Latest Cern News

  • Dublin Bus drivers could be going on strike again
    Dublin Bus drivers could be going on strike again Fri, Apr 10, 2015

    Bad news for commuters. More »

  • This is what happens when you dump a few goldfish into a lake
  • Breast milk probably shouldn’t be bought and sold online
    Breast milk probably shouldn’t be bought and sold online Tue, Apr 7, 2015

    Unsurprising advice, really. More »

  • The 5 at 5: Monday
    The 5 at 5: Monday Mon, Apr 6, 2015

    5 minutes, 5 stories, 5 o’clock… More »

  • This BBC News typo will give you an immature LOL
  • The World's Most Powerful Atom Smasher Restarts With a Big Bang
    The World's Most Powerful Atom Smasher Restarts With a Big Bang Sun, Apr 5, 2015

    The world's most powerful atom smasher, the Large Hadron Collider, which provides a window into the universe just milliseconds after the Big Bang, came back to life this morning, after more than two years of maintenance and upgrade work, and it's stronger than ever. Then at 12:27 p.m. Geneva time, another proton beam trekked around the ring in the opposite direction, officials at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) reported today (April 5). In the first run of the restart, the LHC hit energies of 450 GeV, where one GeV is equivalent to the mass of a proton. In the coming days, LHC operators plan to amp up the energy of the proton beams to the highest ever achieved. More »

  • Hadron collider restarted after two-year upgrade
    Hadron collider restarted after two-year upgrade Sun, Apr 5, 2015

    World's largest particle smasher set in motion as scientists seek answers as to how universe came into existence. More »

  • Hadron Collider Restarts In Hunt For Dark Matter
    Hadron Collider Restarts In Hunt For Dark Matter Sun, Apr 5, 2015

    Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) hope the upgrade will allow them to smash protons together with nearly double the energy previously reached. Two beams of protons will be sent in opposite directions around LHC's 17-mile tunnel circuit on the Franco-Swiss border. In 2012, the LHC discovered the Higgs Boson, an elementary particle that gives other particles mass. More »

  • Large Hadron Collider starts up again after two-year upgrade
    Large Hadron Collider starts up again after two-year upgrade Sun, Apr 5, 2015

    The world's largest particle smasher restarted Sunday after a two-year upgrade that will allow physicists to explore uncharted corners of what makes up the universe, including dark matter and antimatter. More »

  • Giant atom smasher starts up after 2-year shutdown
    Giant atom smasher starts up after 2-year shutdown Sun, Apr 5, 2015

    BERLIN (AP) — The world's biggest particle accelerator is back in action after a two-year shutdown and upgrade, embarking on a new mission that scientists hope could give them a look into the unseen dark universe. More »

  • CERN restarts Large Hadron Collider, seeks dark universe
    CERN restarts Large Hadron Collider, seeks dark universe Sun, Apr 5, 2015

    By Robert Evans GENEVA (Reuters) - Scientists at Europe's physics research centre CERN on Sunday restarted their "Big Bang" Large Hadron Collider (LHC), embarking on a bid to probe into the "dark universe" they believe lies beyond the visible one. CERN reported that particle beams were successfully pushed around the LHC in both directions after a two-year shutdown for a major refit described as a Herculean task that doubled its power -- and its reach into the unknown. Study of many billions of collisions in the LHC's first run from 2010-2013 produced proof by 2012 of the existence of the Higgs boson and its linked force field, a long sought mechanism that gives mass to matter. With its capacity to smash particles together at almost the speed of light and at a collision energy twice that of its first run, scientists hope that the revamped LHC will produce evidence of what has been dubbed "New Physics". More »

  • LHC ramp-up boosts discoveries hope
    LHC ramp-up boosts discoveries hope Sun, Apr 5, 2015

    With the Large Hadron Collider running at energies never attained before, scientists hope to enter a new realm of physics. More »

  • Scientists restart atom-smasher
    Scientists restart atom-smasher Sun, Apr 5, 2015

    Scientists have successfully restarted the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the most powerful atom-smasher ever built, hoping to enter a new realm of physics and make history for the second time. More »

  • Collider to start dark matter hunt
    Collider to start dark matter hunt Sat, Apr 4, 2015

    The world's largest and most powerful atom smasher will be re-started tomorrow after an upgrade that could see it making scientific history for a second time. More »

  • Amped-Up Atom Smasher Will Restart This Weekend
    Amped-Up Atom Smasher Will Restart This Weekend Sat, Apr 4, 2015

    It’s a great day for particle physics fans: The world’s largest atom smasher has been cleared to start running again as early as this weekend. After a two-year hiatus, researchers and engineers planned to restart the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) last week, but an electrical short delayed the process. Scientists quickly found the glitch: a small piece of metal lodged in the wiring of one of the LHC’s powerful electromagnets. "It’s a bit like deliberately blowing a fuse," Paul Collier, head of beams at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), which manages the LHC, told Nature News. More »

