Cop26 news: ‘Time running out’ to reach deal, Sharma says as Britain snubs oil and gas pact

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·24-min read
Cop26 news: ‘Time running out’ to reach deal, Sharma says as Britain snubs oil and gas pact
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“Time is running out” to achieve success at the Cop26 summit in Glasgow, Alok Sharma has warned as the crucial climate talks draw to a close in Glasgow.

“There is still a lot more work to be done and Cop26 is scheduled to close at the end of tomorrow,” he said. “Time is running out.”

Mr Sharma urged all countries to “strain every sinew to achieve a timely outcome that we can all be proud of”, warning: “We still have a monumental challenge ahead of us.”

His comments came after the UK declined to join an international alliance aiming to end new oil and gas projects at Glasgow’s Cop26 summit.

The move has left a small group of other countries led by Costa Rica and Denmark to forge a path away from fossil fuels.

Campaigners have warned that if Boris Johnson allows fossil fuel extraction to continue on Britain’s watch he will lose credibility in the fight against global heating.

Meanwhile, the head of the UN has said the attempt to limit warming to 1.5C as agreed in Paris six years ago is “on life support”.

Antonio Guterres also said climate negotiators at Cop26 had failed to meet any of his organisation’s three goals. Talks are going down to the wire in the summit’s final hours after Mr Johnson admitted there remained “a huge amount” to do.

His warning came despite China and the US resolving to cooperate more closely on tackling the climate crisis.

Read More

Cop26: UK snubs pact to end oil and gas as small group of nations forge path away from fossil fuels

‘There is no other way to get this thing done’: US and China make pact to cooperate on climate crisis

Don’t be fooled by Cop26 climate boasts – emissions need cutting to zero, not net zero, to avoid catastrophe

Key points

  • US and China make pact to cooperate on climate crisis

  • PM accused of abandoning post by leaving Cop26 for London

  • Make sustainable food systems the centre of climate action, writes ex-UN chief

  • Goal of 1.5C maximum warming ‘on life support’, says UN chief

  • UK declines to join oil and gas alliance

  • Cop26 pledges ‘will have limited effect’ on emissions gap

‘There is no other way to get this thing done’: US and China make pact to cooperate on climate crisis

07:59 , Jon Sharman

The US and China have made a joint declaration at the Cop26 summit to accelerate measures in the 2020s to tackle the climate crisis, writes Louise Boyle.

The world’s two largest polluters have committed to a working group for this decade, saying they will “meet regularly” and focus on “concrete actions”.

A sudden announcement was made on the UN Cop26 website on Wednesday that there would back-to-back press conferences from the nations’ two longtime climate negotiators, Xie Zhenhua and John Kerry.

US and China make pact to cooperate on climate crisis

Watch live outside Cop26 venue in Glasgow

08:18 , Jon Sharman

PM accused of abandoning post by leaving Cop26 for London

08:28 , Jon Sharman

Boris Johnson was today under pressure to do more to secure a credible deal at the Cop26 climate change summit, after he admitted that with just 48 hours to go there was “a huge amount” to do to keep alive hopes of preventing disastrous global warming, writes Andrew Woodcock.

Paying a flying visit to the summit venue in Glasgow, the prime minister urged fellow world leaders to “pick up the phone” to their negotiating teams and give them a mandate to compromise to get a deal which would put the world on track for keeping warming within 1.5C above pre-industrial levels.

But he was accused of a “dereliction of duty” as he left the conference to return to London for a cabinet meeting on his “levelling up” agenda, rather than staying to lead the battle to toughen up a draft agreement which environmentalists warn lacks the necessary ambition.

Johnson under pressure after admitting ‘huge amount’ remains to make Cop26 a success

John Kerry says US will be coal free by 2030

08:47 , Jon Sharman

Biden administration climate envoy John Kerry said at the Cop26 UN climate conference that the US will phase out burning coal by the end of the decade, writes Oliver O’Connell.

Speaking to Bloomberg on Tuesday in Glasgow, Scotland, Mr Kerry said: “By 2030 in the United States, we won’t have any coal.”

He added: “We will not have coal plants.”

John Kerry says US will be coal free by 2030

Analysis: The good, the bad and the grey areas in the first draft of the Cop26 agreement

09:06 , Jon Sharman

The first iteration of the Cop26 agreements were published early on Wednesday, setting out a vision for how the world can keep hopes of limiting global heating to 1.5C above pre-industrial levels within reach.

