Corrections and clarifications

Corrections and clarifications column editor

• In the Blind Date column in last Saturday’s Weekend magazine (page 41), the photograph we used for Karen, who went on a date with Damola, was actually of another woman. The picture has been replaced with the correct one in the online version of the article at gu.com/p/6veqn. Apologies to all concerned.

• A piece introducing the first part of our two-part special supplement on the 1930s said “the Labour prime minister Ramsay MacDonald refused to accept the [hunger] marchers’ petitions” (Welcome to the 1930s, 4 March, page 3). A reader points out that MacDonald’s most well-known refusal of a petition from hunger marchers was in 1932, when he was still prime minister but no longer a Labour one, having been expelled from the party in 1931.

• A feature in last Saturday’s Cook section (Go forth and multiply, 4 March, page 8) said that since the mid-1980s, Japanese children have been advised to eat 30 different foodstuffs a day. While that was the advice given back then, Japanese dietary guidelines changed in the early 2000s to shift the focus from a specific number of ingredients to a more general idea of balanced eating.

• An article reporting on air pollution data from the World Health Organization, specifically levels of ultra-fine particles of less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5s), included in a table headed “10 worst in the United States and Canada” the city of Courtenay, Canada, with a figure of 17 micrograms per cubic metre. That was the figure recorded in the WHO database for the PM2.5 annual mean in Courtenay in 2013, but the WHO now says it was incorrect and that the correct 2013 figure is 11 micrograms per cubic metre. That figure places Courtenay outside the top 10, and the table has been corrected (Pant by numbers: the cities with the most dangerous air – listed, 13 February, theguardian.com).

• We erred in converting a temperature rise of 2C to 35.6F (Arctic sea ice could disappear even if world achieves climate target, 6 March, theguardian.com). A temperature of 2C is equivalent to 35.6F, but a temperature rise of 2C is equivalent to a rise of 3.6F.

• Other recently corrected articles include:

Jeff Koons plagiarised French photographer for Naked sculpture

British people unaware of pollution levels in the air they breathe – study

Jack Thorne’s Junkyard: how I turned an adventure playground into a musical

Philip Hammond’s budget – our writers give their views

Amber Rudd asked to reveal where secret £1bn conflict fund is spent

Nazi art theft: Germany helps Jewish collector’s heirs hunt stolen works

Red squirrels: 5,000 volunteers sought to save species – and help kill invasive greys

May’s speech shows how little Scotland means in her dangerous game of Brexit

Northern Ireland election: DUP’s Arlene Foster ‘to stay as first minister’

Dutch elections: all you need to know

Trump hails ‘new chapter in American greatness’ in Congress speech

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