Colorado AG: Probe finds Aurora Police racially biased

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·2-min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Racial Injustice Elijah McClain (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)
Racial Injustice Elijah McClain (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

Colorado’s attorney general said Wednesday that a civil rights investigation begun amid outrage over the death of Elijah McClain has found that the Aurora Police Department has pattern of racially biased policing.

Attorney General Phil Weiser's office investigation, announced in August 2020, was the first of its kind launched under a sweeping police accountability law passed in Colorado the month before amid protests over the killing of George Floyd It had begun several weeks before but was not revealed until the day that McClain’s parents filed a lawsuit against Aurora. The lawsuit alleges that police’s treatment of McClain, a 23-year-old massage therapist, was part of a pattern of racially biased policing that has involved aggression and violence against Black people.

The accountability law made it unlawful for police officers or other employees of government agencies to deprive people of their constitutional rights and gave the attorney general the power to enforce it. Under the law, if the attorney general finds an agency has “a pattern or practice” of violating people’s rights, the attorney general must notify the agency of the reasons for that belief and give it 60 days to make changes. If the agency does not make changes, the attorney general can file a lawsuit to force them.

Weiser’s office is also prosecuting three police officers and two paramedics on manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide and assault charges in McClain’s death. He convened a grand jury to decide whether to file criminal charges after being ordered to take another look at the case by Democratic Gov. Jared Polis amid last year’s protests.

The grand jury indicted all five.

Police stopped McClain as he walked home from the store on Aug. 24, 2019, after a 911 caller reported a man wearing a ski mask and waving his hands who seemed “sketchy.” Officers put McClain in a chokehold and pinned him down. Paramedics injected him with 500 milligrams of ketamine, an amount appropriate for someone 77 pounds (35 kilograms) heavier than McClain’s 143-pound (64-kilogram) frame, according to the indictment. He was later taken off life support.

The Aurora Police Department also faced criticism when officers put four Black girls on the ground last year and handcuffed two of them next to a car that police suspected was stolen but turned out not to be.

And an officer was charged with assault in July after being captured on body camera video pistol-whipping and choking a Black man during an arrest. Another officer was charged with not intervening as required under the new police accountability law.

Read More

McKayla Maroney reveals horror question from FBI about her abuse

Police will not launch criminal investigation into Martin Bashir’s Diana interview

Congress told to avoid ‘Justice for J6’ rally as organizers ban Trump gear

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting