Census data 2011 England and Wales: Five statistics you may have missed

General population numbers might be the main talking point of the 2011 Census data, but there are many more intriguing statistics which show how England and Wales has changed in the past decade.

The recently-released Census data has, as it often does, drawn focus on the ethnic make-up of the population in England and Wales.

The headline statistics from the nationwide data are usually based around the overall population, and how it has been affected by migration in the past decade.

General population numbers might be the main talking point, but there are many more intriguing statistics which show how England and Wales has changed since 2001.


FEWER CHRISTIANS, MORE WITH 'NO RELIGION'


As well as population findings and insights into the economy, the Census always gives a fascinating glimpse into the religious make-up of Britain.

This year, those describing themselves as 'Christian' fell from 37.3m in 2001 to 33.2m a decade on.

More than a quarter of the population say they have 'no religion', with the numbers in this category shooting up by 6m to 14.1m, making it the second most common 'religious' affiliation.

Muslim was the third most common category, with numbers rising from 1.5 million (3 per cent) to 2.7 million (4.8 per cent) since 2001.

A quarter of Britons now class themselves as having 'no religion' (ONS)

MORE THAN A QUARTER OF BRITONS HAVE A DEGREE

The Census also asked people what level of qualifications they have. Results showed that 27% (12.4m) last year had a Bachelors degree or higher.

This figure was higher than those that had no qualifications; 23 per cent (10.3 million). This group included those who were 16 and over and still studying for qualifications.

Geographically, residents in London were statistically the most qualified - 38 per cent (2.5m) said they had a level four or higher qualification (Bachelors degree and above).

They were followed by the south-east region in general, where 30 per cent (2.1m) had a level 4 qualification.

The north-east had the lowest number of level 4 qualifications, with 22 per cent (473,000).

More than one in four in England and Wales now has a degree or higher (ONS)

3.4M MORE CARS AND VANS ON THE ROADS

In 2001, there were 23.9m cars and vans available to people in England and Wales. Last year, that number had increased to 27.3m.

The rise is actually relatively similar to the increase in the usually resident population (up 3.7m).

Ten years ago there were on average 11 cars to every 10 households - in the 2011 Census this had gone up to 12 cars per 10 houses.

There are now 3m more cars and vans on the roads than a decade ago (ONS)

NEARLY 3M MORE LIVE WITH CENTRAL HEATING

The vast majority of houses in England and Wales in 2011 reported that they had central heating (97 per cent, 22.7 million).

A decade ago, this was five per cent lower at 92 per cent (19.8 million).

Houses built in the intervening 10 years will have had central heating as a standard feature.

RETAIL AND MOTOR REPAIR THE MOST POPULAR JOBS


Over 26m people in England and Wales aged 16 to 74 said what industry they work in as part of the Census.

The largest employer is wholesale and retail, along with repair of motor vehicles and motor cycles, coming in at 15.9 per cent (4.2m) of respondents.

This was more than 3 per cent higher (900,000) than the second most common area of work; human health and social work activities (3.3m).

Elsewhere, education, manufacturing and construction completed the top five most common industries of work in England and Wales last year.