Clap for carers should stop before it becomes negative, says founder

Ryan Hooper, PA
  • s
    susan
    It should never had been started, or at the very most been one week only. It has become a psychological weapon to make us feel like one world together at home and condition us to a 'new' normality. It has created the type of scenario we all like to see in movies, you know, the villain, in this case Covid and the hero. We don't live in a movie, we live in the real world and NHS workers are no different from anybody else doing their jobs. Those in the front line, on the Covid wards and ICU are doing a tremendous job in difficult conditions and for those that have lost their lives it is tragic. However, on a daily basis, shop workers and others have put themselves at risk too; I wonder how many people lose their lives in the course of their work on an annual basis? People do, lorry drivers crash, roofers fall, factory workers get crushed, people still develop industrial diseases, and whilst measures are put into place and frequently tightened, deaths still occur. Do we, as a nation, clap for them, or cry for them, no we do not. In truth hospital bed occupancy was down approx 60% in April, and that includes critical care beds, April last year there was 95% occupancy, the majority of NHS staff have been under utilised, and as one doctor said 'twiddling their thumbs' with another saying he was 'bored'. The majority are no angels, no more than anyone else working with the public, in fact, just like the rest of the population, there are lazy ones, mean ones, nasty ones and uncaring ones. I worked for the NHS for many years and I've met them all.
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    Willie Osheq
    I refuse to join in with such antics. However in the background I applaud our NHS frontline workers, equally however I also applaud delivery drivers, shop workers, bin men, IT workers, utility company workers, media workers and the thousands of others that have kept this country running during hard times.
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    Michael
    I agree that everyone's doing a great job but that's just it, it's their job, I also agree that they should have better pay ,long before the current situation but being a resident in a large housing estate i have to say that the clap for appreciation has gotten out of control. We have several self proclaimed DJ'S blasting what they and a minority call music every Thursday evening for hours ,in the name of the NHS. I admire anyone who goes above and beyond for others, however, the definition of "hero", has been misconstrued. Instead of calling everyone who's actually just doing what they're paid for "heroes" , the campaign should highlight the injustices these workers are suffering in the course of their employment. Start clapping for better working conditions and to show disapproval of the conditions they're expected to work under. If the public would open their eyes and see the injustice instead of clapping like seals just because the media say's they should then maybe the powers that be would be shamed into improving the working conditions.
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    paul
    I'm a Frontline worker. I go to work, I come home. Same as I always have. My wife has the incredibly difficult task of entertaining and educating our son and hasn't gone anywhere for months now. I look up to her and many like her. The ”clap” is a bit cringy now
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    Gary
    Lot's of people clapping themselves. "Arn't I great". My neighbours clap but they also mingle with other families in the street. No social distancing. Time to get our priorities right!
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    Nicholas
    Finally someone calling for an end to the virtue signaling. I have loved a cherished the nhs WORKERS my whole life due to health issues and injuries. I told everyone i know weeks ago the nhs nurses that do most of the work need to not be cheated out of owed wages only to then see admin hired with the money they where owed. They NEED better pay not applause.
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    Ela8
    I agree that it should stop. It was a wonderful spontaneous reaction in the first few weeks, but now some people are feeling pressured to clap. In addition, there is growing hyprocrisy, with some people happily clapping whilst flouting the lockdown rules. Surely the ultimate way to support the NHS is just to stick to the rules. I think it's beginning to become a farce, where some people are happy to be seen to be supporting the NHS by clapping, whilst not bothering to stick to the rules in practice.
  • C
    Civil War
    If you clap for one you should clap for them all how about all our
    Armed Forces Guys Veterans Young and Old who fought for this country..
    Fire-Crews etc who save Lives.
    There needs to be a National Day of Remembrance for all the good members of the public in the U.K who have died from this virus also..
  • D
    David
    It was noticeable that fewer people went to their doors locally this week. We usually also have a loud firework set-off in the village and that didn't happen either. I do think people have got weary of the event. As far as Plas starting it I thought that it all began in Italy several weeks before it did here so it wasn't actually he idea in the first place?!.
  • J
    Just the Truth
    Turned into a parade for those who care little to convince others they care a lot.