Crazy Rich Asians' Constance Wu says she attempted suicide after backlash

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·3-min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Photo credit: Getty Images
Photo credit: Getty Images

Note: The following article contains discussion of themes including suicide that some readers may find upsetting.

Crazy Rich Asians star Constance Wu has opened up about her mental health and attempted suicide following online backlash.

She returned to social media on Thursday (July 14) to reveal that she had attempted suicide following the 2019 Fresh Off The Boat controversy where she posted a number of tweets about the show's renewal.

She later clarified her comments by explaining that the renewal meant she had to give up another project she was passionate about, adding that she loves the series and its cast and crew. Following this, the show announced that Wu's role would not be recast.

In a Twitter post this week she explained her mental health journey over the past few years: "I haven't been on social media in almost three years. To be honest, I'm a little scared, but I'm dipping my toe back in to say I'm here and while I was gone I wrote a book called Making a Scene. This next part is hard to talk about... but I was afraid of coming back on social media because I almost lost my life from it.

"Three years ago, when I made careless tweets about the renewal of my TV show, it ignited outrage and internet shaming that got pretty severe," she continued. "I felt awful about what I'd said, and when a few DMs from a fellow Asian actress told me I'd become a blight on the Asian American community, I started feeling like I didn't even deserve to live anymore.

"Looking back, it's surreal that a few DMs convinced me to end my own life, but that's what happened."

She then revealed that she took time away from filming to focus on herself and explained why she chose to open up about the experience in her book, to help generate conversation and support within the Asian American community.

"It was a scary moment that made me reassess a lot in my life. For the next few years, I put my career aside to focus on my mental health. Asian Americans don't talk about mental health enough. While we're quick to celebrate representation wins, there's a lot of avoidance around the more uncomfortable issues within our community.

Photo credit: Getty Images
Photo credit: Getty Images

Related: Crazy Rich Asians 2 gets new update

"It also made me realize how important it is to reach out and care for people who are going through a hard time. That's why I wrote my book and why I'm here today – to reach out and help people talk about the uncomfortable stuff in order to understand it, reckon with it, and open pathways to healing.

"After a little break from Hollywood and a lot of therapy, I feel OK enough to venture back on here (at least for a little bit). And even though I'm scared, I've decided that I owe it to the me-of-3-years-ago to be brave and share my story so that it might help someone with theirs."

We would encourage anyone who identifies with the topics raised in this article to reach out. Organisations who can offer support include Samaritans on 116 123 (www.samaritans.org) or Mind on 0300 123 3393 (www.mind.org.uk). Readers in the US are encouraged to visit mentalhealth.gov or the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

You Might Also Like

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting