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Dolphins WR Tyreek Hill competes in first track meet since 2014: 'Never racing again'

Wide receiver Tyreek Hill is fast but maybe not as
Wide receiver Tyreek Hill is fast but maybe not as "track fast" as he hoped to be Saturday. (Photo by Michael Owens/Getty Images)

Miami Dolphins wide receiver Tyreek Hill competed in his first track meet in nine years Saturday, and even though he got the win, it appears he might focus on his NFL career going forward.

The 29-year-old ran a 60-meter time of 6.70 in the 25-29 age division of the USA Track and Field Masters Indoor Championships. The next-best time in his heat was a 7.27.

The time ties Hill with a few other runners for 213th place in the world this year in the event.

After the race, Hill took to Twitter. "Never racing again," he wrote. "Had me out there looking wild."

Nicknamed "Cheetah," Hill sometimes calls himself "the fastest man on Earth." With his speedy reputation, it makes sense that he would expect to run a time closer to his 6.64 best from 2014. Or maybe he was hoping for an even more competitive time, as professional sprinter Trayvon Bromell is leading the world this season with a 6.42 he ran in February.

Track & Field pros weigh in

Masters meets often feature amateur athletes from 25 to over 100 years old. Upon news of his entry in the event Friday, career runners were to quick to react. Marvin Bracy-Williams Jr., a 2016 Olympian in the 100m and 200m, joked on Twitter, writing "cmon dawg," with laughing emojis. Hill responded, "I know how to stir the pot."

He ran a 20.14-second 200-meter dash during his high school career. The automatic qualifying time for the Olympic Trials that year was 20.55. Instead, he competed at the world junior championships and junior nationals. He went on to compete for Oklahoma State and made the NCAA Indoor Championship finals in the 200, finishing fifth.

Hill's personal best in the 100m is 10.19 seconds. He also ran a wind-aided time of 9.98, which doesn't stand for official purposes due to a a 5.0 meter/second tailwind.

There's no question that Hill is fast, but some pointed out the potential issue with his speed being compared to the elites of athletics. Michael Johnson is a legend of the sport, who won four Olympic gold medals and eight World Championships gold medals during his career. He noted that Hill's performance brought the wideout more exposure, but doesn't necessarily shine a light on the athletes who sprint professionally.

Hill sent out a tweet in February challenging anyone to race him. Bromell, the reigning U.S. champion (9.76 100m sprinter), quickly responded that he’d race Hill over 60 meters with the winner taking home $10,000. That race did not occur.

Jasmine Todd, a 2015 World Championships silver medalist, weighed in on the conversation, encouraging Hill to try "calling out" the three high school boys who ran faster than him Saturday at New Balance Nationals. Also competing in the long jump, she holds a personal record of 10.92 in the 100m dash.

In January 2020, Hill said he wanted to qualify for the U.S. Olympic team. Ato Boldon, a four-time Olympic sprint medalist, called Hill’s chances of qualifying for the trials “a long shot.” Hill didn't end up pursuing any Olympic competition.