Latest Cern News

  • World's Largest Atom Smasher Returns: 4 Things It Could Find
    World's Largest Atom Smasher Returns: 4 Things It Could Find Thu, Feb 19, 2015

    The world's largest particle collider is gearing up for another run of smashing particles together at nearly the speed of light. After a two-year hiatus for upgrades, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will restart this year, and is expected to be twice as powerful as it was during its first run. In 2012, the LHC helped to find evidence of the Higgs boson, the particle that is thought to explain how other particles get their mass. The discovery vindicated theoretical calculations made decades ago, and bolstered the Standard Model, the current framework of particle physics. More »

  • Searching for Susy: Collider to push physics frontier
    Searching for Susy: Collider to push physics frontier Wed, Feb 18, 2015

    Excitement is mounting at the world's largest proton smasher, where scientists are close to launching a superpowered hunt for particles that may change our understanding of the Universe. More »

  • New particle in physics may be found this year
    New particle in physics may be found this year Sun, Feb 15, 2015

    The world's largest atom-smasher could help physicists understand mysterious dark matter in the universe, and later this year it may offer a discovery even more fascinating than the Higgs-Boson, researchers say. More »

  • Cerner meets 4Q profit forecasts Tue, Feb 10, 2015

    On a per-share basis, the Kansas City, Missouri-based company said it had net income of 42 cents. Earnings, adjusted for stock option expense and costs related to mergers and acquisitions, were 47 cents ... More »

  • An Evolving Guide to the (Unfinished) Universe (Op-Ed)
    An Evolving Guide to the (Unfinished) Universe (Op-Ed) Tue, Feb 10, 2015

    Thanks to the glacial pace of the publishing world, it would be almost another year and a half before the book hit the shelves, so I started (quietly) praying that there wouldn't be any new universe-shattering discoveries made before the book made it into print. Fortunately, for me at least, the Large Hadron Collider was taken off-line for an upgrade and some of the great space-based telescopes conveniently ran out of stuff like helium coolant and no major discoveries were made. The great joy of astronomy (and, indeed, science in general) is that some of the biggest discoveries — the real game changers that alter our perception of how the universe works — are those that we could never have anticipated in advance. At the time, the idea of a Big Crunch seemed to be a logical extension of the Big Bang. More »

  • Particle may explain matter mystery
    Particle may explain matter mystery Sun, Feb 1, 2015

    A completely new type of fundamental particle may explain the mystery of "dark matter", the missing material that makes up more than 80% of the universe's mass, according to British scientists. More »

  • Did Gravity Save the Universe from 'God Particle' Higgs Boson?
    Did Gravity Save the Universe from 'God Particle' Higgs Boson? Thu, Jan 8, 2015

    The recently discovered Higgs boson, which helps give particles their mass, could have destroyed the cosmos shortly after it was born, causing the universe to collapse just after the Big Bang. In 2012, scientists confirmed the detection of the long-sought Higgs boson, also known by its nickname the "God particle," at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the most powerful particle accelerator on the planet. This particle helps give mass to all elementary particles that have mass, such as electrons and protons. Elementary particles that do not have mass, such as the photons that make up light, do not get mass from the Higgs boson. More »

  • Brain Observatories and Dark Matter: Scientists' Resolutions for 2015 Thu, Jan 1, 2015

    It's that time of year — as 2014 draws to a close, people around the country are making lists of their New Year's resolutions. It is a golden age for those of us studying dinosaurs, so one of my wishes is to find a new dinosaur in 2015! I was part of the team that named Qianzhousaurus sinensis (nicknamed "Pinocchio rex") last year. I would like to do more to synthesize the ever-growing fossil record that we currently have, to go beyond finding and describing fossils to look at bigger questions about dinosaur genealogy and evolution. The researchers at the Allen Institute for Brain Science have two resolutions for 2015. More »

  • LHC team's 'unfinished business'
    LHC team's 'unfinished business' Thu, Jan 1, 2015

