Coronavirus: Queen shares special messages with Commonwealth nations

Rebecca Taylor
Royal Correspondent
Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Phillip on tour in Australia in 2006. (Getty Images)

The Queen has shared special messages with some Commonwealth nations as they battle the coronavirus pandemic.

The monarch gave a rare address on Sunday evening, which was to the UK and to the Commonwealth, but she followed it up with additional messages to the Commonwealth nations.

The Queen is particularly passionate about the 54 Commonwealth nations and keeps abreast of developments in all of them on a regular basis.

Here are some of her messages to her Commonwealth.

Canada

The Queen’s message said: “As the people of Canada experience profound and rapid changes to their lives, we are all concerned about the future. It may be difficult to remain hopeful when faced with loss and uncertainty, but Canadians have many reasons for optimism, even in the most trying times.

OQueen Elizabeth II is greeted by members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police musical ride in Ottawa in 2002. (Getty Images)

“Across Canada, countless people continue to care for the most vulnerable and to provide essential services for their fellow citizens. I am thankful for their dedication and for the hope it offers.

“In the coming weeks and months, the people of Canada will need to continue to work together to ensure the health and vitality of our communities. I know that Canadians will remain optimistic and will rise to the challenges ahead.

“My thoughts and prayers are with the people of Canada at this time.”

Read more: Queen's historic coronavirus speech prompts outpouring of praise for monarch

Julie Payette, the governor general of Canada, responded by saying: “One cannot choose when hardship comes, but one can choose how to respond to it in times of crisis. Canadians are grateful for the incredible dedication and care Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II continues to show to all. Like many around the world, we listened to her inspiring words as she addressed the nation about the coronavirus outbreak.”

Australia

The Queen’s message said: “At a time when people across the Commonwealth are experiencing a profound and rapid change to their lives, the pain of lost loved ones, and an understandable concern about the future, my thoughts are with all Australians.

“While it can be difficult to remain hopeful in such challenging times, especially following the summer's devastating bushfires and recent flooding, I am confident that the stoic and resilient nature of the Australian people will rise to the challenge.

“I extend my sincere admiration to the many Australians who work tirelessly to help those affected, provide essential services for their fellow citizens and continue to care for the most vulnerable.

Read more: Queen's message: Four other times the Queen gave a special address

Queen Elizabeth II tours the grounds of Admiralty House in 2006 in Sydney, Australia. (Getty Images)

“You will remain in my prayers in the coming months, with the resolute knowledge that with hard work, faith and unity, we will rise to the challenges ahead and ensure the health and vitality of all Australia's communities.”

The message was sent to the people of Australia via the governor-general David Hurley.

The messages came after her televised address to the UK and the Commonwealth, which was broadcast across several networks on Sunday evening.

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In it, she said: “The moments when the United Kingdom has come together to applaud its care and essential workers will be remembered as an expression of our national spirit; and its symbol will be the rainbows drawn by children.

“Across the Commonwealth and around the world, we have seen heart-warming stories of people coming together to help others, be it through delivering food parcels and medicines, checking on neighbours, or converting businesses to help the relief effort.

“And though self-isolating may at times be hard, many people of all faiths, and of none, are discovering that it presents an opportunity to slow down, pause and reflect, in prayer or meditation.”