Cold snap will send UK temperatures tumbling

Nicola Slawson
Gardeners have been warned to be on the alert for ground frost. Photograph: Ben Birchall/PA

Don’t put away that winter coat just yet: Britain is braced for a late taste of winter, with icy showers and arctic winds expected across much of the country early next week.

The cold snap is likely to bring snow and sleet in Scotland and parts of England, the Met Office warned.

Forecasters have advised wrapping up, while drivers should watch out for frosty roads and gardeners are warned to be alert.

Temperatures are expected to take a dive from Monday, before starting to rise again later in the week.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, maximums will reach just 7C (45F) in the north of England and 11C in the south, with frost at night in some parts. The conditions are a far cry from the 25C reached in London just 10 days ago.

Temperatures in the Highlands of Scotland will plunge as low as -2C and bring icy gales and snow.

Marco Petagna, forecaster for the Met Office, said: “There’s a big change on the way. Certainly Tuesday and Wednesday nationwide look to be much colder days next week.

“Monday will be a transition day and we’ll start to see colder air pushing down across the north and then much colder across all areas the following two days. We’re going to see a northerly feed of air come across the UK, so the wind is swinging down from the Arctic.”

He added: “Winter coats shouldn’t be put away yet. It will feel really cold in the wind. It’s wise for people to tune in to the weather forecasts over the next few days. There may well be weather warnings for the snow and people should be prepared for slippery roads and obviously should allow for extra time on journeys.

“Gardeners should also beware as bedding and plants might be affected.”

One consolation: the cold snap won’t last long, Petagna said. “Temperatures will recover back towards average by the weekend, so it’s only a short-lived spell of cold weather. There will be widespread frost and sleet and snow showers in some places.”

By the May Day bank holiday, temperatures will be back to average for this time of year, but the north-west could see wet and windy weather.

By using Yahoo you agree that Yahoo and partners may use Cookies for personalisation and other purposes