Cyclists outnumbering motorists in City of London during peak times, report reveals

Cyclists pass through an almost-deserted Bank junction in the heart of the City of London on January 4, 2021  (PA)
Cyclists pass through an almost-deserted Bank junction in the heart of the City of London on January 4, 2021 (PA)

There are more cyclists than motorists in the City of London during peak times, a new report reveals.

A report prepared for the City of London Corporation’s Planning and Transportation Committee found cyclists are the “single largest vehicular mode counted during peak times on City streets”.

The evidence was gathered from the most recent traffic survey, which was carried out last November 23, and found the number of motor vehicles was around 80% of pre-pandemic levels with pedestrian numbers at 63% while cycling was at 102%.

Researchers found that cyclists counted for 40% of road traffic in the city at peak times and more than a quarter (27%) throughout the rest of the day.

Danny Williams, the CEO of Active Travel England, said the results were “astonishing”.

The survey showed that while the number of motorists had fallen by 64% since 1999, the number of cyclists has increased by 386% in the same time.

It said: “Long-term trends observed from count data taken from 12 sites across the City since 1999 show motor vehicle volumes continuing to decline and cycle volumes continuing to increase.”

The report comes shortly after hundreds of cyclists demonstrated for cycling to be made safer for women in London.

Members of the London Cycling Campaign (PA Wire)
Members of the London Cycling Campaign (PA Wire)

Cyclists did laps of central London – starting and ending at Marble Arch and taking in Buckingham Palace, Whitehall and Trafalgar Square - in the ride organised by the London Cycling Campaign’s (LCC) Women’s Network.

Less than a third of London’s cycle trips are by women, despite being 51% of the population, according to LCC.

Fear of motor traffic due to inadequate cycle infrastructure, abuse and violence, and a lack of safe cycle networks for local journeys are some of the main barriers stopping women from going on a ride.

Eilidh Murray, of the LCC Women’s Network steering group, said: “As women from a range of backgrounds, we know being able to travel cheaply and independently by bike can bring us confidence, health and freedom. But we’re being put off cycling by a lack of safe routes, dangerous driving, harassment and more. “