspired by bold skiwear. —Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a person in a suit
Courtesy of Kallmeyer

Kallmeyer

a person wearing an orange dress
Courtesy of Kallmeyer

Kallmeyer

a person wearing sunglasses
Courtesy of Kallmeyer

Ludovic de Saint Sernin

The fall/winter 2024 season marked Ludovic de Saint Sernin’s first showing outside of Paris, a result of a partnership between the brand and The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Contrasting the soft and subversive, the collection paid homage to the iconic photographer’s ‘80s-era dominance, with transparent flower motifs mixed with BDSM-esque leather. LdSS is the perfect brand to execute such a juxtaposition, and with a New York City backdrop to bolster its leather-culture cred, the collection was a tough, yet beautiful interpretation of Mapplethorpe’s perspective.—Madison Rexroat, fashion & accessories assistant

a person walking down a runway
INDIGITAL.TV

Ludovic de Saint Sernin

a woman in a red dress
INDIGITAL.TV

Ludovic de Saint Sernin

a woman walking on a runway
INDIGITAL.TV

Area

All eyes were on Piotrek Pansczcyk’s Area this season. The viral brand started their show just as Taylor Swift descended upon the Super Bowl in their embellished black jeans, proving Area’s impact extends far beyond their outlandishly and sometimes overly whimsical couture. For this season’s ready-to-wear and couture collection, Pansczcyk became transfixed on the concept of viewership. Using 60s pop-art, 1920s cartoon eyes, flowers, spots, and more, every look had a slight optical allusion. On some, only the model’s face or eyes could be seen, while others were more literal (yes, we're still thinking about that viral googly-eyed dress). In his show notes, Pansczcyk said the collection is “a play between viewing and being viewed,” however one thing is clear: it was quite hard to look away. —Samuel Maude, associate editor

area
Courtesy of Area

Area

area
Courtesy of Area

Area

area
Courtesy of Area

Sandy Liang

Sandy Liang celebrated 10 years of her eponymous label with her latest collection, which shows her coquettish schoolgirl growing up. That said, while she may be maturing, she hasn’t lost touch with her inner child. Liang draws inspiration from Sailor Moon and shopping catalogs of the early aughts to create pieces that are timeless with a touch of nostalgia. Girlhood is still front and center in this latest collection, with items including star-shaped earrings and handbags, as well as fluffy skirts and jackets, but it also takes a more streamlined approach in the form of classic sweaters and tailoring. And to round it out, the show was complete with a soundtrack featuring Madonna, Janet Jackson, and Peaches—music that would make any early-aughts rom-com lover swoon.—Dale Arden Chong, senior fashion commerce editor

sandy liang fall winter 2024
Launchmetrics Spotlight

Sandy Liang

sandy liang fall winter 2024
Launchmetrics Spotlight

Sandy Liang

sandy liang fall winter 2024
Launchmetrics Spotlight

PatBO

This season, Patricia Bonaldi’s show was for the ladies. Themed around the multi-faceted nature of modern women, the sultry two-piece sets and semi-sheer mini dresses served as an ode to elegant sensuality. Embellishments and cut-outs were aplenty throughout the mostly black collection, bookended emerald green and white ensembles (the latter pictured here). Bonaldi drew inspiration from old-school glamour, although any of the looks would fit right in on a 2024 red carpet. Further adding to the mood were dancers (30 of them, to be exact)—all aspiring professionals from New York’s Joffrey Ballet School showcasing ballet, jazz, and contemporary disciplines.—Meg Donohue, associate fashion commerce editor

a person wearing a dress
Darian DiCianno

PatBO

a model in dress
Darian DiCianno

PatBO

a woman wearing a dress
Darian DiCianno

Fforme

a man wearing a long coat and sunglasses
Monica Feudi

Fforme

Fforme continues to expand its notion of femininity through exploration of fabrics and engineering, bringing together unlikely fabrics in unlikely ways. Casual pants in leather and a striking emerald jersey were darted along the waist, cinching and giving form without stricture. Styling with leather flats and knit swim caps, plus custom sunnies from Port Tanger, lended to an urban, sophisticated vibe. The general mood was one of ease and grace, and aspiration, as my co-worker said leaving the show: “This is who I want to grow up to be.”—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a person wearing a white suit
Monica Feudi

