Latest Cern News

  • Hints of Mysterious Dark Matter Spotted at Milky Way's Center (Video)
    Hints of Mysterious Dark Matter Spotted at Milky Way's Center (Video) Mon, Apr 7, 2014

    Astronomers have perhaps their best lead to date about the nature of dark matter, the strange and invisible stuff that dominates the material universe. The center of our Milky Way galaxy generates more high-energy gamma rays than can be explained by conventional sources such as supernova remnants and fast-spinning, super-dense neutron stars known as pulsars, a new study suggests. The "excess" may be produced by the annihilation of colliding dark matter particles. "This is a very exciting signal, and while the case is not yet closed, in the future we might well look back and say this was where we saw dark matter annihilation for the first time," co-author Tracy Slatyer, a theoretical physicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, said in a statement. More »

  • Weird 'Techni-Quarks' May Lurk Inside Higgs Boson Particle
    Weird 'Techni-Quarks' May Lurk Inside Higgs Boson Particle Thu, Apr 3, 2014

    The Higgs boson — a particle thought to explain how other particles get their mass — is tiny, but it may not be the tiniest particle yet. Theories have long predicted the existence of even smaller particles that might make up the Higgs, and recent research suggests these pip-squeaks, dubbed techni-quarks, are likely lurking in the universe. However, it will take the upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) — the world's most powerful particle accelerator — or the next generation of colliders to spot these Higgs components, saidThomas Ryttov, a particle physicist at the University of Southern Denmark. "We have nailed it down to only a few theories that have the right properties and characteristics to explain the Higgs particle and the Higgs mechanism," Ryttov said. More »

  • Does Antimatter Fall Up or Down? New Device May Tell
    Does Antimatter Fall Up or Down? New Device May Tell Tue, Apr 1, 2014

    The mystery of whether antimatter falls up or down could be solved with a new experiment to weigh matter's odd cousin, researchers say. "Currently the production rate of anti-hydrogen at CERN is four atoms per hour, or an atom every 15 minutes," Müller said. More »

  • Gotta Catch 'Em All: Take the Pokémon Google Maps Challenge Today
    Gotta Catch 'Em All: Take the Pokémon Google Maps Challenge Today Tue, Apr 1, 2014

    Starting in Japan 19 hours ago, Google has launched an impressive April Fools' Day game that lets Google Maps users catch Pokémon hidden all over the world while using the app on the smartphone or tablet. To earn the great prestige of becoming a Pokémon Master, all you have to do is launch the Google Maps app on your iOS or Android device and tap the Search field at the top of the screen. A new option in blue called "Press start" will appear on the screen with a Poké Ball symbol next to it, and once you press it, Google Maps will take you on a dazzling adventure across the world to catch elusive wild Pokémon species. Our first stop was at the Pokémon Lab near the CERN research facility in Switzerland, where we caught a Metagross. More »

  • April Fools' Day: The best pranks from the papers and the web
    April Fools' Day: The best pranks from the papers and the web Tue, Apr 1, 2014

    Here’s a round-up of the best efforts from April Fools' Day 2014 More »

  • Google's Page says US online spying threatens democracy
    Google's Page says US online spying threatens democracy Thu, Mar 20, 2014

    Larry Page, Google co-founder and CEO, speaks during the Google I/O developers conference at the Moscone Center on May 15, 2013 in San Francisco, California More »

  • World Wide Web Celebrates 25 Years
    World Wide Web Celebrates 25 Years Wed, Mar 12, 2014

    The World Wide Web - which revolutionised how the world communicates - turns 25 today. It was on March 12, 1989 that Sir Tim Berners-Lee - working at the Swiss physics laboratory Cern - presented a technical paper with the blueprint for the web. Professor Fionn Murtagh, head of computer science at De Montfort University, said: "It changed the world, and all of this came from academia." A key feature of the web is that it works on various computer operating systems. More »

  • Web founder calls for Internet bill of rights
    Web founder calls for Internet bill of rights Wed, Mar 12, 2014