The draft text offers a stark assessment of “alarm and concern” at where the world stands due to 1.1C of global heating, with climate impacts already being felt in every region of the world, write Louise Boyle and Daisy Dunne.

The good, the bad and the grey areas in the first draft of the Cop26 agreement

Editorial: The chances of success at Cop26 are diminishing – and Boris Johnson knows it

09:25 , Jon Sharman

The notion that the survival of life on Earth depends on Boris Johnson is not a comfortable one, and it might even frighten the prime minister himself.

The chances of success at Cop26 appear to be receding. The published draft agreement is underwhelming, fatally compromised by the reluctance of powers such as China, Russia, India and Saudi Arabia to do the right thing, as well as the likes of Toyota and Volkswagen declining to sign up to a truly ambitious vehicle electrification programme.

Editorial: The chances of success at Cop26 are diminishing – and Johnson knows it

Opinion: Greener and more sustainable food systems should be at the centre of climate action

09:44 , Jon Sharman

The 25,000 or so delegates gathered in Glasgow for Cop26 have a critical task – to discuss and agree on solutions to avert a climate catastrophe that could bring untold destruction to the world. As negotiations stretch into the nights and become heated, as they often do, the one thing they can count on is having climate-friendly and healthy meals, writes Ban Ki-Moon.

The organisers of Cop26 have ensured that 80 per cent of food served at the conference is seasonal and sourced in Scotland, such as the Mara Seaweed, which can grow without fertiliser, freshwater or soil, and carrots and potatoes stored using renewable energy. Many of my team members present at the conference have reported back on the good quality of food. There is also a concerted and commendable effort being made to reduce food waste.

Sustainable food systems should be at the centre of climate action | Ban Ki Moon

Alliance for ending oil and gas reliance

09:54 , Jon Sharman

Denmark and Costa Rica are set to announce a new alliance focused on ending the use of oil and gas today at Cop26.

The UK had initially said it wouldn’t join the group but Boris Johnson has suggested he may reconsider.

Elsewhere, Alok Sharma, Antonio Guterres, Nicola Sturgeon and Vanessa Nakate will speak at an event on the future of cities.

“With 68 per cent of the global population living in cities by 2050, it's vital we build a sustainable and resilient future,” Cop26 organisers said ahead of the event.

Cop26 overshadowed by grim progress report on carbon emissions

10:09 , Jon Sharman

#icymi

Johnson welcomes US-China pact that overshadowed his flying visit to Glasgow

10:24 , Jon Sharman

Boris Johnson has hailed the US-China pact announced last night as a “boost to negotiations” on tackling the climate crisis.

Sturgeon beefs up climate funding for poor countries

10:30 , Jon Sharman

Nicola Sturgeon has committed another £3m a year to the climate justice fund to help the world's poorest countries.

Scotland's first minister announced Holyrood would now spend £9m a year to help those countries adapt to and mitigate the climate crisis.

The Scottish contribution to the fund will account for 0.012% of the $100bn (£71.4bn) each year that rich nations pledged to poorer nations at the Cop summit in Copenhagen in 2009.

However, a report for the UN last year concluded that "the only realistic scenarios" show this promise is set to be broken.

Ms Sturgeon said: "Every vulnerable or developing country I have spoken with has big ambitions for meeting the climate crisis but they do not have the funding for adaptation, for mitigation, or for tackling the loss and damage that is needed to deliver.

"It is time for leaders of developed countries, large and small, to do what is needed to bridge the remaining gap, and put on the table now the money that is needed to make good on past commitments and unlock progress in other areas."

The SNP leader’s pledge takes Scotland’s contribution to £24m over the course of the parliamentary term and comes just two months after it announced it would be doubled to £6m.

Ask Me Anything: Caroline Lucas to answer your questions on the Cop26 climate summit in Glasgow

10:49 , Jon Sharman

This event is happening later today

It is week two of Cop26. While the first-week saw a flurry of new announcements, attention has now turned to the complex negotiations that underpin the UN climate summit, writes Daisy Dunne.

At the end of the day on Friday, nearly 200 countries are due to reach a consensus on a vast array of crucial issues, ranging from finalising the rulebook of the landmark Paris Agreement to agreeing on long-term finance plans for developing nations grappling with climate impacts.

Caroline Lucas is a Green Party MP who has twice led her party. She has been at Cop26 following the negotiations since the start and on Saturday joined climate protesters on the streets of Glasgow.