Fforme

a model wearing a white shirt and green pants
Monica Feudi

Khaite

Khaite is for the cool girls, and this season was certainly no different. For her latest collection since being named Womenswear Designer of the Year at the CFDAs for the second consecutive year, Catherine Holstein took inspiration from the unfolding of fabrics (as seen here, accessorized with transparent opera gloves) and turned her focus to material. Feminine shapes fused with menswear-inspired tailoring and there was even a (very) subtle nod to the mob wife trend: colorful shearling jackets were paired with gold chains, black sunglasses, and a powerful strut. Read my full review here.—Claire Stern, digital director

khaite fall winter 2024 collection
Hanna Tveite

Khaite

khaite fall winter 2024 collection
Hanna Tveite

Khaite

khaite fall winter 2024 collection
Hanna Tveite

Eckhaus Latta

Eckhaus Latta has always been a little sleazy—but you already knew that. The duo behind the cult NYC brand staged a hot love letter to the city and the style they’ve help defined: irregular knits, shearling coats, and lacquered padded pants all paired cozily with slick sunglasses, transparent button-downs, gauzy tanks, and killer platform shoes in mohair and brushed maroon leather, the must-have item of the show. In other words, a refinement of the cool-girl uniform, the Eckhaus way. To top it all off, a live performer sang Lana Del Rey and Lou Reed, plus Alek Wek closed.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a person wearing a white dress
Madison Voelkel

Eckhaus Latta

eckhaus latta fw24
Madison Voelkel

Eckhaus Latta

a woman wearing a yellow jacket and red boots
Madison Voelkel

Proenza Schouler

With pared-back wardrobe staples, a muted color palette (save for pops of red, peach, and gold), Proenza Schouler creative directors Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez are putting their own spin on quiet luxury. The result? A collection destined for the closets of the elevated women they’re designing for, complete with expertly tailored coats, leather accessories, and fluffy fur paired with practical footwear that’ll undoubtedly serve as the foundation for the New York woman’s everyday wardrobe. Read my full review here.—Dale Arden Chong, senior fashion commerce editor

proenza schouler fall 2024
Courtesy of Proenza Schouler

Proenza Schouler

proenza schouler fall 2024
Courtesy of Proenza Schouler

Proenza Schouler

proenza schouler fall 2024
Courtesy of Proenza Schouler

Tommy Hilfiger

Tommy Hilfiger brought the party to New York Fashion Week (and won the award for best venue so far) by taking over the Grand Central Oyster Bar with his signature prep classics, reimagined with new details and layering techniques. The highlight of the show was definitely the soundtrack by Questlove and a surprise performance by Jon Batiste, who livened up the crowd with an upbeat performance of his song “Freedom.” Oh, and the French fries and martinis, a.k.a. the New York happy meal.—Claire Stern, digital director

tommy hilfiger fall winter 2024
Courtesy of Tommy Hilfiger

Tommy Hilfiger

tommy hilfiger fall winter 2024
Courtesy of Tommy Hilfiger

Tommy Hilfiger

tommy hilfiger fall winter 2024
Courtesy of Tommy Hilfiger

Willy Chavarria

Willy Chavarria is taking American sportswear and ’80s power dressing and flipping it on its head, making it cool again. His clothing is not only instantly desirable and impeccably made, but provides him with a platform to connect across races, generations, and body types in a way few designers have in New York in a long, long time. Plus, he made his directorial debut with a powerful, sexy-as-hell short film before the runway show. Read my full review here.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

