Caitlyn Jenner says it was ‘easier’ coming out as trans than it was Republican. Yes, really

·2-min read

Caitlyn Jenner has said it was “easier” for her to come out as trans to her family than it was saying she’s running for governor as a Republican.

Jenner, 71, told FOX 11’s weekly show The Issue Is on Friday (4 June) that as much as revealing to her family – and then the world – in 2015 that she is trans was difficult, it didn’t compare to, er, declaring she’s a Republican.

Her family, she recalled, weren’t exactly thrilled to learn that she planned to launch her bid to unseat incumbent governor Gavin Newsom in the deeply blue state of California.

Host Elex Michaelson quizzed Jenner on whether former step-daughter Kim Kardashian would advise her on criminal justice reform.

Laughing, Jenner replied: “One thing, and I’ve talked to all my family about running for governor and to be honest with you, it was easier to come out as trans than as a Republican candidate for governor, it was a lot tougher to sell.”

“I think Kimberly has done an amazing job with criminal justice reform,” she continued.

“I think she’s spot on. I have not asked her to be involved in my campaign, but I guarantee you, as time goes on and I become governor, I’m sure she’ll have my ear.”

Elsewhere in the interview, Michaelson asked the reality television show star exactly what “qualifications”, if any, she has to seek the highest office in the state.

Democratic governor of California Gavin Newsom
Democratic governor of California Gavin Newsom (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

Caitlyn Jenner vaulted herself into an already crowded pool of GOP candidates earlier this year, which include former city mayors, business moguls and congress members.

So what, Michaelson asked, distinguishes her from the pack?

“I think I’ve been preparing for this moment pretty much all my life,” Jenner replied.

Reflecting on her achievements in athletics as an Olympic gold medal-winning decathlete, Jenner came in with her regular wrap on the so-called “decline” of California.

“I love this state, so many of my friends have left this state,” she said.

“I’ve lived in Malibu really since 1976, honestly, I don’t want to leave, I want to be an example to so many people that, you know, if you don’t like what’s going on, stand up, and I’m willing to stand up.”

Jenner previously described how her wealthy friends are packing up and leaving California because they don’t want to see people experiencing homeless.

Her message of a California in decline has overall failed to resonate with voters, pollsters have found. In positioning herself as an above-the-fray outsider, just six per cent of voters would even consider voting for her.