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Bride-to-be asked to tip while buying her wedding dress purchase: ‘This is getting out of hand’

A TikToker slammed a bridal store when it asked for a gratuity on a wedding dress.
A TikToker slammed a bridal store when it asked for a gratuity on a wedding dress.

Wedding bells weren’t ringing yet, but the cash register certainly was.

The sister of a bride-to-be blasted a dress shop that insisted she tip an absurdly high amount while leaving a deposit for her wedding dress.

“The options were 20%, 25% 30% or other,” TikToker Avery Brynn ranted on the platform.

“They had the audacity — there wasn’t even a 0 [percent] option,” she added.

Brynn conceded the tablet-based register did have the option to leave no tip, but it was buried beneath several screens.

She griped that the tactic made it obvious and embarrassing that a customer wasn’t adding any gratuity.

“Whatever the budget of your dress is now you have to tip 20% on top of that? This is getting out of hand.”

The Knot reported that the average wedding dress in 2022 cost added a $1,900 bill to a bride’s nuptials whereas designer ones can run up to $10,000.

With an added 20% gratuity, saying yes to the standard dress would be $2,280.

Bridal stores are now asking for tips on pricey wedding dresses. Getty Images/iStockphoto
Bridal stores are now asking for tips on pricey wedding dresses. Getty Images/iStockphoto

As recent data shows much of the country is reeling with “guilt tipping” fatigue, the commenters on Brynn’s video — viewed almost 50,000 times — were no different.

“This happened to me last year when we purchased my daughter’s prom dress that we were already paying $500 for,” one user wrote. “It’s getting ridiculous.”

“I’m so sick of tipping culture in the [U.S.],” added another.

A major part of the frustration for those who have tipped past the point of excess tipping on every service imaginable is that doing so is conceptually flawed.

Tipping began as a cultural norm in American dine-in restaurants because servers typically opt for a salary below minimum wage in order to be eligible for a tip credit — something new legislation is looking to end.

Many sparked ire at the guilty tipping ploy. Getty Images
Many sparked ire at the guilty tipping ploy. Getty Images

That is why it hasn’t been traditionally applied to other full-salaried industries where workers make above-bar.

However, pairing tablet technology with the exploitation of guilty or sympathetic consciences has aggressively shifted the tipping culture in recent years. New research by USA Today finds 40% of Americans left a tip out of guilt and 63% complained about how many places insist on a gratuity now.

At the end of December, another TikToker, Ina Josipovic slammed a bridal store that prompted her for a ten percent tip as well.