Latest Cern News

  • Minor glitch delays restart of Large Hadron Collider Tue, Mar 24, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Officials say a minor glitch will delay the re-start of Europe's multi-billion dollar Large Hadron Collider either a couple of days or more than a month. More »

  • Did Cosmic Inflation Really Jump-Start the Universe? (Kavli Hangout)
    Did Cosmic Inflation Really Jump-Start the Universe? (Kavli Hangout) Mon, Mar 23, 2015

    Kelen Tuttle, writer and editor for The Kavli Foundation, contributed this article to Space.com's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. The oldest light in the universe, the cosmic microwave background, is a fossil from the Big Bang that fills every square inch of the sky. Researchers working on the Planck satellite — which detects distant light from its orbit 930,000 miles above Earth — released new maps of the cosmic microwave background. In a second publication, scientists on both Planck and the Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization 2 (BICEP2) experiment — which, from its site at the South Pole, studies the cosmic microwave background — announced that previous data, which seemed to offer "smoking gun" evidence of inflation, had been misunderstood. More »

  • Cern labs finetune measurement of Higgs boson
    Cern labs finetune measurement of Higgs boson Tue, Mar 17, 2015

    Physicists at the world's largest particle collider have made the most accurate measurement yet of the Higgs boson, which was found after a nearly half-century quest, CERN said on Tuesday. More »

  • Cern's Large Hadron Collider re-starts after two-year shutdown
    Cern's Large Hadron Collider re-starts after two-year shutdown Fri, Mar 13, 2015

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which was at the origin of the discovery of the long-sought Higgs Boson in 2012 and which was shut down for upgrades in 2013, is now improved and ready to do science again, the scientists of the European Centre for Nuclear Research (Cern) said on 12 March in Geneva. The first run of the particle accelerator, carried out at lower power, led in 2012 to confirmation of the existence of the Higgs boson particle, which explains how fundamental matter took on the mass to form stars and planets. "We are really excited because we are entering a new phase of LHC after two years of heavy maintenance, heavy improvements of the whole accelerator's chain, of the whole infrastructures. Scientists at the Cern physics research centre said the mystery dark matter that makes up 96 percent of the stuff of the universe will be a prime target for their souped-up Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the coming years. More »

  • Amped-Up Atom Smasher Will Look For New Particles, Dark Matter
    Amped-Up Atom Smasher Will Look For New Particles, Dark Matter Thu, Mar 12, 2015

    The world's largest particle accelerator, which famously discovered the long-sought Higgs boson in 2012, will soon start up again at almost double the energy of its first run. After a two-year hiatus for upgrades, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland, will be able to produce particle collisions at an energy of 13 teraelectron volts (TeV) by May, compared to the 8-TeV collisions during previous operations, CERN officials said at a news conference today (March 12). This could include finding other Higgs bosons, or producing dark matter, the mysterious substance that makes up about 85 percent of the total matter in the universe, researchers said. The LHC consists of a 17-mile-long (27 kilometers) ring of superconducting magnets that accelerates particles to near the speed of light. More »

  • CERN's revamped particle smasher ready to push physics into unknown
    CERN's revamped particle smasher ready to push physics into unknown Thu, Mar 12, 2015

    Europe's physics lab CERN said Thursday it had begun tests in preparation for rebooting the world's biggest particle collider and trying to uncover new particles that could alter our understanding of the Universe. More »

  • Bigger crashes promised in 2nd run of Large Hadron Collider
    Bigger crashes promised in 2nd run of Large Hadron Collider Thu, Mar 12, 2015

    Scientists will soon debut the blockbuster sequel to the so-called Big Bang Machine, which already found the elusive Higgs Boson. They're promising nearly twice the energy and far more violent particle crashes this time around. More »

  • Hadron collider's dark matter quest
    Hadron collider's dark matter quest Thu, Mar 12, 2015

    A "new era" in science is expected to dawn in two weeks time as scientists re-start the world's biggest and most powerful atom-smasher after a two-year upgrade. More »

