Trump opens up on his 'tough' job and 'smart cookie' Kim Jong-Un

Cordelia Lynch, US Correspondent

"I love your show - I call it Deface the Nation. But, you know, your show is sometimes not exactly correct."

It isn't any great surprise that Donald Trump has taken aim at the media in an interview.

The outsider, who campaigned against the establishment and gave rise to "fake news" as a rallying cry, skipped the White House Correspondents Dinner on Saturday night in favour of a rally in Pennsylvania surrounded by his supporters.

In a wide interview with CBS programme Face the Nation, the President was asked about his recent comment that he thought the job of president "would be easier".

:: Trump: My first 100 days were 'very productive'

Trump explained at length how much he loves the role but feels that it's a "tough job".

He insisted though that he'll be doing it for eight years and believes he's already done "great" things with foreign policy and trade deals.

In North Korea, Donald Trump faces a pressing threat.

Just one day after Pyongyang test-launched a ballistic missile, President Trump said he "will not be happy" if North Korea conducts another nuclear test and declined to rule out a US military response to such a provocation.

"I don't know. I mean, we'll see," Mr Trump said of possible military action.

The Trump administration has been calling for China and other international partners to put pressure on the North Korean regime, whilst retaining a level of ambiguity about what the US might be willing to do in the face of a provocation.

But Mr Trump did offer some analysis on his adversary, describing Kim Jong-Un as someone who "at a very young age…was able to assume power".

He added: "A lot of people, I'm sure, tried to take that power away, whether it was his uncle or anybody else.

"And he was able to do it. So obviously, he's a pretty smart cookie. But we have a situation that we just cannot let - we cannot let what's been going on for a long period of years continue."

"People are saying, 'Is he sane?' I have no idea," Mr Trump told the CBS programme.

Russia, has provided a scandal that refuses to go away, but Donald Trump says he still can't be sure that the country interfered in the US election.

"The concept of Russia with respect to us is total phoney story," Trump said.

"We have to find out what happened. I'd love to find out what happened. I can tell you one thing. Had nothing to do with us," referring to links between Trump campaign aides and Russian officials.

Republicans and Democrats have claimed Trump's former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn may have broken the law by receiving money from Russia and Turkey.

The claims have raised questions about whether he was properly vetted by the White House.

But the President placed the blame on the Obama administration, saying: "I didn't realise this, when he went to Russia, it was 2015 and he was on the Obama clearance.

"When General Flynn came to us, as you now know, he already had the highest clearance you can have. I think the same clearance as the President of the United States would have. He had this really high clearance.

"And, by the way, they're so devastated because this only came up two days ago."

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