Ex-porn star Jenna Jameson is definitely not here for transgender Playboy Playmates

Jenna Jameson at a “Celebrity Big Brother” taping in September. (Photo: Getty Images)

The legendary men’s magazine Playboy has made the controversial decision to feature French model Ines Rau, a transgender woman, as the playmate for November. And not everyone is thrilled.

Adult film star Jenna Jameson came out against the decision on Twitter saying: “So @playboy just announced it will be featuring its first transgender playmate…


Both supporters and detractors came out in the wake of Jameson’s comments, with some arguing this is a step forward in accepting transgender people, and others decrying a breakdown in gender roles.

“Playboy has women in it. Playgirl has men in it. The Boy Scouts have boys in it. The Girl Scouts have girls in it. Why is this so hard?” writes Nathan Wales in response to Jameson’s tweet.


“So many LGBTQ people have been fans of you & actually looked up to you & your empire. That’s sad you would be so judgmental.” Tweeted Jeremy Dolce.


Jameson tempered her comments in a response saying, “Just because Miss USA won’t let me compete (because I’m an ex pornstar) doesn’t mean they don’t love me. I love my gay and trans peeps”


Jameson told Fox News, “I just think it’s a ridiculous attempt by Playboy to stay relevant. It is a foolish decision that alienates its consumer base.”

The magazine’s founder, Hugh Hefner, passed away last month at the age of 91. His son, 26-year-old Cooper Hefner, is chief creative officer at the magazine and made the decision to feature Rau. It “very much speaks to the brand’s philosophy,” Hefner told the New York Times, “It’s the right thing to do. We’re at a moment where gender roles are evolving.”

Some readers find the decision at odds with the magazine’s original mission. Yes, Playboy was founded on the principle of pushing boundaries, but its cornerstone was a blend of celebrating the female form and machismo for a readership of heterosexual men.

“This is really a moment for us to take a step back and say that so much of what the brand stood for in the early years is very much still alive in culture,” said Hefner.

Fans of the brand have shared a mix of support and disappointment on the magazine’s social media pages. In response, Playboy shared a snippet from a 1965 letter to the editor, equating criticism of the decision to feature Rau with racism. The letter reads: “I do not need the foldout in the March issue. … There are too many Negroes at this university now.”


This comes at a time when transgender issues are a daily part of the national conversation with debates over bathrooms and whether transgender individuals are fit to serve in America’s armed forces. President Trump in August signed a directive banning transgender troops from the military.

This is not the first time Playboy has featured a transgender woman in the magazine. In 2014 they published a full nude photo of Rau in a series called “Playboy A-Z.” In 1981 Caroline (Tula) Cossey appeared in a pictorial with Roger Moore for the James Bond film “For Your Eyes Only”.

Cossey would be outed by a British tabloid not long after, but would return to the pages of Playboy in 1991 for a solo pictorial, a first for a transgender woman.

As for Rau, she says she cried tears of happiness when she got the news she’d be featured: “I was just thinking of being this little lonely boy in the ghetto, in the shadows in my room. And now I’m in Los Angeles shooting Playboy looking so beautiful, feeling so amazing. I cried of happiness.”

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