  • Dark Matter Could Help Solve Sun Mystery
    Dark Matter Could Help Solve Sun Mystery Fri, Mar 6, 2015

    Dark matter may be one of the greatest mysteries of the universe, but it could help solve a puzzle about the sun that has been baffling scientists for years, researchers say. Normal matter is asymmetric as well — for instance, there are far more protons than antiprotons in the universe. More »

  • Wow! Watch a Drone Fly Through the World's Largest Atom Smasher
    Wow! Watch a Drone Fly Through the World's Largest Atom Smasher Thu, Mar 5, 2015

    It's safe to say the world's largest atom smasher is big. A new video shot by a drone flying over and through the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) provides unique views of the immense particle detector, which is located underground near Geneva in Switzerland. The LHC's ring is 16 miles (27 kilometers) long. The LHC's largest magnets weigh 35 tons and are about 50 feet (15 meters) long. More »

  • Higgs unveils plaque in his honour
    Higgs unveils plaque in his honour Tue, Mar 3, 2015

    Nobel Prize-winning scientist Professor Peter Higgs has unveiled a plaque honouring his work at the site in his home city where he devised his theory on the nature of mass more than 50 years ago. More »

  • Forging Metamaterials: Labs Craft Invisibility Cloaks, Perfect Lenses and Nanostructures …
    Forging Metamaterials: Labs Craft Invisibility Cloaks, Perfect Lenses and Nanostructures … Mon, Mar 2, 2015

    Alan Brown, writer and editor for the Kavli Foundation, edited this roundtable for Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. The very fact that we have to specify the type of metamaterial tells you that any definition is not as simple as saying it's just something that doesn't exist in nature. More »

  • Planck Satellite Brings Early Universe into Focus (Kavli Hangout)
    Planck Satellite Brings Early Universe into Focus (Kavli Hangout) Sat, Feb 21, 2015

    Kelen Tuttle, writer and editor for the Kavli Foundation, contributed this article to Space.com's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. From its orbit 930,000 miles above Earth, the Planck satellite spent more than four years detecting the oldest light in the universe: the cosmic microwave background radiation. Just last week, Planck released new maps of the cosmic microwave background supporting the theory of cosmic inflation, which posits that the universe underwent a monumental expansion in the moments following the Big Bang. On Feb. 18 from 2:30 to 3:15 p.m. EST, George Efstathiou, Clement Pryke and Paul Steinhardt will answer your questions in a Google Hangout about the earliest light in the universe, what it can tell us about the theory of inflation, and what we can expect to learn about the very early universe in the coming decade. More »

  • World's Largest Atom Smasher Returns: 4 Things It Could Find
    World's Largest Atom Smasher Returns: 4 Things It Could Find Thu, Feb 19, 2015

    The world's largest particle collider is gearing up for another run of smashing particles together at nearly the speed of light. After a two-year hiatus for upgrades, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will restart this year, and is expected to be twice as powerful as it was during its first run. In 2012, the LHC helped to find evidence of the Higgs boson, the particle that is thought to explain how other particles get their mass. The discovery vindicated theoretical calculations made decades ago, and bolstered the Standard Model, the current framework of particle physics. More »

  • Searching for Susy: Collider to push physics frontier
    Searching for Susy: Collider to push physics frontier Wed, Feb 18, 2015

    Excitement is mounting at the world's largest proton smasher, where scientists are close to launching a superpowered hunt for particles that may change our understanding of the Universe. More »

  • New particle in physics may be found this year
    New particle in physics may be found this year Sun, Feb 15, 2015

    The world's largest atom-smasher could help physicists understand mysterious dark matter in the universe, and later this year it may offer a discovery even more fascinating than the Higgs-Boson, researchers say. More »

  • Cerner meets 4Q profit forecasts Tue, Feb 10, 2015

    On a per-share basis, the Kansas City, Missouri-based company said it had net income of 42 cents. Earnings, adjusted for stock option expense and costs related to mergers and acquisitions, were 47 cents ... More »

