Coffee logs which are better for the environment than wood go on sale

Helena Horton
Coffee logs are going on sale at Waitrose - Coffee Logs

Coffee logs which are better for the environment than wood are going on sale in supermarkets for the first time this week.

Each log is made from the grounds of approximately 25 cups of coffee, which come from coffee shops, offices, restaurants, instant coffee factories and even universities, airports and train stations around the UK.

The logs, which will be sold in Waitrose, smell slightly of coffee when not in use, but when they are burned they smell similar to wood.

They burn 20 per cent hotter and brighter than wood and emit  80 per cent less carbon than burning kiln-dried wood.

By burning waste coffee oil it also reduces the amount of coffee grounds go to landfill where they emit methane, a greenhouse gas 34 times more potent than carbon dioxide.

Jennifer Lovegrove, Partner & Assistant Buyer at Waitrose & Partners said: "When I heard of Coffee Logs, I instantly thought they would be a hit with our customers and am thrilled we’ll be stocking them from November."

"Reducing waste and finding ways to be kinder to the environment is a priority for our business, so this pioneering product fits perfectly with our plans for recycling and waste reduction."

Bio-bean, a clean technology company, came up with the idea for the new fuel six years ago, when it was noticed that cold coffee gathered a film of oil.

The supermarket has noticed that customers want zero-waste products after an "Unpacked" trial in Oxfordshire, during which they made an outlet plastic-free.

A spokesperson explained : "Of the hundreds of customers we've surveyed in our in-store research more than 90 per cent said they would continue to shop Unpacked.

"We continued the trial by introducing elements of the concepts to our Cheltenham shop in September, and we are introducing refillable zones at our Wallingford shop this Friday (8 Nov) and Abingdon (22 Nov)."

The supermarket has also begun selling beer made from leftover bread from brand Toast, and is supplying this in its refillable beer stations, where customers bring their own bottles to be filled with drink.