Cate Blanchett yearns for bygone age when women didn't yell

Craig Simpson
Blanchett said women are in a "Groundhog Day" of ­recycled political battles - PA

Cate Blanchett has claimed that women have lost the art of civilised public debate and are instead resorting to "haranguing matches and shouting".

The Oscar-winning actress who takes the part of conservative ­author Phyllis Schlafly in the new TV drama Mrs America said she ­admired the way women would speak in the Seventies.

"There was a real strong ­culture of robust public debate and I feel like that is something we've lost, not just in America but globally," she told ­Radio Times.

"We've got haranguing matches and shouting but we haven't got a sense of public ­discourse - and these women ­actually talked and debated these things through.

"They didn't always agree with one another, but the discussion was part of the process and I feel that has been really lost."

Blanchett's observations come just weeks after JK Rowling came under fire for her views on transgender issues.

Harry Potter star Emma Watson was among those critical of the author's comments.

Watson, who played Hermione in the film franchise based on the author's books, tweeted: "Trans people are who they say they are and deserve to live their lives without being constantly questioned or told they aren't who they say they are."

Other stars that have been criticised by LBGT supporters include actress Scarlett Johansson for accepting a role as a transgender person and feminist author Germaine Greer for being a "rape apologist".

Blanchett said while contested issues remain unchanged, the topics of discussion 50 years ago are now fought over in polemical terms, with opposing parties arguing over "same-sex bathrooms" and "same-sex marriage" in a "Groundhog Day" of ­recycled and refought political ­battles.

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