Britain's Got Talent fans compare 'amazing' act to previous contestant

Britain's Got Talent judge Bruno Tonioli hailed the performance as 'powerful'
-Credit: (Image: ITV)


Britains Got Talent fans have compared an act on tonight's show to a previous winner.

Dancer Leightonjay Halliday put on an incredible performance for judges Simon Cowell, Alesha Dixon, Bruno Tonioli and Amanda Holden. His "passionate" dance to Kodi Lee's 'Changes' snapped him up a standing ovation, bringing him to tears.

The 23-year-old dancer from Scotland said that his main goal for coming on the show was to "inspire young dancers to never give up". After a dramatic performance branded "powerful" by Bruno Tonioli, the audience were left cheering and clapping.

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Some fans were very quick to compare Leightonjay's performance to a previous Britains Got Talent winner back in 2008. George Samspon won the second series of Britains Got Talent back in 2008 with his rendition of 'Singing In The Rain' by Mint Royale.

Complete with an artificial rain machine on-stage, George Sampson won the competiton at just 14-years-old. Britain's Got Talent fans were quick to make the comparison between the two talented dancers, sharing their thoughts to X, previously known as Twitter.

One fan said: "The boy dancing in water reminded me of George Sampson dancing in water #BGT."

A second tweet read: "Leighton Jay: I love this style of dance. The only negative I have is that George Sampson has done this before. I hope he changes things up if he gets to the Semi finals. Love this kind of act though so I hope he does well. #BGT."

A third fan said: "This is giving George Sampson vibes! #bgt #britainsgottalent."

A fourth tweet read: "This guy is like George Sampson for the 2020s. #BritainsGotTalent."

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