    British scientists are gearing up to complete "unfinished business" with the universe after the world's biggest atom smashing machine restarts this year. More »

  • Atom Smasher Will Renew Hunt for Strange Particles in 2015
    Atom Smasher Will Renew Hunt for Strange Particles in 2015 Mon, Dec 29, 2014

    The particle accelerator has already discovered the Higgs boson, the so-called "God particle," and when it comes back online after two years spent on upgrades, researchers suggest it could discover other kinds of these God particles, as well as extra dimensions of reality and the identity of the mysterious dark matter that makes up most of the mass in the universe. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest particle collider in the world, with a ring about 16 miles (27 kilometers) in circumference. It accelerates particles to nearly the speed of light using close to 9,600 magnets, comprised of about 10,000 tons of iron, more than in the Eiffel Tower. They can generate a magnetic field more than 100,000 times more powerful than Earth's. These magnets require cooling from liquid helium, making the LHC the largest refrigerator in the world — the magnets operate at temperatures of minus 456.3 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 271.3 degrees Celsius), colder than outer space. More »

  • 'Shipping' and the Enduring Appeal of Rooting for Love
    'Shipping' and the Enduring Appeal of Rooting for Love Sat, Dec 27, 2014

    It was an electric June night in Flushing. Star-crossed Mets phenom Dwight Gooden made his first start following a drug suspension handed down that April, and the Amazin’s beat the Pirates 5-1. But what made that evening in 1987 truly extraordinary was not the play of the defending World Champion Mets (sigh). ... More »

  • CERN nuclear physics lab admits Pakistan Fri, Dec 19, 2014

    GENEVA (AP) — The world's top particle physics lab has admitted Pakistan as an associate member, a year after Israel was voted in as a full member. More »

  • 8 Scientists Who Are Changing The World
    8 Scientists Who Are Changing The World Wed, Dec 17, 2014

    As Stephen Hawking biopic ‘The Theory Of Everything’ comes to cinemas, here are some of the brightest minds making Earth a better place as we speak… More »

  • CERN gears up to relaunch high energy particle collider
    CERN gears up to relaunch high energy particle collider Fri, Dec 12, 2014

    Europe's physics lab CERN said Friday it was on schedule to fire up the world's biggest particle smasher again early next year, with almost double the energy of its previous run. More »

  • Particle collider ready for new run
    Particle collider ready for new run Fri, Dec 12, 2014

    The scientific organisation that operates the world's biggest particle accelerator has said it is gearing up for a second three-year run. More »

  • Giant European particle collider ready for 2nd run Fri, Dec 12, 2014

    GENEVA (AP) — The scientific organization that operates the world's biggest particle accelerator says it's gearing up for a second three-year run. More »

  • Russell Brand vs Nigel Farage: Question Time clash between 'messiah of hipster …
    Russell Brand vs Nigel Farage: Question Time clash between 'messiah of hipster … Fri, Dec 12, 2014

    The only time Nigel Farage and Russell Brand should meet is at the speed of light in the Large Hadron Collider. But meet they did on the BBC's Question Time, a programme inspired by the phrase "exercise in futility". More »

  • 15 Reasons Why 1994 Seems Like A Long Time Ago
    15 Reasons Why 1994 Seems Like A Long Time Ago Thu, Dec 11, 2014

    Can you believe 1994 is 20 years ago? Here are some things from that year which will make you realise how old you are… More »

  • Web inventor says Internet should be 'human right' Thu, Dec 11, 2014

    LONDON (AP) — The computer scientist credited with inventing the World Wide Web says affordable access to the Internet should be recognized as a human right, as a report showed that billions of people still cannot go online and government surveillance and censorship are increasing. More »

  • Invisible Dark Matter May Show Up in GPS Signals
    Invisible Dark Matter May Show Up in GPS Signals Tue, Dec 2, 2014

    GPS satellites are crucial for navigation, but now researchers think this technology could be used for an unexpected purpose: finding traces of enigmatic dark matter that is thought to lurk throughout the universe. Without the extra force of gravity from dark matter, researchers say, galaxies wouldn't be able to hold themselves together. Physicists don't know what dark matter is made of, but some think it's composed of particles that barely interact with the visible world, which is why dark matter is invisible and has been difficult to detect. However, Andrei Derevianko, a professor of physics at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Maxim Pospelov, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, have proposed that dark matter isn't made of particles at all. More »

  • Never-Before-Seen Particles Discovered at Swiss Collider
    Never-Before-Seen Particles Discovered at Swiss Collider Fri, Nov 21, 2014

    Two new subatomic particles have popped up at the world's largest atom smasher. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) near Geneva, Switzerland, is a veritable particle piñata: The massive underground machine accelerates two beams of protons to nearly the speed of light and smashes them together. One of the experiments at the LHC, called LHCb, identified two never-before-seen baryon particles in their most recent particle cache. Quarks are believed to be truly fundamental particles, meaning they are not made up of smaller particles. More »

  • The Proton and Neutron Just Got Two New Subatomic Cousins
    The Proton and Neutron Just Got Two New Subatomic Cousins Wed, Nov 19, 2014

    Using the same massive particle accelerator that found the elusive Higgs Boson in 2012, physicists at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) announced that they discovered two new "heavy-weight" subatomic particles on Wednesday. More »

  • Particle collider notches up two new finds
    Particle collider notches up two new finds Wed, Nov 19, 2014

    Experiments at the world's biggest particle smasher have confirmed the existence of two theorised sub-atomic particles, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) said on Wednesday. More »

  • CERN scientists discover 2 new subatomic particles Wed, Nov 19, 2014

    GENEVA (AP) — Scientists at the world's largest smasher said Wednesday they have discovered two new subatomic particles never seen before that could widen our understanding of the universe. More »

  • Dark Matter Murder Mystery: Is Weird Substance Destroying Neutron Stars?
    Dark Matter Murder Mystery: Is Weird Substance Destroying Neutron Stars? Tue, Nov 18, 2014

    The mysterious substance that makes up most of the matter in the universe may be destroying neutron stars by turning them into black holes in the center of the Milky Way, new research suggests. If astronomers successfully detect a neutron star dying at the metaphorical hands of dark matter, such a finding could yield critical insights on the elusive properties of material, scientists added. Dark matter — an invisible substance thought to make up five-sixths of all matter in the universe — is currently one of the greatest mysteries in science. The consensus among researchers suggests that dark matter is composed of a new type of particle, one that interacts very weakly at best with all the known forces of the universe. More »

  • Dark Matter's New Wrinkle: It May Behave Like Wavy Fluid
    Dark Matter's New Wrinkle: It May Behave Like Wavy Fluid Thu, Nov 13, 2014

    The mysterious dark matter that makes up most of the matter in the universe may behave more like wavy fluids than solid particles, helping to explain the shapes of galaxies, a new study suggests. Dark matter is one of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos. The scientific consensus is that dark matter is composed of a new type of particle, one that interacts very weakly with all the known forces of the universe and is mostly only detectable via the gravitational pull it exerts. There are two known types of particles in the universe, fermions and bosons. More »

  • Rosetta Sees Innovation Return To Europe
    Rosetta Sees Innovation Return To Europe Thu, Nov 13, 2014

    After the euphoria, a dilemma: do the Rosetta scientists stick - or twist? More »

  • Lighting the Way: A Conversation with 3 Dark Matter Explorers (Q+A)
    Lighting the Way: A Conversation with 3 Dark Matter Explorers (Q+A) Mon, Nov 10, 2014

    This month, three new experiments take significant steps in the hunt for dark matter, the elusive substance that appears to make up more than a quarter of the universe, but interacts very rarely with the matter that makes up our world. So this substance is a huge part of what makes up our universe and an important part of why our universe looks the way it does. More »

