'Twerking' and 'amazeballs' are among our most hated words, but which ones do we love most?

A recent study asked thousands of adults which words they just love to hear and use - and which ones make their blood boil

'Twerking', 'amazeballs' and 'moist' were yesterday (Thur) named and shamed as the words we most hate - while 'beer', 'snuggle' and 'wazzock' are ones we love.

Others (non-expletive) words guaranteed to make us squirm include 'whatever', the over-used 'basically' and the slightly more unpleasant 'piddle'.

Ten of UK's most hated words:

Twerking
Amazeballs
Moist
Whatever
Basically
Piddle
Banter
Random
Totes
Anaesthetic

Most loved words:


Circumnavigate
Discombobulate
Hippopotamus
Raindrop
Sprocket
Plump
Wazzock
Thingamabob
Bundle
Exacerbate
The likes of 'banter', 'random' and 'totes', which have all become commonplace in recent years, also featured as our least-favourite words.

Meanwhile words which roll off the tongue such as 'discombobulate', 'haberdashery' and 'knickerbockerglory' all made it onto the list of those we love.

A recent study asked thousands of adults which words they just love to hear and use - and which ones make their blood boil.

Among other most hated words were 'anaesthetic' - possibly because it is difficult to spell and has serious medical connotations - and 'violate', perhaps because of its link to all things criminal.

'Snogging', 'discharge', 'oregano' and 're-deploy', 'bespoke' and 'prejudice' were all strongly disliked by the adults surveyed.

'Couch', 'bromance' and 'blancmange' also made the hated list as did 'mental', 'nugget',  'anomaly', 'cusp', 'ointment', 'flow', 'rasher' and 'gesticulate'.

The respondents were also asked to put forward names which they enjoy reeling off.

Among these were 'circumnavigate', 'discombobulate' and 'hippopotamus', while love was also expressed for 'raindrop', 'sprocket', 'plump', wazzock', 'thingamabob', 'badger' and 'bundle'.

A spokesman for paid survey site, OnePoll, which commissioned the study of 2,000 adults, said: 'We never imagined the nation would find such mainstream words so frustrating.

'Quite often we find ourselves using these words automatically in sentences every day without realising we could be frustrating our friends, family or colleagues.

A total of 500 words were put forward in total of which researchers published the top 25 of each.