At 4pm GMT, she will join me to answer your questions on the Cop26 climate summit and what must happen to get the world on track to meeting its climate goals.

Take part below:

Ask Me Anything: Caroline Lucas answers your questions on the Cop26 climate summit

Glasgow summit’s carbon footprint expected to be double previous Cop's

11:08 , Jon Sharman

Cop26 is expected to have a carbon footprint twice as large as the previous summit on climate change, making it the most carbon-intensive summit of its kind, according to a report.

A preliminary report for the UK government by consultants Arup states 102,500 tonnes of CO2 equivalent (tCO2e) is due to be released by the summit in Glasgow.

Quoting the report, The Scotsman newspaper said about 60 per cent of this came from international flights.

Cop26 is nearing the end of its second full week in Glasgow, with more than 30,000 people expected to attend the conference.

Madrid hosted Cop25 in 2019, which produced 51,101 tCO2e.

The UK government said this year's summit was the largest climate change conference so far, and the Arup report includes emissions from both the blue and green zones.

PA Media

Don’t be fooled by Cop26 boasts – emissions need cutting to zero, not net zero to avoid a catastrophe

11:27 , Jon Sharman

There’s been a lot of self-congratulation at Cop26 as more countries commit to net zero emissions. The boast is that more than 80 per cent of the global economy is now covered by a national net zero target, writes Caroline Lucas.

But that little word “net” is having to do a huge amount of heavy lifting. At best, there’s too much reliance on it. At worst, it’s an accountancy trick giving people the impression of climate action when in reality it’s business-as-usual, with catastrophic consequences for people and planet.

Emissions need cutting to zero, not net zero to avoid a catastrophe | Caroline Lucas

Opinion: Climate justice means protecting the rights of indigenous peoples – they are the best stewards of their lands

11:46 , Jon Sharman

Traditional communities and indigenous peoples are fundamental agents in the fight against climate change, write Dinamam Afer Jurum Tuxa and Leila Saraiva.

Through the relationship they build with the land and the way they manage their territories, these communities are the most important and best guardians of forests and native vegetation all over the world.

In Brazil, for instance, in the region known as the Legal Amazon, the deforested area was 20 times lower within indigenous territories compared to non-indigenous ones, in 2020 alone.

Opinion: Climate justice means protecting the rights of indigenous peoples

Goal of 1.5C maximum warming ‘on life support’, says UN chief

12:05 , Jon Sharman

The goal of limiting global heating to 1.5C is “on life support” and negotiators at Cop26 have failed to hit any of the UN’s targets, according to the body’s secretary-general.

Antonio Guterres warned against reaching a final agreement just for the sake of it, if doing so fell short of the ambitions set for the Glasgow summit.

He told the Associated Press: “It is the moment to reach agreement by increasing ambition in all areas: mitigation, adaptation and finance in a balanced way.”

Talks are at a crucial moment, Mr Guterres added.

Meanwhile, Alok Sharma said “we are not there yet” on the crucial talks, particularly on financing.

Previously, Boris Johnson had warned there was a “huge amount” still to do as the final hours of Cop26 ticked away.

Read more below:

Johnson under pressure after admitting ‘huge amount’ remains to make Cop26 a success

Denmark and Costa Rica alliance

12:47 , Zoe Tidman

Denmark and Costa Rica have said they would announce a new alliance focused on ending the use of oil and gas.

Watch as it happens here:

UK declines to join oil and gas alliance

12:58 , Zoe Tidman

Cop26 host the UK has declined to join an international alliance aiming to end new oil and gas projects, leaving a small group of other countries led by Costa Rica and Denmark to forge a path away from fossil fuels.

Daisy Dunne our climate correspondent, has the full story:

UK snubs pact to end oil and gas as other nations forge path away from fossil fuels

Tuvalu investigating how to stay a country if it is submerged by rising sea levels

13:48 , Jon Sharman

Tuvalu is exploring ways to keep its recognition as a state even if it loses all its land to rising sea levels, writes Stuti Mishra.

Simon Kofe, the Pacific island nation’s foreign minister, said it was planning for the “worst case scenario” and looking into keeping the ownership of its maritime zones.

“We’re actually imagining a worst-case scenario where we are forced to relocate or our lands are submerged,” he told Reuters on Thursday.