  • Particle smasher set for weekend startup, says CERN
    Particle smasher set for weekend startup, says CERN Thu, Apr 2, 2015

    The world's biggest particle collider is set to restart this weekend after a two-year upgrade, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) said Thursday. More »

  • What's Next for the World's Largest Atom Smasher? How to Watch Live
    What's Next for the World's Largest Atom Smasher? How to Watch Live Wed, Apr 1, 2015

    Physicist Jon Butterworth, who works at the world's largest atom smasher, is intimately familiar with the drama that surrounded the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson. Butterworth will recount the trials and tribulations in the hunt for "the most wanted particle," in a lecture tonight (April 1) at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada. Butterworth is a physics professor at University College London in the United Kingdom, and a researcher at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), which manages the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a ring-shaped particle accelerator located underground near Geneva, Switzerland. In 2012, scientists at the LHC found evidence of the long-sought Higgs boson, an elementary particle that is thought to explain how other particles get their mass. More »

  • 6 of the Best Science-Themed April Fools' Day Jokes Wed, Apr 1, 2015

    Many poor souls have been victims of April Fools' Day jokes, and science — with it's reputation for achieving stunning and sometimes fantastic feats — makes for some of the best fodder. From harnessing the energy of thunderstorms to rounding off the number pi, here are some of history's greatest science April Fools' Day pranks to wow your nerdy friends. Researchers at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), home of the particle smasher used to discover the Higgs boson particle and other groundbreaking insights into the four fundamental forces (the strong force, the weak force, the electromagnetic force and gravity), reported today (April 1) that they had confirmed the existence of the Force — the supernatural power in the fictional "Star Wars" universe. The statement goes on to say that researchers are unsure of what causes the Force but its practical applications include long-distance communication, influencing minds and lifting heavy objects out of swamps. More »

  • CERN proves The Force exists, Albert Hall outraged at Beatles 'holes' …
    CERN proves The Force exists, Albert Hall outraged at Beatles 'holes' … Wed, Apr 1, 2015

    From a supermarket putting in trampolines for customers to reach the top shelf to prestigious CERN saying it has proved The Force exists, Wednesday brought April Fool's spoofs a-plenty. London's venerable Royal Albert Hall released an April 1, 1967 letter from its archives protesting "in the strongest conceivable terms" at having The Beatles imply in the song "Day in the Life" that there were 4,000 holes in its auditorium. Commerzbank sought a solution to Greece's financial woes, saying Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis had proposed a one-off licence fee of 1 euro on European Union users of Pythagoras’ theorem. Germany's Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung reported that the European Central Bank was opening a restaurant with a view called "Euro Sunset". More »

  • World's largest particle collider ready to restart in 'days'
    World's largest particle collider ready to restart in 'days' Wed, Apr 1, 2015

    Physicists have fixed a short-circuit at the world's largest proton smasher, making the particle-hunting machine ready for a restart "within days' time" after a two-year shutdown. More »

  • Electrical fault corrected, 'Big Bang' collider to restart soon
    Electrical fault corrected, 'Big Bang' collider to restart soon Tue, Mar 31, 2015

    CERN engineers said on Tuesday they have resolved a problem that had delayed the relaunch after a two-year refit of the Large Hadron Collider particle smasher, which is probing the mysteries of the universe. The relaunch of the so-called 'Big Bang' machine had to be postponed last week because of the problem. These collisions, at almost the speed of light, create the chaotic conditions inside the LHC close to those that followed the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago, from which the universe eventually emerged. More »

  • Today in History Mon, Mar 30, 2015

    Today is Monday, March 30, the 89th day of 2015. There are 276 days left in the year. More »

  • Huge Asteroid To Fly Past Earth This Morning
    Huge Asteroid To Fly Past Earth This Morning Fri, Mar 27, 2015

    Conspiracy websites once again proclaimed the end of life on Earth this week as a huge asteroid hurtled towards Earth More »

  • Short circuit delays particle hunter machine restart
    Short circuit delays particle hunter machine restart Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    A short-circuit at the world's largest proton smasher has indefinitely delayed the particle-hunting machine's planned restart, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) said on Wednesday. More »

  • Minor glitch delays restart of Large Hadron Collider Tue, Mar 24, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Officials say a minor glitch will delay the re-start of Europe's multi-billion dollar Large Hadron Collider either a couple of days or more than a month. More »

  • Did Cosmic Inflation Really Jump-Start the Universe? (Kavli Hangout)
    Did Cosmic Inflation Really Jump-Start the Universe? (Kavli Hangout) Mon, Mar 23, 2015

