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Business owners to host man vs food challenge as part of new restaurant lunch

Business owners to host man vs food challenge as part of new restaurant lunch <i>(Image: Newsquest)</i>
Business owners to host man vs food challenge as part of new restaurant lunch (Image: Newsquest)

A CHARITY founder will be taking part in a man vs food challenge.

Les Hoey was inspired to bring joy to children with serious illnesses after his daughter was diagnosed with leukaemia in 1992.

More than 30 years later, the Les Hoey Dreammaker Foundation is still making wishes come true by arranging meet and greets, concert tickets, donating iPads and much more.

To raise money for the charity, Shelly Ford and Tracy Smith, owners of Hank Marvin Larkhall are hosting a charity day.

Glasgow Times:
Glasgow Times:

READ MORE: Les Hoey MBE celebrates 30 years of making dreams come true for sick kids

The cousins have recently taken over Hank Marvin Uddingston and are hosting a launch day on Monday, which will involve raffles.

Les will be taking part in a man vs food challenge at 12pm.

Glasgow Times:
Glasgow Times:

Shelly, 43, said: “Les will be taking on our ‘out of this world’ burger. We are not revealing what will be in it yet as it’s going to be a surprise.

“It will be served with potato wedges, and he will have 30 minutes to eat it.

“Les has completed five man vs food challenges before in all different places and has never been beaten – he’s always passed them.”

Hank Marvin has pledged to feed one dreammaker family each week.

Shelly said: “One family can come and have their dinner on us. We know how hard it can be in hospitals so we can deliver the meals there or to their house.

“The Dreammaker Foundation is an amazing charity. We have the utmost respect for Les and his team, we back them 100% which is why we wanted to give something back.”

Tea, coffee and rolls will be free until 2pm.

In October, we revealed that the Dreammaker Foundation celebrated its 30th birthday.

Glasgow Times:
Glasgow Times:

Les, from Wishaw, said: “The best part is to see the kids getting better and surviving.

“But if we can take their minds off getting their treatment, that’s a big difference. I’ve seen kids get radiotherapy and you feel as if they’re not going to make a concert and sure enough, the parents phone you up and say that they’re raring to go.

“You know yourself, if you go to the dentist and come home you don’t want to go anywhere. But these kids, after getting gruelling radiotherapy and chemotherapy, they’re dancing at the concerts.”