These 'Drunk History' stories will get you in the Christmas spirit

Nick Paschal
Supervising Producer, Yahoo Entertainment

The Drunk History Christmas Special had all the holiday history and intoxicated storytellers we needed to put us in the spirit of the season.

Craig Anstett gave a Revolutionary War history lesson like you’ve never heard before. The comedian recounted the elements George Washington’s army had to brave crossing the Delaware River on Christmas Day in 1776. “So by the time the battle was over, Washington had captured over 1,000 Hessians, and only four Continental Army troops had died,” Anstett explained. “And then they look, there’s all these supplies. And then in the corner, there’s a pile of rum. They all start pounding rum, getting drunk.” Anstett reminded viewers just how hilarious this show is, whether the viewer has had a few drinks or not.

Vodka-infused actor Phil Hendrie shared the story about how Charles Dickens created modern Christmas as we know it, saying that Dickens had written A Christmas Carol in six weeks.

Finally, Rich Fulcher ended the Christmas history tales with a lot of whiskey, explaining how Teddy Roosevelt’s kids saved Christmas in 1901. Roosevelt loved trees so much, he didn’t want a Christmas tree in the White House. His kids had other ideas. Two of his sons ended up cutting down a pine from the White House lawn, lit it up, and placed it in the library. Teddy ended up loving it and lifted the ban on Christmas tree cutting.

We’ve heard these stories before, but they sound better when extremely drunk comedians tell them.

Drunk History airs on Comedy Central. Go to cc.com for more hilarious history lessons. 

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