SELWYN TUNGOL
SELWYN TUNGOL

Willy Chavarria

SELWYN TUNGOL

3.1 Phillip Lim

A New York brand to the core, 3.1 Phillip Lim knows that New Yorkers are too busy running from show to show, so instead, he chose to present his FW24 collection with an art installation right by Chinatown, where guests could swing by at their leisure and enjoy a cocktail or two while they do. The assortment riffed on classic staples by adding a touch of irreverence, from abstract prints to capri-length leggings and a jewel-tone teddy jacket that’ll make going on an coffee run the chicest thing you do all day.—Claire Stern, digital director

phillip lim presents fw24 collection
Charlotte Swinburn

3.1 Phillip Lim

phillip lim presents fw24 collection
Charlotte Swinburn

3.1 Phillip Lim

phillip lim presents fw24 collection
Charlotte Swinburn

Collina Strada

It’s bulking season at Collina Strada. Hillary Taymour took machismo and made it Collina-approved, with musculature pushing through molded latex tops and ruched silk dresses. Models walked with squash dumbbells, coated in sweat and making their best weightlifting faces. In between all the macho, there was plenty of great draped dresses in plaids and her signature muddled prints, plus corsetry and easy sweatsuits for when you’re actually hitting the gym.—Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

a model wearing a white suit
Photo: Daniele Oberrauch / Gorunway.com

Collina Strada

a person wearing a dress
Photo: Daniele Oberrauch / Gorunway.com

Collina Strada

a person wearing a pink coat and pants with a red and white shirt
Photo: Daniele Oberrauch / Gorunway.com

Helmut Lang

For his second runway at Helmut Lang, Peter Do stayed true to the brand’s ethos of outfitting New Yorkers in clothes they want to wear by developing a uniform of sorts, comprised of ultra-cozy coats, mismatched plaid separates, and balaclava hoodies fit for the gnarliest winter days. Titled “Protection vs. Projection,” the collection married form and function, versatility and ease.—Claire Stern, digital director

helmut lang fw24
Courtesy of Helmut Lang

Helmut Lang

helmut lang fw24
Courtesy of Helmut Lang

Helmut Lang

helmut lang fw24
Courtesy of Helmut Lang

Christian Siriano

You can always count on Christian Siriano to put on a show—albeit late and very long. Still, the designer consistently proves he’s worthy of a place on the New York Fashion Week schedule by turning out look after look (61 in total for fall/winter 2024) in front of an always-eclectic front row. This go-around, Sophia Bush, Busy Philipps, Melanie Lynskey, Alicia Silverstone, J. Smith-Cameron, and Ashley Simpson all descended on The Plaza to take in the designer’s latest, inspired by Dune (the book and the movies). “The collection embodies the idea of what eveningwear and glamour would look like in a sci-fi, apocalyptic desert—which informs a rich color palette and luminous textures like luxurious creams, liquid metallics, burnt orange lamés with intricate glass beading, deep reds, and black shimmering tinsel reminiscent of a vast starry sky,” Siriano writes in the show notes. Zendaya, are you listening?—Claire Stern, digital director

new york, new york february 08 a model walks the runway during the christian siriano fallwinter 2024 fashion show at the plaza hotel on february 08, 2024 in new york city photo by jp yimgetty images for christian siriano
Janice Yim - Getty Images

Christian Siriano

christian siriano fall winter 2024 runway show at the plaza
Janice Yim - Getty Images

Christian Siriano

christian siriano fall winter 2024 runway show at the plaza
Janice Yim - Getty Images

Dwarmis

Designer Dwarmis Concepción worked with an entirely Latinx team to create the lookbook featuring her latest collection. She drew inspiration from her childhood home’s artwork, tiles and colors in the Dominican Republic to create a lush collection of deep tans, crisp whites and stark blacks on silks, twills, and cottons that are chic without sacrificing utility. We’re particularly obsessed with the cream boucle jacket that is narrow at the waist for a decidedly feminine edge. —Kevin LeBlanc, fashion associate

dwarmis fall 2024
Courtesy of Designer

Dwarmis

dwarmis
Courtesy of Designer

Dwarmis

dwarmis fall 2024
Courtesy of Designer

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