Cuomo calls NYC migrant crisis a ‘government blunder’ as he targets fellow Dems Hochul, Biden

Former Gov. Andrew Cuomo called the country’s migrant crisis a “government blunder” Sunday, taking aim at fellow Dems Gov. Hochul and President Biden during a speech at a Bronx church.

The 66-year-old scandal-scarred ex-gov — continuing his tiptoe back into the public spotlight two and a half years after resigning during a sex-harassment scandal — told congregants at the Grove Missionary Baptist Church it is wrong for New York City to have to shoulder the whole flood of migrants into the state because Albany politicians “don’t want the problem in the rest of” New York.

“New York state says the migrants can only go to New York City, not the Hudson Valley, not upstate New York, not Long Island — only New York City,” Cuomo said.

Former Gov. Andrew Cuomo poses with a supporter in front of the Missionary Baptist Church at 1488 Hoe Ave. in the Bronx on Sunday. TOMAS E. GASTON
Former Gov. Andrew Cuomo poses with a supporter in front of the Missionary Baptist Church at 1488 Hoe Ave. in the Bronx on Sunday. TOMAS E. GASTON
The scandal-scarred gov received a warm welcome from the Bronx church. TOMAS E. GASTON
The scandal-scarred gov received a warm welcome from the Bronx church. TOMAS E. GASTON

“Now New York City has over 100,000 migrants who have come to the city. New York City has to provide the housing and the education and the medical care. It makes no sense.

“And then the check comes. You know, when you are in the restaurant, and then the check comes, and nobody moves, everybody just looks at it, everybody puts their hands in their pocket. [New York City] Mayor [Eric] Adams says, ‘Federal government, you should pick up the tab, you started this,’ the federal government says, ‘I left my wallet at home.’ “

Cuomo said the added costs to the city to assist migrants, the fact that the Big Apple has the highest taxes in the country, the upcoming new congestion toll to get into Midtown and continuing local struggles with crime and homelessness has made the situation “unsustainable.”

He warned that more people will leave the state and city and also said it’s ridiculous that many migrants can’t easily get papers to work.

But the ex-governor, citing Scripture, said the state must also show compassion, opining that it is “demeaning” for migrants to be housed at Brooklyn’s remote Floyd Bennet Field, which he called a “wind tunnel.

“Forget how they got here. They are here. They are in our house. They are human beings. They deserve to be treated with dignity and respect,” he said.

Cuomo’s appearance came as he is said to be weighing a political comeback. TOMAS E. GASTON
Cuomo’s appearance came as he is said to be weighing a political comeback. TOMAS E. GASTON

The speech — which came as budget talks are heating up in Albany — was the latest in a string of appearances at black city churches for Cuomo, who considers their congregants a friendly constituency as he weighs a possible political comeback.

Sunday’s church-goers were overwhelmingly supportive of Cuomo’s speech — and everyone who spoke with The Post said they wanted him back in office.

“I like him, even though he has his ups and downs,” said Lucious Peterson, 64.

“I think he should run again. I like his spirit,” Peterson said. “If he gets back in there, it would be a big difference. I told him to run.”

Congregation members Melinda Vaughn, 70, and Lisa Washington agreed.

“I love him. It was a great speech. I feel like he is right,” Vaughn said. “Our voices do need to be heard, especially about this bit [the migrant crisis]. Federal government needs to pay their share.”

Washington added, “It was a beautiful speech.

“He has been working for a long time for the city, and he helped so many people. He needs to get back in office.”

Stephanie Tribble said she believes that Cuomo was “treated unfairly” over the allegations of sexual harassment that led to his stunning fall from power.

“I support everything he said, I love him,” Tribble said.

“When you are moving up in life, there are people that will fight with you, and there people that will fight against you.”

Cuomo continues to deny that he engaged in sexual misconduct or harassment against female staffers and other women, despite his resignation from office.