    A bill of rights should be created to govern the Internet in the wake of revelations about the depth of government surveillance, the inventor of the World Wide Web said on Wednesday. More »

  • Berners-Lee Calls for Internet Constitution to Address 'Insidious and Chilling …
    Berners-Lee Calls for Internet Constitution to Address 'Insidious and Chilling … Wed, Mar 12, 2014

    The man known as the father of the world wide web, Sir Tim Berners-Lee, has spoken on the 25th anniversary of the day the idea of his era-defining technology was first mooted, to call for a global constitution for the web. On 12 March 1989, Berners-Lee, then a computer scientist at CERN in Switzerland, submitted his paper called 'Information Management: A Proposal' to his boss, which would lead two years later to the launch of the world wide web. 25 years on and that technology has radically changed the way the world communicates, but now it is time for governments around the world to protect their citizens by drawing up a charter for the internet, according to Berners-Lee. "We need a global constitution – a bill of rights" Berners-Lee told the Guardian. More »

  • How the World Wide Web developed
    How the World Wide Web developed Wed, Mar 12, 2014

    Timeline: More »

  • What if web had stayed offline?
    What if web had stayed offline? Wed, Mar 12, 2014

    In an ordinary commuter town in an ordinary part of Britain in 2014, it is rush hour on a Monday morning. More »

  • Web access key, says Lane-Fox
    Web access key, says Lane-Fox Wed, Mar 12, 2014

    Access to the web and the issue of privacy online are problems that must be addressed by Parliament and the establishment, former UK Digital Champion Baroness Martha Lane Fox has said. More »

  • World wide web anniversary marked
    World wide web anniversary marked Sun, Mar 9, 2014

    The 25th anniversary of the w orld wide web will be celebrated around the globe this week. More »

  • World Wide Web turns 25 years old
    World Wide Web turns 25 years old Sun, Mar 9, 2014

    Two Cambodian Buddhist monks stand outside an early Internet cafe in Phnom Penh, in December, 2000 More »

  • Column: Unlike many of my peers, I was given the amazing opportunity to work …
    Column: Unlike many of my peers, I was given the amazing opportunity to work … Wed, Mar 5, 2014

    There is no public scientific institution its equal to CERN – yet young Irish people continue to be excluded from it, writes James Casey. More »

  • Appeal to find 1946 All Ireland medal stolen during ‘brutal’ tiger kidnappi …
    Appeal to find 1946 All Ireland medal stolen during ‘brutal’ tiger kidnappi … Wed, Mar 5, 2014

    Jimmy Heaney’s junior football medal was stolen by a gang who broke into a home and forced a woman to hand over jewellery from the family shop. More »

  • Staff injured as armed men hold up Dublin pharmacy
    Staff injured as armed men hold up Dublin pharmacy Wed, Mar 5, 2014

    Staff were closing up the pharmacy when they were approached by two men armed with handguns. More »

  • Story of the Biggest Experiment in History Caught on Film
    Story of the Biggest Experiment in History Caught on Film Tue, Mar 4, 2014

    On July 4, 2012, scientists around the world waited with bated breath for the announcement that the long-awaited Higgs boson particle had been discovered. The finding — the result of the biggest and most expensive experiment in history — was set to either confirm reigning models of particle physics, or reveal gaps in scientists' understanding of the universe. A new documentary follows six scientists during the launch of the machine that made the discovery possible, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a gigantic particle accelerator at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), in Switzerland, as they attempt to recreate the earliest moments of the universe. "I knew this big event was coming, and I wanted it recorded," said producer David Kaplan, a physicist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md. "I knew it was going to be extremely dramatic scientifically, and also emotionally, for all of my colleagues," Kaplan told Live Science. More »

  • Column: Is space exploration worth the money?
    Column: Is space exploration worth the money? Mon, Feb 24, 2014

    Might the money spent on space exploration by governments and scientific institutes be better used for “real world” problems? Conor Farrell takes a look. More »

  • Bragg welcomes Bowie intervention
    Bragg welcomes Bowie intervention Thu, Feb 20, 2014

    English singer Billy Bragg has welcomed David Bowie's intervention on Scottish independence, urging more people south of the border to enter the debate. More »

  • Higgs brands fame 'bit of nuisance'
    Higgs brands fame 'bit of nuisance' Mon, Feb 17, 2014

    God particle scientist Professor Peter Higgs, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics last year, has admitted that he finds his new-found fame "a bit of a nuisance". More »

  • Future Colliders May Dwarf Today's Largest Atom Smasher
    Future Colliders May Dwarf Today's Largest Atom Smasher Wed, Feb 12, 2014

    LONDON — So, physicists have found the Higgs boson. It took three years for the world's most powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), to spot the elusive Higgs boson particle, which is thought to explain how other particles get their mass. However, if scientists want to look for new physics discoveries beyond the Higgs boson, in the form of new exotic particles and interactions, even the Large Hadron Collider may not be enough, said Terry Wyatt, a physicist at the University of Manchester who works on the LHC's ATLAS detector, one of seven particle-detector experiments conducted at CERN.  Speaking at a conference on the Higgs boson here at the Royal Society in January, Wyatt outlined what kind of enormous science experiments would be needed to go beyond the science that the LHC may deliver. More »

  • Hark, Quarks! Strange Tiny Particles Loom Large in New Study Mon, Feb 10, 2014

    The most precise measurement yet of a fundamental property of quarks — one of the building blocks of matter — brings scientists closer to finding new exotic particles. At the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory, scientists fired a beam of electrons at an atom of deuterium, or heavy hydrogen, which consists of one proton and one neutron. They looked at the way the electrons scattered after hitting the nucleus of the atom, and used that pattern to find out more about quarks, which make up protons and neutrons. The experiment is similar to one done in the late 1970s, which helped confirm that the Standard Model successfully explained the behavior of tiny particles. More »

  • Thousands sign up for Higgs course
    Thousands sign up for Higgs course Mon, Feb 10, 2014

    More than 10,000 people have signed up for an online course to study the work of Nobel Prize-winning physicist Professor Peter Higgs. More »

  • Exotic Particles, Tiny Extra Dimensions May Await Discovery
    Exotic Particles, Tiny Extra Dimensions May Await Discovery Fri, Feb 7, 2014

    LONDON — Exotic particles never before detected and possibly teensy extra dimensions may be awaiting discovery, says a physicist, adding that those searching for such newbies should keep an open mind and consider all possibilities. Such particles are thought to fill gaps in, and extend, the reigning theory of particle physics, the Standard Model, said David Charlton of the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom, who is also a spokesperson of the ATLAS experiment at the world's biggest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and one of the experiments that pinpointed the Higgs boson particle thought to explain why other particles have mass. "The questions raised by the discovery of the Higgs boson suggest new physics, and new particles, may be near to hand, at the energies now — and soon — being probed at the LHC," he said. Such questions, he said, include: why is the Higgs boson so light; More »

  • CERN eyes new giant particle collider
    CERN eyes new giant particle collider Thu, Feb 6, 2014

    Europe's physics lab CERN said Thursday it was eyeing plans for a circular particle collider that would be seven times more powerful than the facility which discovered the famous "God particle." More »

  • Column: Ireland is excluded from some of the world’s most fascinating scientific …
    Column: Ireland is excluded from some of the world’s most fascinating scientific … Wed, Jan 29, 2014

    As a non-member of CERN, we are missing out on unique opportunities to collaborate with our European neighbours in cutting-edge work – as well as the revenue opportunities it brings. More »

  • Dark Matter Mystery Could Be Solved in Next 10 Years
    Dark Matter Mystery Could Be Solved in Next 10 Years Mon, Jan 27, 2014

    Dark matter — the mysterious stuff that is thought to make up most of the matter in the known universe — may reveal itself during the next decade, one prominent scientist predicts. When the moment comes, it will result in "a pivotal paradigm shift in physics," Gianfranco Bertone, a physicist with the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, said in a talk on dark matter research at a Royal Society Frontiers of Astronomy conference in London in November. The elusive substance may show itself as researchers set out to test "the existence of some of the most promising dark matter candidates, with a wide array of experiments, including the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and a new generation of astroparticle experiments underground and in space," Bertone said. So far, the only evidence of dark matter's existence comes from the gravitational effects it exerts on visible matter. More »

  • Squarks & Neutralinos Lurk in the Universe, Physicist Says
    Squarks & Neutralinos Lurk in the Universe, Physicist Says Fri, Jan 24, 2014

    LONDON — Squarks, selectrons and neutralinos may be lurking in the universe, say physicists who suggest supersymmetry — the idea that every known particle has a yet-to-be-discovered sister particle — is not dead, despite the lack of evidence found in its favor. The world's most powerful atom smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), has yet to find evidence of the existence of such sparticles (supersymmetric particles), though perhaps physicists are not interpreting the data in the right way, said particle theorist Ben Allanach of Cambridge University. Speaking here at the Royal Society conference "Before, behind and beyond the discovery of the Higgs Boson" on Tuesday (Jan. 21), Allanach proposed that the LHC might detect the elusive supersymmetric particles once it is up and running again next year with much higher energies. The first run of the LHC at 7 TeV culminated with the successful detection of what is widely believed to be the Higgs boson, a particle thought to explain how other particles get their mass. More »

  • Matter of Mystery: Antimatter Beam Could Help Solve Physics Puzzle
    Matter of Mystery: Antimatter Beam Could Help Solve Physics Puzzle Wed, Jan 22, 2014

    A new experiment at a Swiss physics laboratory has, for the first time, successfully produced a stream of antimatter hydrogen atoms that could help answer a fundamental physics question. The new achievement, which is detailed today (Jan. 21) in the journal Nature Communications, brings scientists a step closer to understanding why humans, stars and the universe are made of matter, rather than of its strange cousin, antimatter. "It's one of the fundamental questions of physics: We just don't know why we exist," said study co-author Stefan Ulmer, a physicist at science research institute RIKEN in Japan. When matter and antimatter collide, they annihilate and form energy. More »

  • Markets react positively to Ireland’s credit rating upgrade
    Markets react positively to Ireland’s credit rating upgrade Mon, Jan 20, 2014

    NTMA Chief Executive John Corrigan says it opens Ireland up to a ‘new universe’ of investors. More »

  • The 9 at 9: Monday
    The 9 at 9: Monday Mon, Jan 20, 2014

    Good morning! Here are nine things you need to know as you start your Monday… More »

  • Women encouraged to avail of free smear tests in 2014
    Women encouraged to avail of free smear tests in 2014 Sun, Jan 19, 2014

    European Cervical Cancer Prevention Week takes place from January 19 to 25. More »

  • HSE set to sanction hospitals in breach of junior doctor working hours dire …
    HSE set to sanction hospitals in breach of junior doctor working hours dire … Fri, Jan 17, 2014

    The IMO and HSE will meet at the end of this month to decide which hospitals should be sanctioned for failure to comply with the directive which put an end to 24 hour shifts. More »

  • You, Too, Can Smash Atoms!
    You, Too, Can Smash Atoms! Thu, Jan 16, 2014

    While most high-school students are stuck building science fair experiments with a funnel, some popsicle sticks or a few parts from Radio Shack, a few lucky ones will have the opportunity to take their science to a whole new level. CERN, the Geneva, Switzerland-based physics organization that runs the Large Hadron Collider that recently found the Higgs Boson, is opening up a particle beamline for students with the best research proposal. The beams accelerate protons and other particles to incredibly high speeds, and the focused beams are then fed to experiments such as the Large Hadron Collider, which smashes beams together to create tiny subatomic particles. The Proton Synchrotron beam line will be open to a total of nine teams of up to 30 students over age 16, along with one adult coach. More »