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Hot Weather Dogs 2023: These are the 10 breeds of adorable dog that thrive in warm climates - including the loving Chihuahua 🐶

Some dog breeds are better suited to hot climates than others. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)
Some dog breeds are better suited to hot climates than others. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)

A huge number of us decided to welcome new puppies into our homes in the last two years – according to Kennel Club figures dog ownership soared – and post-lockdown demand for four-legged friends remains high.

There are a whopping 221 different breeds of pedigree dog to choose from, alongside numerous crossbreeds, so there’s plenty of thinking to do before you select your family’s latest addition.

There’s even academic guidance to seek out, with Psychologist Stanley Coren’s book ‘The Intelligence of Dogs’ ranking breeds by instincts, obedience, and the ability to adapt.

Considering that it's been bred to work under the demanding conditions of the Australian Outback, it's perhaps no surprise that the Australian Cattle Dog copes well in sweltering conditions. They have a short double coat that actually serves a dual function - keeping them both cool in the day and warm when temperatures plummet at night. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)

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One thing to take into consideration is that some dogs are predisposed to cope with – or even enjoy – living in a warm climate.

Another dog named after its desert-rich country of origin, the Afghan Hound may look like it has plenty of warm hair, but it's a single coat so is well ventilated and able to cope with extremes of temperature. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)
Another dog named after its desert-rich country of origin, the Afghan Hound may look like it has plenty of warm hair, but it's a single coat so is well ventilated and able to cope with extremes of temperature. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)

These breeds will think nothing of long walks in the summer, so if you have an ourdoorsy lifestyle and live in warm climes they are the pups that should feature high up on your canine wish list.

Here are the 10 breeds of dog that thrive in warm conditions.

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With barely an ounce of fat and a wafter-thin coat, the Italian Greyhound (and the larger Greyhound for that matter) are precision-tooled for high temperatures.
With barely an ounce of fat and a wafter-thin coat, the Italian Greyhound (and the larger Greyhound for that matter) are precision-tooled for high temperatures.

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The rare (in the UK at least) Ibizan Hound was bred in the sunny Balearics from dogs that previously lived in the sweltering deserts of Egypt. Wherever they may live today, this is a breed that retains a love of warm temperatures and don't get on well with chilly temperatures.
The rare (in the UK at least) Ibizan Hound was bred in the sunny Balearics from dogs that previously lived in the sweltering deserts of Egypt. Wherever they may live today, this is a breed that retains a love of warm temperatures and don't get on well with chilly temperatures.

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The tiny Chihuahua is a tiny dog with a very thin coat - perfect for the deserts of Mexico where they come from, but less good for chilly winters. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)
The tiny Chihuahua is a tiny dog with a very thin coat - perfect for the deserts of Mexico where they come from, but less good for chilly winters. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)
Not having much hair is a positive attribute in sweltering weather - and no dog has less fur than the Chinese Crested. In fact the main thing to watch out for with this breed is sunburn - best get the lotion out during the summer. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)
Not having much hair is a positive attribute in sweltering weather - and no dog has less fur than the Chinese Crested. In fact the main thing to watch out for with this breed is sunburn - best get the lotion out during the summer. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)
The Airedale Terrier's fuzzy tresses are surprisingly good at allowing heat to escape during warm weather. The fact that they lack an undercoat of any kind is also great for efficient temperature control. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)
The Airedale Terrier's fuzzy tresses are surprisingly good at allowing heat to escape during warm weather. The fact that they lack an undercoat of any kind is also great for efficient temperature control. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)
It may come from the less-than-warm north of England, but the long coat of the Yorkshire Terrier is so fine that it doesn't trap heat, making it the terrier best suited to spending long periods in the sun. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)
It may come from the less-than-warm north of England, but the long coat of the Yorkshire Terrier is so fine that it doesn't trap heat, making it the terrier best suited to spending long periods in the sun. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)
The Great Dane is one of the few large breeds to genuinely thrive in warm weather. Their innate laziness certainly helps - they are likely to just sleep through heatwaves. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)
The Great Dane is one of the few large breeds to genuinely thrive in warm weather. Their innate laziness certainly helps - they are likely to just sleep through heatwaves. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)
Most dogs that have been bred for hunting aren't great in warm temperatures, but the German Shorthaired Pointer is the exception. Along with the short hair of their name, they have no undercoat and will happily go for a dip in a lake or river to cool off if they do get a bit hot under the collar. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)
Most dogs that have been bred for hunting aren't great in warm temperatures, but the German Shorthaired Pointer is the exception. Along with the short hair of their name, they have no undercoat and will happily go for a dip in a lake or river to cool off if they do get a bit hot under the collar. (Photo: Canva/Getty Images)