Coronavirus vaccine: Oxford jab provides ‘strong’ immune response, analysis finds

Samuel Osborne
·2-min read
 (Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

AstraZeneca's Oxford coronavirus vaccine accurately follows its preprogrammed genetic instructions to successfully provoke a strong immune response, an analysis has found.

The vaccine “is doing everything we expected and that is only good news in our fight against the illness,” said David Matthews, an expert in virology from Bristol University, which led the research.

AstraZeneca, which is developing the vaccine alongside Oxford University researchers, is considered a frontrunner in the race to produce a vaccine against Covid-19.

The first data from late-stage large-scale clinical trials being conducted in several countries around the world, including Brazil, the United States and Britain, are expected to be released before the end of the year.

The vaccine - known either as ChAdOx1 or AZD1222 - is made by taking a common cold virus called an adenovirus from chimpanzees and deleting about 20 per cent of the virus’€™s instructions. This means it is impossible for the vaccine to replicate or cause disease in humans.

The Bristol researchers’€™ focus was to assess how often and how accurately the vaccine is copying and using the genetic instructions programmed into it by its designers. These instructions detail how to make the spike protein from the coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, that causes Covid-19.

Once the spike protein is made, the immune system reacts to it, training the immune system to identify a real Covid-19 infection.

"This is an important study as we are able to confirm that the genetic instructions underpinning this vaccine ... are correctly followed when they get into a human cell," Matthews said in a statement about the work.

His team's research was not peer reviewed by other scientists, but was published as a preprint before review.

Sarah Gilbert, professor of vaccinology at the University of Oxford and lead on the Oxford vaccine trial, added: “This is a wonderful example of cross-disciplinary collaboration, using new technology to examine exactly what the vaccine does when it gets inside a human cell.

"The study confirms that large amounts of the coronavirus spike protein are produced with great accuracy, and this goes a long way to explaining the success of the vaccine in inducing a strong immune response.”

Additional reporting by Reuters

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