Bristol 'Kill the Bill' rioters sentenced - as woman who urinated next to police walks free from court

A woman who urinated next to police and lashed out at officers during the "Kill the Bill" riot in Bristol has walked free from court.

Fleur Moody, 26, was sentenced to an eight-month prison term, suspended for 18 months, after admitting affray.

Moody, of Montpelier, Bristol, was also handed 80 hours of community service and must complete a rehabilitation order after getting involved in the unrest which engulfed central Bristol on 21 March last year.

The Kill the Bill protest against the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts bill, proposing to give extended power to police to shut down demonstrations, was initially peaceful.

But violence broke out leaving 44 officers injured and causing at least £212,000 worth of damage to police property.

Two co-defendants were both given 21-month prison sentences after admitting a charge of violent disorder during the sentencing hearing at Bristol Crown Court on Friday.

Christopher Hind, 38, of Eastville, Bristol, was caught on CCTV displaying aggressive behaviour, including pushing and kicking out at police, over a two-hour period.

Tyler Overall, 28, of Filton, South Gloucestershire, was seen to goad and attack officers, grabbing at their shields.

So far, 23 people have been jailed for offences committed during the riot for a combined total of 81 years and three months, Avon and Somerset Police said.

A "shameful night" of violence

Supt James Riccio said: "Three more people have been brought to justice for their actions on that shameful night.

"They all displayed criminal behaviour and admitted offences due to the significant amount of material, particularly moving footage, which has been gathered, reviewed and assessed, during the course of this ongoing investigation."

Some 500 people are said to have descended on Bridewell police station during the riot, setting vehicles ablaze and smashing the windows.

Former Avon and Somerset Police chief superintendent Carolyn Belafonte described the riot as "nothing short of reprehensible".