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My co-worker stole my thunder on a project, should I tell my boss?

Curious businessman secretly looking at laptop screen of colleague, sneaking peek at other computer, stealing idea, copying private information on exam, nosy clerk spying on coworker at workplace
Curious businessman secretly looking at laptop screen of colleague, sneaking peek at other computer, stealing idea, copying private information on exam, nosy clerk spying on coworker at workplace

My co-worker and I worked on a project but I did most of the work. When we presented it to the team he put his name first on the title page and took over the presentation. My boss now thinks he led this project. That’s unfair and untrue. Should I say something to the boss and my co-worker?

What a jerk.

I guess you didn’t correct him in the meeting and just went with it, but you could have politely reminded him that you prepared who was going to cover what, to get it back on track.

If you don’t address it then you are only going to invite similar behavior going forward. At the very least ask your colleague to explain himself and explain that you will not let that happen again.

As for the boss, that’s a tricky matter. Depending on the relationship, you can share what happened. Otherwise, just make sure that you don’t let it happen again.

I’m a retired nurse collecting a pension. I was recently told I was being overpaid. They said I wouldn’t have to repay anything, but they would reduce my future payments, by a lot. I fought back and settled on $20 per month less. Can the health care company do this again? What are my rights?

When a pension plan realizes that it has been overpaying a retiree, it is typical to reduce their future monthly payments to the correct amount and then recover (or recoup) the amounts that have been overpaid. The plan may reduce the future monthly payments even more, or demand a lump-sum repayment, or both.

None of this is uncommon, but you do have rights. Ask the person running your plan to explain how the mistake happened. Ask to see the old and new calculation and compare that to the statement you received when you started collecting benefits.

Nearly 10 years ago, the IRS stopped requiring the repayment of pension overpayments, so this is negotiable. You can also file for a “hardship waiver” with the plan administrator.

Finally, there are lawyers who specialize in this area and retiree associations, such as AARP, who can direct you to someone who can help. Sounds like you have negotiated a good outcome for yourself, though. Well done.

Gregory Giangrande has over 25 years of experience as a chief human resources executive. Hear Greg Wed. at 9:35 a.m. on iHeartRadio 710 WOR with Len Berman and Michael Riedel. Email: GoToGreg@NYPost.com. Follow: GoToGreg.com and on Twitter: @GregGiangrande