BMW commits to carbon-free shipping by 2030

Ethan Jupp
BMW zero-emission shipping

BMW will expand its commitment to reducing emissions by focusing on transport and logistics. The company has joined the ‘Getting to Zero Coalition’, with the aim of using only zero-emissions cargo ships by 2030. 

BMW joins Volkswagen in its recent targeting of shipping to cut carbon. Overall, it plans to reduce emissions by using carbon-free fuels, along with efficient propulsion systems.

It would make a big difference, too. Maritime transport accounts for around three percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. It also makes up 50 percent of BMW’s transport chain emissions.

BMW zero-emission shipping

“Maritime transport is crucial for supplying the BMW Group’s international manufacturing network and for the global distribution of vehicles,” said Jürgen Maidl, senior vice president for supply chain management at BMW.

“We see the Getting to Zero Coalition of various governments, companies and other cross-sector stakeholders as a unique opportunity to continuously minimise carbon emissions in the maritime sector as well.

“We are delighted to be the first carmaker to join this coalition and thus lead the way towards more sustainability.”

BMW zero-emission shipping

All factories operated by BMW and three joint-venture plants will be exclusively powered by renewable energy sources from next year. European plants have been 100 percent green since last year.

Then, of course, there is BMW’s product portfolio. On top of producing ever-cleaner combustion engines, the brand is aggressively expanding its electric vehicle line-up. Currently, it offers 12 models that are electrified, with the i8 and i3 being the poster children for this tech. Soon, the iNext and i4 will join them.

What an ironic picture it is, then, to see low-emissions BMW vehicles rolling onto a smoggy super-ship. Given its 2030 pledge, that’s an irony that hasn’t escaped the company.

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