  • An Evolving Guide to the (Unfinished) Universe (Op-Ed)
    An Evolving Guide to the (Unfinished) Universe (Op-Ed) Tue, Feb 10, 2015

    Thanks to the glacial pace of the publishing world, it would be almost another year and a half before the book hit the shelves, so I started (quietly) praying that there wouldn't be any new universe-shattering discoveries made before the book made it into print. Fortunately, for me at least, the Large Hadron Collider was taken off-line for an upgrade and some of the great space-based telescopes conveniently ran out of stuff like helium coolant and no major discoveries were made. The great joy of astronomy (and, indeed, science in general) is that some of the biggest discoveries — the real game changers that alter our perception of how the universe works — are those that we could never have anticipated in advance. At the time, the idea of a Big Crunch seemed to be a logical extension of the Big Bang. More »

  • Particle may explain matter mystery
    Particle may explain matter mystery Sun, Feb 1, 2015

    A completely new type of fundamental particle may explain the mystery of "dark matter", the missing material that makes up more than 80% of the universe's mass, according to British scientists. More »

  • Did Gravity Save the Universe from 'God Particle' Higgs Boson?
    Did Gravity Save the Universe from 'God Particle' Higgs Boson? Thu, Jan 8, 2015

    The recently discovered Higgs boson, which helps give particles their mass, could have destroyed the cosmos shortly after it was born, causing the universe to collapse just after the Big Bang. In 2012, scientists confirmed the detection of the long-sought Higgs boson, also known by its nickname the "God particle," at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the most powerful particle accelerator on the planet. This particle helps give mass to all elementary particles that have mass, such as electrons and protons. Elementary particles that do not have mass, such as the photons that make up light, do not get mass from the Higgs boson. More »

  • Brain Observatories and Dark Matter: Scientists' Resolutions for 2015 Thu, Jan 1, 2015

    It's that time of year — as 2014 draws to a close, people around the country are making lists of their New Year's resolutions. It is a golden age for those of us studying dinosaurs, so one of my wishes is to find a new dinosaur in 2015! I was part of the team that named Qianzhousaurus sinensis (nicknamed "Pinocchio rex") last year. I would like to do more to synthesize the ever-growing fossil record that we currently have, to go beyond finding and describing fossils to look at bigger questions about dinosaur genealogy and evolution. The researchers at the Allen Institute for Brain Science have two resolutions for 2015. More »

  • LHC team's 'unfinished business'
    LHC team's 'unfinished business' Thu, Jan 1, 2015

    British scientists are gearing up to complete "unfinished business" with the universe after the world's biggest atom smashing machine restarts this year. More »

  • Atom Smasher Will Renew Hunt for Strange Particles in 2015
    Atom Smasher Will Renew Hunt for Strange Particles in 2015 Mon, Dec 29, 2014

    The particle accelerator has already discovered the Higgs boson, the so-called "God particle," and when it comes back online after two years spent on upgrades, researchers suggest it could discover other kinds of these God particles, as well as extra dimensions of reality and the identity of the mysterious dark matter that makes up most of the mass in the universe. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest particle collider in the world, with a ring about 16 miles (27 kilometers) in circumference. It accelerates particles to nearly the speed of light using close to 9,600 magnets, comprised of about 10,000 tons of iron, more than in the Eiffel Tower. They can generate a magnetic field more than 100,000 times more powerful than Earth's. These magnets require cooling from liquid helium, making the LHC the largest refrigerator in the world — the magnets operate at temperatures of minus 456.3 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 271.3 degrees Celsius), colder than outer space. More »

  • 'Shipping' and the Enduring Appeal of Rooting for Love
    'Shipping' and the Enduring Appeal of Rooting for Love Sat, Dec 27, 2014

    It was an electric June night in Flushing. Star-crossed Mets phenom Dwight Gooden made his first start following a drug suspension handed down that April, and the Amazin’s beat the Pirates 5-1. But what made that evening in 1987 truly extraordinary was not the play of the defending World Champion Mets (sigh). ... More »