Tuvalu investigating how to stay a country if it is submerged by rising sea levels

Alok Sharma sounding less than hopeful today

13:58 , Jon Sharman

There is still a lot more work to be done to secure agreement at the Cop26 climate summit, its president, Alok Sharma, has told delegates.

The penultimate day of the talks "must represent another gearshift" in negotiations, Mr Sharma has said, as countries try to resolve political differences in a number of areas that still need to be hammered out.

"I want to be clear, we are not there yet, there's still a lot more work to be done.

"I know how hard you are all working, but today must represent another gearshift where negotiators finalise outstanding technical work and ministers dial up their engagement," he said.

European nations push back against defining nuclear power as climate friendly

14:17 , Jon Sharman

A coalition of European countries have declared they cannot agree to defining nuclear power as a form of climate-friendly energy.

Austria, Denmark, Germany, Luxembourg and Portugal said reactors “cannot be a solution to the climate crisis”.

Svenja Schulze, Germany’s environment minister, argued nuclear power was too slow, dangerous and unsustainable.

The five countries said adding nuclear power to the EU-approved list of climate-friendly technologies risked diverting funds from renewable energies such as wind and solar power.

France and several other EU member nations have said they want to use nuclear energy as part of their efforts to phase out fossil fuel plants that are significant sources of greenhouse gas emissions.

Still time to complete Paris rulebook, EU says

14:39 , Matt Mathers

The rulebook for implementing the 2015 Paris climate agreement could still be completed at COP26 in Glasgow this week, European Union climate policy chief Frans Timmermans said on Thursday.

"I think we still could complete the Paris rulebook. It will allow us to start delivering on what was agreed six years ago in a way that is transparent for everyone and accountable for everyone," he told reporters.

Austria expecting more tough negotiations

14:50 , Matt Mathers

Austria’s environment minister says she’s preparing for another day or two of tough negotiations at the UN climate conference in Glasgow, that is officially scheduled to wrap up on Friday evening.

“We still have two intense days, and likely also at least one intense night, possibly two, ahead of us,” Leonore Gewessler told The Associated Press Thursday.

Negotiators from almost 200 countries are haggling over a series of agreements they hope will keep alive the chance to meet the 2015 Paris accord’s goals on global warming.

“We are now in the phase of the conference where many of the papers are already on the table as proposals, with a lot of different options that still need to be talked through,” said Gewessler.

Austria and its EU allies would be pushing for an “ambitious” agreement, she added. “A strong signal on protecting the climate has to be sent from Glasgow.”

Fossil fuel language must be in Cop26 agreements

15:11 , Matt Mathers

Language on phasing out subsidies for fossil fuels must remain in the final version of the Cop26 conclusions, EU climate policy chief Frans Timmermans said on Thursday.

"That has to be part of the conclusion here today," he told reporters, referring to language included in a first draft decision published on Wednesday. "Removing it would be an extremely, extremely bad signal."

‘Nothing has been achieved at summit'

15:33 , Matt Mathers

“Nothing has been achieved” at the Cop26 summit in Glasgow, an activist has claimed.

“There was fossil fuels in the text, there’s no fossil fuels in the text, said Saoi O’Connor, a prominent Irish campaigner who began the Fridays for Future strike in Cork back in 2019.

“Whether there is or not, it’s two words on a sheet of paper,” she adedd. “Where is the drastic change? The world keeps turning, nothing is different.”

O’Connor’s comments come after the US and China agreed on a pact to cooperate with each other on tackling climate change, a deal critics say doesn’t go far enough.

Watch: Cop26 President Alok Sharma addresses climate summit in Glasgow

15:39 , Matt Mathers

Sharma: ‘Time running out’ for Cop success

15:41 , Matt Mathers

“Time is running out” to achieve success at the Cop26 summit in Glasgow, Alok Sharma has said.

“There is still a lot more work to be done and Cop26 is scheduled to close at the end of tomorrow,” he said.

“Time is running out.”

Mr Sharma urged all countries to “strain every sinew to achieve a timely outcome that we can all be proud of”, warning: “We still have a monumental challenge ahead of us.”

Analysis: ‘Unexpected’ US-China climate pact brings badly needed optimism as Glasgow talks near end

15:45 , Matt Mathers

Climate cooperation between superpowers surprises observers, coming amid period of mounting hostility, writes our environment correspondent Harry Cockburn.

