Essex mother and son 'on the run' as they appear on Channel 4 show Hunted

·2-min read
Hunted HQ Hunters L-R: Deputy Hattie Haslam-Greene, The Chief Lisa Theaker, and Head of Ops Ray Howard. Picture: PA Photo/Channel 4 Television/Colin Hutton
Hunted HQ Hunters L-R: Deputy Hattie Haslam-Greene, The Chief Lisa Theaker, and Head of Ops Ray Howard. Picture: PA Photo/Channel 4 Television/Colin Hutton

A mother and son from Essex are appearing on the hit Channel 4 show Hunted.

Amarinder, 34, and Shoba, 59, have gone on the run as part of the TV programme.

The pair must evade capture for 23 days.

The show follows a group of pairs and individuals who must try to avoid being captured by a team of hunters, who also have experience being in the police and military.

With her 60th birthday approaching Shoba, an admin officer, decided she wanted her “first proper” adventure.

Shoba, was raised in a traditional Indian household and had an arranged marriage at just eighteen.

She has spent most of her life devoting herself to her four children, which includes her youngest son Amarinder, who is a dentist.

Amarinder admits he is a ‘mummy’s boy’.

The pair do everything together, from exercising to shopping.

Speaking about why he signed up Amarinder said: “One of the biggest reasons why I wanted to do it is because I wanted to go on an adventure with my mum.

“I wanted you to take part in Hunted because I find my life has been feeling a little bit boring with my career and stuff. I needed excitement in my life.”

Shoba added: “I'm taking part in this because again, I haven't had an opportunity to do anything for myself.

“I've just been a mum doing things to fulfil my kids’ lives, and it's about time I do something for myself, so I'm going to go for it.

“And obviously I’m going with my son – we’re quite close and we’re just going to enjoy those moments and experience adventure.

“And I’d love to show you can do something like this at any age. I feel maybe I might inspire people out there.”

The pair admitted they were going to try and avoid cameras and too many public places.

Shoba added: “It's a bit daunting because obviously we're not going to have our phones. No money, no nothing.

“I haven't been in this situation before and I am a bit nervous about it to tell you the truth, but it's going to be another experience. I might get something good from it.

“It’s an experience I hope I might learn something from. I suppose we take things for granted in life. This is definitely going to be a challenge.”

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