Bugatti Veyron with rear panel delete stands out on public roads

feedback@motor1.com (Chris Okula)
Bugatti Veyron With Rear Panel Delete Stands Out On Public Roads

How to properly show off your Bugatti's engine.

If you like driving under the radar, then the Bugatti Veyron is simply not the car for you. I understand there are many potential customers out there looking toward the Veyron for their next used car purchase, but only attention seekers should apply. For Veyron owners out there who feel the Veyron doesn’t get them enough attention, the team over at Royalty Exotics has the solution for you. 

To gain as much attention as possible, the team simply removed the back half of bodywork from their Veyron. Without the body panels, the Veyron can show off its engine, exhaust, and suspension more freely. 

If you’re not familiar, the Bugatti Veyron was the world’s fastest production car from 2005 to 2007 with a top speed of 253.81 mph. The Veyron was dethroned by the SSC Ultima Aero in 2007, but the Veyron returned with a more power SS trim that elevated its top speed to 267 mph. The Veyron SS’s top speed record stood for seven years until it was beaten by the Koenigsegg Agera RS’s top speed run of 277 mph in 2017. 

The Bugatti Veyron created the hypercar segment and elevated every aspect of what a road car could be. The Bugatti Veyron famous cost £1 million which was an absurd amount upon its debut in 2005, but now we routinely see hypercars listed for millions. Besides the top speed and performance, the luxury of the Veyron was a shock. Before the Veyron’s record run the stripped-down McLaren F1 held the production car top speed record. The McLaren F1 was a spartan driver's car, while the Veyron was a plush leather capsule completely shifting what a top-level hypercar should be. 

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If you owned a Bugatti Veyron would you modify it? I’m not so sure I would as I feel the Veyron is perfect as is, however, I’m glad there are owners out there willing to modify and drive their million-dollar hypercars.