Conspiracy theorists think ‘they’ are spraying the skies to stop us seeing ‘Planet X’

End of the world: Mysterious planet Nibiru ‘set to wipe out all life with apocalyptic earthquakes’

We’re living in a golden age of conspiracy theories, with YouTube, Twitter and Facebook a fertile birthing pool for some of the most barking mad nonsense ever created.

This week, we have a glorious hybrid of two long-running conspiracy favourites: chemtrails (you know, the mind-controlling chemicals ‘they’ are spraying on us), and the non-existent ‘death planet’ Nibiru.

Nibiru, in case you’ve forgotten, was predicted to destroy our planet last month, and in 2016, and in 2012, and on several other occasions.

To wit, conspiracy theorists claim that people are spraying mind-control chemicals into the sky, and projecting a fake moon up there, specifically to stop us seeing the mysterious (and non-existent) planet.

The SpaceX CEO thinks the truth is out there.

Around a third of Americans seriously entertain the idea that the bizarre conspiracy theory of ‘chemtrails’ is real, according to a new study by Harvard researchers.

The idea is laughably bonkers: those white lines which you see behind planes are in fact trails of mind-bending chemicals spreading across the sky.

In reality, they’re just water vapour – but try telling that to the tinfoil hat brigade.

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Matt Rogers, a YouTube conspiracy fan claims that there’s evidence in the clouds and the moon that we’re being lied to.

Pointing at lines in the sky, he says, ‘’All of these are caused by pilots, spraying our skies. They’re being used and controlled by the governments.’
‘It all comes down to a point of Nibiru.

‘They spray the skies at specific times of the day and times of the month, and the pattern of spraying is so blatantly obvious that they’re hiding something.

‘They’re doing it to hide the sun and moon. They’re also doing it at night time to hide the stars.

‘This is a big cover-up.’

Around a third of Americans seriously entertain the idea that the bizarre conspiracy theory of ‘chemtrails’ is real, according to a new study by Harvard researchers.

The idea is laughably bonkers: those white lines which you see behind planes are in fact trails of mind-bending chemicals spreading across the sky.

In reality, they’re just water vapour – but try telling that to the tinfoil hat brigade.

Nibiru (or Planet X) was widely predicted to hit our planet in December 2016, and before that in April 2016, and December 2015.

Prior to that, it was predicted to smash into our planet to coincide with the Mayan apocalypse in 2012 – and before that, Nancy Lieder, an American website writer who claimed to have an alien implant in her brain, predicted it would destroy the world in 2003.

Nigel Watson, author of the UFO Investigations Manual, says, ‘There have been lots of conspiracy theories surrounding the Moon, the best known is that the Apollo astronauts never went there and the landings were staged on Earth.

‘Another, lesser known theory is that the Moon is artificial, and is in fact an alien spaceship parked in our orbit. Now we get this idea that it is being projected to hide the mythical Planet X. Seems like such theorists just don’t want to accept a scientific viewpoint of the world, and believe any thing the ‘authorities’ say or do is part of a plan to hide the ‘truth’ about our ‘real’ existence.

‘The Moon has had a powerful influence on ancient folklore, beliefs and legends, and these conspiracy theories show  it still fuels our imagination in ways that attempt to cope with the strains of modern day existence.’

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