Emma Raducanu splits from coach who guided her to shock US Open triumph

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Emma Raducanu has split from the coach who guided her to US Open glory just two weeks ago – and says she is looking for someone more experienced to take her to the next level.

The 18-year-old said it had been tough to dispense with the services of Andrew Richardson, who only joined her coaching team after Wimbledon. However, she said it was necessary in order to compete with the world’s best WTA players.

“It’s tough to have that conversation with anyone, but I think for me that’s just really what I need – someone who’s had that professional tour experience, and has been through it, and seen players in my situation for many years, going through the same because it’s going to take a lot,” she said.

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“The players at the top that I was having to play and the players that are on the tour you know they’re serious competition and serious players. I felt like I just really need someone right now who has been through that and can really guide me along the way because I’m still very very new to everything.”

The 18-year-old only linked up with Richardson, one of her youth coaches, in July, after she surprisingly dispensed with the services of the highly experienced Nigel Sears after Wimbledon.

Related: Emma Raducanu returns to homemade dumplings after US Open ‘whirlwind’

Richardson, 47, has done little coaching at main tour level, but worked with her at Bromley Tennis Centre for two years from the age of 11. But in New York, Raducanu had praised him for his calming influence and being very good at instilling the fundamentals into her game. But having won the US Open, and moved to 22 in the world, Raducanu believes she needs a change.

“After Wimbledon, I was ranked around 200 in the world” she said. “And, at the time I thought Andrew would be a great coach to try and I went to the States. Never did I even dream of winning the US Open and having the run I did, and now I’m ranked 22 in the world which is pretty crazy to me.”

Darren Cahill, who recently parted ways with the 2019 Wimbledon champion Simona Halep, is one potential option, but Raducanu insisted that she was in no rush to appoint a new coach. “I don’t have anyone in mind,” said Raducanu, who was non-committal when asked when she will return to the WTA Tour. “When playing tournaments this year, I don’t think that’s the best time to try to out a coach. So in the preseason, when I’m done with whatever tournaments I play, I’m going to try some coaches out.

“I feel like at this stage of my career I really need someone that has had that WTA experience at the high levels,” she added. “I’m looking for someone who has been at that level and knows what it takes. And especially right now, because I’m so new to it.”

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