    Kelen Tuttle, writer and editor for The Kavli Foundation, contributed this article to Space.com's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. The oldest light in the universe, the cosmic microwave background, is a fossil from the Big Bang that fills every square inch of the sky. Researchers working on the Planck satellite — which detects distant light from its orbit 930,000 miles above Earth — released new maps of the cosmic microwave background. In a second publication, scientists on both Planck and the Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization 2 (BICEP2) experiment — which, from its site at the South Pole, studies the cosmic microwave background — announced that previous data, which seemed to offer "smoking gun" evidence of inflation, had been misunderstood. More »

  • Cern labs finetune measurement of Higgs boson
    Cern labs finetune measurement of Higgs boson Tue, Mar 17, 2015

    Physicists at the world's largest particle collider have made the most accurate measurement yet of the Higgs boson, which was found after a nearly half-century quest, CERN said on Tuesday. More »

  • Cern's Large Hadron Collider re-starts after two-year shutdown
    Cern's Large Hadron Collider re-starts after two-year shutdown Fri, Mar 13, 2015

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which was at the origin of the discovery of the long-sought Higgs Boson in 2012 and which was shut down for upgrades in 2013, is now improved and ready to do science again, the scientists of the European Centre for Nuclear Research (Cern) said on 12 March in Geneva. The first run of the particle accelerator, carried out at lower power, led in 2012 to confirmation of the existence of the Higgs boson particle, which explains how fundamental matter took on the mass to form stars and planets. "We are really excited because we are entering a new phase of LHC after two years of heavy maintenance, heavy improvements of the whole accelerator's chain, of the whole infrastructures. Scientists at the Cern physics research centre said the mystery dark matter that makes up 96 percent of the stuff of the universe will be a prime target for their souped-up Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the coming years. More »

  • Amped-Up Atom Smasher Will Look For New Particles, Dark Matter
    Amped-Up Atom Smasher Will Look For New Particles, Dark Matter Thu, Mar 12, 2015

    The world's largest particle accelerator, which famously discovered the long-sought Higgs boson in 2012, will soon start up again at almost double the energy of its first run. After a two-year hiatus for upgrades, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland, will be able to produce particle collisions at an energy of 13 teraelectron volts (TeV) by May, compared to the 8-TeV collisions during previous operations, CERN officials said at a news conference today (March 12). This could include finding other Higgs bosons, or producing dark matter, the mysterious substance that makes up about 85 percent of the total matter in the universe, researchers said. The LHC consists of a 17-mile-long (27 kilometers) ring of superconducting magnets that accelerates particles to near the speed of light. More »

  • CERN's revamped particle smasher ready to push physics into unknown
    CERN's revamped particle smasher ready to push physics into unknown Thu, Mar 12, 2015

    Europe's physics lab CERN said Thursday it had begun tests in preparation for rebooting the world's biggest particle collider and trying to uncover new particles that could alter our understanding of the Universe. More »

  • Bigger crashes promised in 2nd run of Large Hadron Collider
    Bigger crashes promised in 2nd run of Large Hadron Collider Thu, Mar 12, 2015

    Scientists will soon debut the blockbuster sequel to the so-called Big Bang Machine, which already found the elusive Higgs Boson. They're promising nearly twice the energy and far more violent particle crashes this time around. More »

  • Hadron collider's dark matter quest
    Hadron collider's dark matter quest Thu, Mar 12, 2015

    A "new era" in science is expected to dawn in two weeks time as scientists re-start the world's biggest and most powerful atom-smasher after a two-year upgrade. More »

  • Dark Matter Could Help Solve Sun Mystery
    Dark Matter Could Help Solve Sun Mystery Fri, Mar 6, 2015

    Dark matter may be one of the greatest mysteries of the universe, but it could help solve a puzzle about the sun that has been baffling scientists for years, researchers say. Normal matter is asymmetric as well — for instance, there are far more protons than antiprotons in the universe. More »

  • Wow! Watch a Drone Fly Through the World's Largest Atom Smasher
    Wow! Watch a Drone Fly Through the World's Largest Atom Smasher Thu, Mar 5, 2015

    It's safe to say the world's largest atom smasher is big. A new video shot by a drone flying over and through the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) provides unique views of the immense particle detector, which is located underground near Geneva in Switzerland. The LHC's ring is 16 miles (27 kilometers) long. The LHC's largest magnets weigh 35 tons and are about 50 feet (15 meters) long. More »

  • Higgs unveils plaque in his honour
    Higgs unveils plaque in his honour Tue, Mar 3, 2015

    Nobel Prize-winning scientist Professor Peter Higgs has unveiled a plaque honouring his work at the site in his home city where he devised his theory on the nature of mass more than 50 years ago. More »