  • CERN nuclear physics lab admits Pakistan Fri, Dec 19, 2014

    GENEVA (AP) — The world's top particle physics lab has admitted Pakistan as an associate member, a year after Israel was voted in as a full member. More »

  • 8 Scientists Who Are Changing The World
    8 Scientists Who Are Changing The World Wed, Dec 17, 2014

    As Stephen Hawking biopic ‘The Theory Of Everything’ comes to cinemas, here are some of the brightest minds making Earth a better place as we speak… More »

  • CERN gears up to relaunch high energy particle collider
    CERN gears up to relaunch high energy particle collider Fri, Dec 12, 2014

    Europe's physics lab CERN said Friday it was on schedule to fire up the world's biggest particle smasher again early next year, with almost double the energy of its previous run. More »

  • Giant European particle collider ready for 2nd run Fri, Dec 12, 2014

    GENEVA (AP) — The scientific organization that operates the world's biggest particle accelerator says it's gearing up for a second three-year run. More »

  • Russell Brand vs Nigel Farage: Question Time clash between 'messiah of hipster …
    Russell Brand vs Nigel Farage: Question Time clash between 'messiah of hipster … Fri, Dec 12, 2014

    The only time Nigel Farage and Russell Brand should meet is at the speed of light in the Large Hadron Collider. But meet they did on the BBC's Question Time, a programme inspired by the phrase "exercise in futility". More »

  • 15 Reasons Why 1994 Seems Like A Long Time Ago
    15 Reasons Why 1994 Seems Like A Long Time Ago Thu, Dec 11, 2014

    Can you believe 1994 is 20 years ago? Here are some things from that year which will make you realise how old you are… More »

  • Web inventor says Internet should be 'human right' Thu, Dec 11, 2014

    LONDON (AP) — The computer scientist credited with inventing the World Wide Web says affordable access to the Internet should be recognized as a human right, as a report showed that billions of people still cannot go online and government surveillance and censorship are increasing. More »

  • Invisible Dark Matter May Show Up in GPS Signals
    Invisible Dark Matter May Show Up in GPS Signals Tue, Dec 2, 2014

    GPS satellites are crucial for navigation, but now researchers think this technology could be used for an unexpected purpose: finding traces of enigmatic dark matter that is thought to lurk throughout the universe. Without the extra force of gravity from dark matter, researchers say, galaxies wouldn't be able to hold themselves together. Physicists don't know what dark matter is made of, but some think it's composed of particles that barely interact with the visible world, which is why dark matter is invisible and has been difficult to detect. However, Andrei Derevianko, a professor of physics at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Maxim Pospelov, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, have proposed that dark matter isn't made of particles at all. More »

  • Never-Before-Seen Particles Discovered at Swiss Collider
    Never-Before-Seen Particles Discovered at Swiss Collider Fri, Nov 21, 2014

    Two new subatomic particles have popped up at the world's largest atom smasher. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) near Geneva, Switzerland, is a veritable particle piñata: The massive underground machine accelerates two beams of protons to nearly the speed of light and smashes them together. One of the experiments at the LHC, called LHCb, identified two never-before-seen baryon particles in their most recent particle cache. Quarks are believed to be truly fundamental particles, meaning they are not made up of smaller particles. More »

  • The Proton and Neutron Just Got Two New Subatomic Cousins
    The Proton and Neutron Just Got Two New Subatomic Cousins Wed, Nov 19, 2014

    Using the same massive particle accelerator that found the elusive Higgs Boson in 2012, physicists at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) announced that they discovered two new "heavy-weight" subatomic particles on Wednesday. More »

  • Particle collider notches up two new finds
    Particle collider notches up two new finds Wed, Nov 19, 2014

    Experiments at the world's biggest particle smasher have confirmed the existence of two theorised sub-atomic particles, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) said on Wednesday. More »