  • Why a Physics Revolution Might Be on Its Way Mon, Nov 10, 2014

    The field of physics may be turned on its head soon, said renowned physicist Nima Arkani-Hamed during a live lecture from the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada. The problem is that in some sense, the principles behind these theories seem to be impossible when physicists dig a little deeper into them, Arkani-Hamed said. The two ideas are also incredibly constraining, and they make it challenging for physicists to think outside the box and develop new ideas and theories, Arkani-Hamed said. More »

  • Higgs Boson: Illusive God Particle May not have been Discovered After All
    Higgs Boson: Illusive God Particle May not have been Discovered After All Fri, Nov 7, 2014

    The illusive Higgs particle may not have been discovered yet, scientists have said, claiming current data does not confirm the presence of the 'God particle'. More »

  • Famed Physicists Talks Quantum Mechanics and Space-Time: How to Watch Live
    Famed Physicists Talks Quantum Mechanics and Space-Time: How to Watch Live Thu, Nov 6, 2014

    Famed physicist Nima Arkani-Hamed will deliver a live lecture today (Nov. 6) about how quantum mechanics is changing human's understanding of space-time. The event, held at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada, will be webcast live, and you can tune in on Live Science tonight starting at 7 p.m. ET. Arkani-Hamed will discuss how recent quantum mechanics and particle physics research is changing how physicists understand the fundamental forces of the universe. "Often, the study of particle physics is characterized as caring about what the ultimate building blocks of matter are and finding new particles that we can give silly names to," Arkani-Hamed said in a promotional video for the lecture. More »

  • Famed Physicist Talks Quantum Mechanics and Space-Time: How to Watch Live
    Famed Physicist Talks Quantum Mechanics and Space-Time: How to Watch Live Thu, Nov 6, 2014

    Famed physicist Nima Arkani-Hamed will deliver a live lecture today (Nov. 6) about how quantum mechanics is changing human's understanding of space-time. The event, held at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada, will be webcast live, and you can tune in on Live Science tonight starting at 7 p.m. ET. Arkani-Hamed will discuss how recent quantum mechanics and particle physics research is changing how physicists understand the fundamental forces of the universe. "Often, the study of particle physics is characterized as caring about what the ultimate building blocks of matter are and finding new particles that we can give silly names to," Arkani-Hamed said in a promotional video for the lecture. More »

  • Super Smasher: Particle Colliders May Get Smaller & More Powerful
    Super Smasher: Particle Colliders May Get Smaller & More Powerful Wed, Nov 5, 2014

    Move over Large Hadron Collider. The new system, called a Wakefield accelerator, could allow scientists to make tiny but powerful particle colliders that could fit on any university campus. The premise behind all particle colliders is deceptively simple: Take a bunch of subatomic particles such as protons or electrons, make them crash into one another at incredibly high speeds, and then look at the wreckage to see what comes out, said study co-author Mark Hogan, a physicist at the Stanford Linear Accelerator, or SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California. The particle beams also need either the very long runway of a linear accelerator to gather speed, or they must bend around a circular track repeatedly, which can cause particles to spray off from the electron or proton beams, reducing the beam's tight focus. More »

  • Digital Archive Lets Web Surfers Travel Back in Time Wed, Nov 5, 2014

    There's a tool that turns your Web browser into a time machine, and librarians at Stanford University have figured out how to use it. In honor of the 25th anniversary of the World Wide Web this year, Stanford created a digital archive of its bygone Web pages, some of which were among the earliest pages ever published on the Web. Known as the Stanford Wayback, the tool is a customized version of an open-source platform — the Wayback Machine — developed by the nonprofit group Internet Archive. Among other sites, the new digital archive is home to the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory site, which was originally created in 1991 and is the earliest known website in the United States, according to Stanford. More »

  • Italian physicist Gianotti first woman to lead Cern
    Italian physicist Gianotti first woman to lead Cern Tue, Nov 4, 2014

    Italian physicist Fabiola Gianotti was chosen on Tuesday to lead the Cern particle physics research centre, the first woman to head up the globally renowned laboratory. More »