Read Harry’s full piece blow:

‘Unexpected’ US-China climate pact brings badly needed optimism to close of Cop26

Full report: Negotiators face ‘monumental challenge’ as summit runs out of time, says Sharma

16:07 , Matt Mathers

Our politics editor Andrew Woodcock has more on Sharma’s comments:

Cop26 faces ‘monumental challenge’ as summit running out of time, says Sharma

Governments cannot fight climate crisis alone, says UN climate chief

16:26 , Liam James

Patricia Espinosa, leader of a UN climate body, said the transition to sustainability cannot be affected solely by governments and requires action at different levels of society.

Ms Espinosa, the UNFCCC executive secretary, said: “Glasgow can be the starting point of a new, more prosperous era, a greener, more resilient and sustainable future. One that is just and more prosperous for all people.

“The transition, however, cannot be driven by governments alone. Inclusive multilateralism brings together party and non-party stakeholders, including cities, sub-national regions, businesses, investors and civil society.”

‘Pick up the pace’ in climate fight, urges UN’s Guterres

16:42 , Liam James

Antonio Guterres, secretary-general of the UN, urged governments to “pick up the pace” and show ambition in tackling the climate crisis.

He said in a speech at Cop26: “We cannot settle for the lowest common denominator.”

“Promises ring hollow when the fossil fuels industry still receives trillions in subsidies, as measured by the IMF.

“Or when countries are still building coal plants.

“Or when carbon is still without a price - distorting markets and investors decisions.

“Every country, every city, every company, every financial institution, must radically, credibly and verifiably reduce their emissions and decarbonise their portfolios starting now.”

Sturgeon urges rich countries to pledge more climate funding

16:57 , Liam James

Nicola Sturgeon said Scotland’s additional £3m a year commitment [see 10:30 post] to the climate justice fund was a challenge to other rich nations to follow suit.

The first minister said rich countries had benefited for generations from the emissions that are having a harsher impact on many poor countries around the world, which the climate justice fund seeks to help.

Wealthy countries agreed in 2009 to pay $100bn (£75bn) a year by 2020 to help poorer countries mitigate the effects of climate change, but it is thought the target will not be met until it is well overdue.

Ms Sturgeon told the Cop26 conference: “There are many things that Glasgow has to achieve and I hope we will see them achieved over the next 40 hours or so.

“But one relatively straightforward thing which should be achieved - and there is no excuse for not achieving - is meeting that 100 billion dollar commitment.

“It was made 12 years ago - it will be shameful if we come out of this Cop without that commitment being met.”

Sustainable food systems should be at the centre of climate action

17:17 , Liam James

The organisers of Cop26 have ensured that 80 per cent of food served at the conference is seasonal and sourced in Scotland, such as Mara seaweed, which can grow without fertiliser, fresh water or soil, and carrots and potatoes stored using renewable energy, writes Ban Ki-moon.

Many of my team members present at the conference have reported back on the good quality of food. There is also a concerted and commendable effort being made to reduce food waste.

This is a perfect example of how food and farming are both a driver of and a solution to the climate crisis. Unless we change how we currently produce, process, transport, consume and discard food, we will not make any headway on climate change mitigation and adaptation, the defining issue of our time.

Sustainable food systems should be at the centre of climate action | Ban Ki moon

Activists ‘greenwash’ Scottish Power building

17:45 , Liam James

Climate activists threw green paint over the Scottish Power building in Glasgow in protest against “greenwashing” by the energy company.

The group of Scientist Rebellion protesters also pasted posters displaying global heating projections on the walls of the building.

One of the group, Sue Lewis, said the protest was held on Remembrance Day because “as well as remembering all the people who have died in our conflict in the past, we also wanted to remember the people who have died from the climate crisis already, and also the many thousands who will die in the future, especially if this process at Cop26 does not succeed in improving the future for humanity.”

A protester is removed and arrested by police outside the Scottish Power building (PA)
A protester is removed and arrested by police outside the Scottish Power building (PA)
Poster displays IPCC projections for future global heating under different levels of pollution (PA)
Poster displays IPCC projections for future global heating under different levels of pollution (PA)

Don’t be fooled by Cop26 climate boasts – emissions need cutting to zero, not net zero, to avoid catastrophe

18:06 , Liam James

There’s been a lot of self-congratulation at Cop26 as more countries commit to net zero emissions, writes Caroline Lucas.

The boast is that more than 80 per cent of the global economy is now covered by a national net zero target.

