Ducklings rescued from drain as officers lure them out by playing duck sounds

·2-min read
The ducklings were rescued in Pontypridd, Wales (RSPCA)
The ducklings were rescued in Pontypridd, Wales (RSPCA)

Five ducklings have been rescued from a storm drain after being lured out by officers playing duck sounds on their mobile phones.

The flock, thought to be around a week old, were trapped in the drain on Thursday when they followed their mother across Llantrisant Road in Pontypridd, Wales.

While the mother had managed to walk over the drain and climb into a hedge, five fell through the grate, with the incident being witnessed by a nearby motorist who called the RSPCA.

The ducklings were only enticed out when officers played duck sounds on their mobile phones (RSPCA)
The ducklings were only enticed out when officers played duck sounds on their mobile phones (RSPCA)

A crew from Pontypridd Fire and Rescue Stations were called to lift the drain, where they then closed the country road in one direction and managed traffic to allow for the two-hour rescue mission.

The animals were rescued unharmed and finally enticed out when officers played duck noises to them on their phones.

RSPCA inspector Sophie Daniels said: “These sorts of rescues take time and require patience because the ducklings can disappear along connecting side pipes, which is what they kept doing, so we got out our mobile phones and started playing duck sounds to try and entice them back into the main chamber where I could reach them.

The ducklings fell into a grate while following their mother on Thursday (RSPCA)
The ducklings fell into a grate while following their mother on Thursday (RSPCA)

“We were there for a good couple of hours, but the firefighters were absolutely determined to get them all out.

“The drain was too heavy for me to lift on my own, and it’s quite a fast country road, so their support was fantastic.”

Ms Daniels added everyone was “really pleased” when the ducklings were brought to the surface with nothing more than a few ruffled feathers.

“It’s another reminder of what we can do together for animal welfare,” she said.

“As always, we are incredibly grateful to the fire service for the compassion and care shown by their officers when we need to call on them for help.”

The ducklings will stay in RSPCA care before being transported to a local wildlife charity, where they will remain until they are old enough to be released.

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