Drivers who keep car in 'poor' condition face £2,500 fine in crackdown

Drivers could face hefty fines for driving law safety breaches as millions risk failing MOTs. Drivers could be slapped with police fines of up to £2,500 for poor vehicle quality, it has been warned, with road users facing a crackdown if they're at the wheel.

Vehicles which are not properly maintained could see drivers slapped with police fines of up to £2,500 for driving a car in a dangerous condition. Connor Campbell, expert at Independent Advisor Car Insurance, explained that MOTs are an official test of car roadworthiness.

Campbell added: “While people often delay maintaining their car for financial or time reasons, the cost can be greater the longer these are left unattended.” And Mr Campbell stated that while minor damages such as dents aren’t deemed dangerous, more serious damage, such as “excessive corrosion, sharp damage, or damage to specific areas of the vehicle could deem it non-roadworthy”.

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Mr Campbell commented: “While people often delay maintaining their car for financial or time reasons, the cost can be greater the longer these are left unattended.” Annex 6 of the Highway Code dictates: "Take special care that lights, brakes, steering, exhaust system, seat belts, demisters, wipers, washers and any audible warning systems are all working.

"Lights, indicators, reflectors, and number plates MUST be kept clean and clear, windscreens and windows MUST be kept clean and free from obstructions to vision, lights MUST be properly adjusted to prevent dazzling other road users, extra attention needs to be paid to this if the vehicle is heavily loaded and exhaust emissions MUST NOT exceed prescribed levels."

Drivers must also "ensure your seat, seat belt, head restraint and mirrors are adjusted correctly before you drive" and "ensure that items of luggage are securely stowed." It adds: "Vehicles currently excluded from tyre roadworthiness regulations and vehicles of historical interest which are not used for commercial purpose are exempt from these requirements."