Drivers in London spend average of 99 hours a year in traffic

Traffic in London's Chiswick High Road
The length of time lost to jams in London last year was 3 per cent above pre-coronavirus levels - Jamie Lorriman

Drivers in London spent an average of 99 hours sitting in traffic in 2023, a report has found.

The report by traffic information supplier Inrix also found the capital’s roads have been ranked the most congested in Europe for the third year in a row.

That was up from 97 hours in 2022 and was more than any other city in Europe, behind only New York and Mexico City worldwide.

The length of time lost to jams in London last year was 3 per cent above pre-coronavirus levels.

London was ranked as the world’s second most congested city in 2022.

Traffic in New York
London was behind only New York and Mexico City worldwide for congestion levels - Mary Altaffer/AP

Bob Pishue, a transportation analyst and the author of the report, said: “We are seeing travel return to pre-Covid levels.

“The UK and Europe have seen smaller increases in congestion this year than in other parts of the world which indicates that these countries have found their new travel norms.

“While London remains most impacted by congestion in the UK, its drop to third suggests that other large global cities have returned to pre-Covid levels of activity.

“As an indication of strong economic activity, increased congestion can be a positive sign for cities.”

The report stated that a typical driver in the UK lost 61 hours due to traffic jams last year, up from 57 hours in the previous 12 months.

The 61 hours equates to a financial impact of £558, according to Inrix.

After London, the UK’s most congested urban areas were Birmingham, Bristol, Leeds and Wigan.