Buzz Aldrin leads 50th anniversary celebration of humanity walking on the moon

Asher Mcshane
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Buzz Aldrin leads 50th anniversary celebration of humanity walking on the moon

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin joined tens of thousands of people around the world in marking the 50th anniversary of humanity's first moon landing.Mr Aldrin accompanied US vice president Mike Pence to Florida's Kennedy Space Centre on Saturday night and showed him the pad where he began that momentous journey 50 years ago.Mr Aldrin was later given a standing ovation during a speech by Mr Pence honouring the Apollo 11 mission which touched down on July 20 1969.Mission commander Neil Armstrong, the first man to step on to the moon on July 21, 1969, died seven years ago.Command module pilot Michael Collins did not attend the Florida celebration.Mr Pence said Apollo 11 was the only event of the 20th century that "stands a chance of being widely remembered in the 30th century".He reiterated the Trump administration's push to put Americans back on the moon by 2024.The golden anniversary is being celebrated at events across the US with further commemorations taking place elsewhere around the world.At the Kennedy Space Centre cars were backed up for miles Saturday outside the visitor complex.In Armstrong's home town of Wapakoneta, Ohio, runners competed in Run to the Moon races.The celebrations coincided with the arrival of a Russian space capsule with three astronauts aboard at the International Space Station.The Soyuz capsule docked just six hours and 20 minutes after blasting off from Russia's launch complex in Baikonur, Kazakhstan.The launch took place on the 50th anniversary of the day US astronauts landed on the moon.The capsule is carrying Andrew Morgan of the United States on his first spaceflight, Russian Alexander Skvortsov on his third mission to the space station and Italian Luca Parmitano.They will join Russian Alexey Ovchinin and Americans Nick Hague and Christina Koch have been aboard since March.The crew patch for the expedition echoes the one from Apollo 11's 1969 lunar mission.

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin joined tens of thousands of people around the world in marking the 50th anniversary of humanity's first moon landing.

Mr Aldrin accompanied US vice president Mike Pence to Florida's Kennedy Space Centre on Saturday night and showed him the pad where he began that momentous journey 50 years ago.

Mr Aldrin was later given a standing ovation during a speech by Mr Pence honouring the Apollo 11 mission which touched down on July 20 1969.

Mission commander Neil Armstrong, the first man to step on to the moon on July 21, 1969, died seven years ago.

Video footage of people watching the original Apollo 11 mission blast off (AFP/Getty Images)

Command module pilot Michael Collins did not attend the Florida celebration.

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin greets the crowd at the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing (REUTERS)

Mr Pence said Apollo 11 was the only event of the 20th century that "stands a chance of being widely remembered in the 30th century".

A picture of US astronaut Neil Armstrong walking on the Moon is projected on the Mole Antonelliana of Turin, Italy (EPA)

He reiterated the Trump administration's push to put Americans back on the moon by 2024.

The Soyuz MS-13 rocket launch coincided with the anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing (AFP/Getty Images)

The golden anniversary is being celebrated at events across the US with further commemorations taking place elsewhere around the world.

At the Kennedy Space Centre cars were backed up for miles Saturday outside the visitor complex.

In Armstrong's home town of Wapakoneta, Ohio, runners competed in Run to the Moon races.

The celebrations coincided with the arrival of a Russian space capsule with three astronauts aboard at the International Space Station.

The Soyuz capsule docked just six hours and 20 minutes after blasting off from Russia's launch complex in Baikonur, Kazakhstan.

The launch took place on the 50th anniversary of the day US astronauts landed on the moon.

The capsule is carrying Andrew Morgan of the United States on his first spaceflight, Russian Alexander Skvortsov on his third mission to the space station and Italian Luca Parmitano.

They will join Russian Alexey Ovchinin and Americans Nick Hague and Christina Koch have been aboard since March.

The crew patch for the expedition echoes the one from Apollo 11's 1969 lunar mission.