Bristol moving into Tier 3 ‘shattering news’ for hospitality sector, says mayor

Claire Hayhurst, PA
·2-min read

Moving Bristol back into Tier 3 restrictions will be “shattering news” for the city’s hospitality industry, the mayor has said.

Bristol was placed into Tier 3 on December 2, with this later reduced to Tier 2 measures that came into force on December 19.

However, Health Secretary Matt Hancock announced on Wednesday that the city is going back into Tier 3 restrictions from Boxing Day.

Figures show that the number of people contracting Covid-19 in Bristol has risen sharply, with the city’s infection rate currently at 156 cases per 100,000 people.

Over the past seven days, there were 721 positive results in the city.

Marvin Rees, the mayor of Bristol, acknowledged that people would be “disappointed” to move back into Tier 3.

“In the past few weeks, many of us have continued to make sacrifices to drive down the Covid-19 infection rates,” Mr Rees said.

“Our efforts were acknowledged by the Government which saw the city move down to the Tier 2 – high alert – level of restrictions.

“I know people will be disappointed we have moved back into Tier 3, but infection rates are increasing in Bristol and we must continue to protect each other.”

The Tier 3 restrictions will come into force across Bristol from 00.01 on Boxing Day.

All essential and non-essential shops are able to open but there are restrictions on socialising and the hospitality sector.

These include the closure of hospitality settings such as bars, pubs, cafes and restaurants apart from takeaway, click-and-collect, drive-through or delivery services.

Mr Rees said: “I know moving back into Tier 3 will be shattering news for those in the hospitality sector who desperately needed the boost during the festive season, but unfortunately our rising infection rates mean difficult decisions must be taken to protect Bristol.

“We urge Government to consider the economic consequences as part of the decision-making process around tiering decisions, and to recognise the total number of businesses within cities like Bristol, something not currently reflected in the Government formula that determines the amount of funding each city gets to support its people.”