But that little word “net” is having to do an awful lot of heavy lifting. At best, there’s too much reliance on it.

At worst, it’s an accountancy trick giving people the impression of climate action when in reality it’s business as usual, with catastrophic consequences for people and planet.

Emissions need cutting to zero, not net zero, to avoid catastrophe | Caroline Lucas

Now clear Cop26 won’t deliver ‘everything we hoped’, says Miliband

18:30 , Liam James

It has become clear that Cop26 will not deliver “everything we hoped” on climate change, Ed Miliband has said.

The shadow energy secretary said the focus should now be on salvaging what was possible in the final days of the conference and setting clear expectations for next year’s Cop27, which will be hosted by Egypt.

Mr Miliband said the world was “a long, long way away” from halving global emissions this decade.

Alok Sharma, Cop26 president, earlier said “time is running out,” and urged countries to work towards “an outcome we can all be proud of”.

Inside Cop26, things are turning a little surreal

18:59 , Liam James

Louise Boyle, The Independent’s Senior Climate Correspondent, reports from Glasgow:

Inside the cavernous halls of the Scottish Event Campus, the atmosphere is buzzy and purposeful. Teams of negotiators flow past on their way to meetings from early morning until late at night, dozens of languages crisscrossing at once. In a side hall, countries have pitched booths where event after event is held with people putting forward plans and ideas about how to adapt to and cope with our rapidly heating planet.

World leaders are ten-a-penny. John Kerry seems to be doing laps of the place. A murmur ripples through crowds when a famous (masked) face passes, usually conspicuous due to fast-moving security details. “Was that…?” is a common refrain. And no one received a reception like Barack Obama (even Leo). As the former US president made his way up a staircase at the Cop venue earlier this week, cheers went up from the hundreds of people gathered for a glimpse.

In the media center, at the far end of the venue, rows of journalists clatter on laptops in breezy, stark white tents, perched on Ikea-esque furniture under neon lights. I’ve had five seven cans of Irn-Bru, at last count (but I’m taking heart in how Scotland’s ginger nectar has gained international fandom via one AOC). I’ve eaten nothing but sandwiches for days. Thankfully, they are intermittently giving out free Tunnock’s teacakes at the entrance.

Inside Cop26, things are turning a little surreal

Climate Action Tracker: Cop26 pledges fall far short of closing emissions gap

19:44 , Liam James

Pledges on coal, cars, forests and methane at Cop26 only have a limited impact on delivering what is needed to avoid dangerous warming, analysis suggests.

Scientists warn that the world must cut emissions by 45 per cent by 2030 as part of efforts to keep global warming to 1.5C.

But plans for cutting emissions over the next decade do not meet this target, leaving a huge gap.

The deals agreed at Cop26 could cut emissions by around 2.2 billion tonnes according to analysis by Climate Action Tracker.

This would close the gap between 2030 emissions and what is needed to limit dangerous warming by just 9 per cent, the analysis found.

Egypt will host next Cop

20:20 , Liam James

Egypt will host the Cop27 next year, it was decided in Glasgow.

The conference will be held in the Red Sea resort of Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt’s environment ministry said.

President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi said in September that he wanted to host the conference and make it “a radical turning point in international climate efforts in coordination with all parties, for the benefit of Africa and the entire world.”

It was also decided that the UAE will host Cop28 in 2023.

Boris Johnson’s hopes of breakthrough climate deal slipping away

20:45 , Liam James

Hopes of keeping alive the chance of limiting global warming to 1.5C were tonight slipping through Boris Johnson’s fingers, as the Cop26 climate summit enters its final day without agreement on key issues - and with negotiations believed to be going backwards on a crucial fossil fuel pledge, writes Andrew Woodcock.

United Nations secretary general Antonio Gutteres warned that the 1.5C threshold, which is seen as a maximum limit to avoid the most catastrophic consequences of climate change, is “on life support”.

And the UK’s Cop26 president Alok Sharma said that negotiators faced a “monumental challenge” to reach a credible conclusion to the two-week summit, which was billed as humanity’s last chance to stave off the threat of devastating climate change.

Negotiators were working until late on Thursday on a new draft agreement, expected to appear early on the final scheduled day of the summit.

Johnson’s hopes of breakthrough climate deal slipping away as Cop26 enters final day

21:14 , Liam James

That’s all from our live coverage of the Cop26 conference for today. Thanks for following and be sure to check back tomorrow for the final day of talks.

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